Follow:
A Failure of Vision
Ukraine’s Grim Slide

The current political crisis shows just how weak Ukraine’s government really is—but it also shows just how badly the West has failed Ukraine.

Corruption in Kiev
Ukrainian Government on the Ropes?

We’re beginning to see a pattern, and it isn’t a pretty one for President Poroshenko.

Same old same old
Is Putin Going Soft on Ukraine?

No, no he’s not.

Putinism
Why The Kremlin Has To Keep Lying

As the Kremlin fights to keep the issue of Russian soldiers dying on the battlefields of Ukraine a secret at home, it’s resorting to increasingly authoritarian methods.

Ukraine Crisis
EU Squeezes a Rotten Fruit

As the fight heats up in eastern Ukraine, the EU is putting pressure on Kyiv to live up to its Minsk commitments. Instead, Brussels ought to be thinking of ways to help Ukraine’s reform along.

Progress
Ukraine Starts Cleaning Its Augean Stables

Two dramatic moves by Ukraine’s governments against corruption give one hope that Ukraine may be able to turn the corner.

The Ukraine Mess
War of the Oligarchs in Ukraine

A tense standoff between the Ukrainian government and a powerful regional governor oligarch over control of state energy assets has begun. The outcome of the standoff could provide the good insight as to whether the Ukrainian state has any chance of success going forward.

Money & Corruption in Modern Europe
Why The EU Fears Putin

Vladimir Putin’s actions in Crimea indicate just how confident he is that he has the West over a barrel. And given how the Europeans are hesitating to impose targeted sanctions on Russia’s kleptocratic elite, his calculations may prove to be correct.

The Death of Aaron Swartz

Yesterday’s suicide of Aaron Swartz, 26, one of the founders of Reddit and a passionate activist for Internet causes, has shaken the tech world. By all accounts a brilliant and fiercely idealistic (if somewhat troubled) young man, Swartz had his fingerprints on many of the things we take for granted online today, from the RSS […]

Human Rights, and Wrongs

Aryeh Neier's new history of the human rights movement manages to be dull, impersonal and evasive all at the same time. But when read carefully, it shows signs that the movement's old guard is growing more uncomfortable with the unfettered idealism of the rising generation of human rights activists.

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
© The American Interest LLC 2005-2020
About Us Privacy
We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.