Checking China
The Case for Clarity on Taiwan

Our policy of “strategic ambiguity”—in which neither China nor Taiwan can be sure whether the United States will intervene in a conflict—has outlived its usefulness.

Thierry Ehrmann, Abode of Chaos via Flickr
TAI Conversations
Is Xi Jinping Weaker Than We Think?

The author of China’s Crony Capitalism discusses the Chinese response to COVID-19, why the Communist Party reads Alexis de Tocqueville, and why the Chinese regime is both brittle and aggressive at the same time.

(Wikimedia Commons)
Breaking Up Is Hard To Do
One Concrete Way to Start Decoupling with China

It’s time to be more strategic about trade with China. Revitalizing the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States—creating a CFIUS 2.0—is the right way to do it.

Fiscal Folly
Don’t Slash the Defense Budget to Pay for COVID-19

Coping with the pandemic will be a costly affair. But cutting defense spending—when China, Russia, and Iran remain significant threats—will only make us less secure.

COVID-19 Coverup
The Chinese Big Lie

Why is Beijing covering up what happened in Hubei? Put simply: because it can.

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No Immunity
National Security and the Pandemic of 2020

The coronavirus isn’t just a danger to public health and the economy; it also threatens our national security infrastructure.

(Wikimedia Commons)
In Defense of Ageism
Why We Need a Constitutional Age Limit for President

Electing septuagenarians, with all the demands and pressures of the Presidency, is rolling the dice with a constitutional crisis.

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The Foreign Policy Debate We Need
Is a New Kirkpatrick Doctrine the Answer?

Five experts respond to Svante E. Cornell’s essay, “How Should America Deal with Authoritarian States?” and discuss the legacy of Jeane Kirkpatrick for policymakers today.

(Wikimedia Commons)
Bolton's Game-Changer?
Trump, Clinton, and Defining Deviancy Down

Trump’s still-likely acquittal will lower the bar for presidential behavior—just as Bill Clinton’s did in 1999.

A Win for Democracy
A Stunner in Taiwan

On the ground, among the remarkable crowds, there was nevertheless a sense of foreboding among some Taiwanese about how these elections would turn out.

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