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Photograph by Peter-Cunningham, 2018 (Courtesy of Polk & Co.)
The Lifespan of a Fact
Checking the Fact Checkers

Can sticking to the facts obscure the truth? A recent Broadway play takes a Talmudic approach to the debate.

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U.S. Navy/Liaison
The Realist Fallacy
“Liberal Hegemony” Is a Straw Man

Academic “realists” are guilty of intellectual overreach in their critique of international overreach.

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The Liberal Imperialist
Churchill in All His Complexity

Andrew Roberts’s Churchill biography confronts his subject’s central paradox: How the ardent believer in the goodness of British imperialism became the stalwart champion of liberal democracy.

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(Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
Checking China
The Road to (Super)Power

Bruno Maçães’s new book is a masterful overview of China’s Belt and Road project—and a disturbing portrait of things to come.

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Composite by Danielle Desjardins
The Bulldog Behind the Easel
Churchill’s Canvases

A new book explores the artwork of Winston Churchill, and finds surprising resonances between his artistic legacy and his political one.

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(Lintao Zhang/Pool/Getty Images)
The Oil Kingdom and the Middle Kingdom
China’s Gulf Connection

A new book offers a helpful primer on Beijing’s deepening relationships in the Gulf.

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Wikipedia Commons
Institutional Decay
The Fall of Jim Wright—and the House of Representatives

If you want to understand what’s gone wrong in Congress, the career of Jim Wright offers a good place to start.

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© Netflix
At the Movies
The Death of the Auteur

Orson Welles’s final film, newly completed after four decades in limbo, is a fascinating paradox: a deeply personal but radically collaborative project, which speaks as much to our time as to his.

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Courtesy of Zipporah Films
At the Movies
Wiseman in the Heartland

A new documentary from an 88-year-old master casts an empathetic spotlight on small-town America, and the institutions that sustain its communal life.

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Wikimedia Commons
Pop Idols
Clapton and the Devil Blues

A new biography of Eric Clapton tells a quintessential ’60s story—and a didactic tale of how suffering can lead to redemption.

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We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.