Francis Fukuyama
Democracy, Development & the Rule of Law
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Reviews
Waltzing with (Leo) Strauss

A new book arguing for the ubiquity of esoteric writing in pre-modern times redeems Leo Strauss from his many detractors.

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Democracy More or Less
The Limits of Transparency

The idea that more transparency in government is always an unalloyed good is a dangerous populist illusion.

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© Getty Images
Immigration Unilateralism
A Bad Call

President Obama is frustrated by gridlock and partisanship, and is seeking to use executive authority to rescue something of a legacy from his second term. His unilateralism will in no way make things better, however—quite the opposite.

Housekeeping
Welcome to the New Site

As the new site launches, a few words from the business side of the magazine.

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Tim Bower
Political Development
Good Government, Bad Government

Fortuitous historical sequencing in political development is one of the keys to good government.

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The State
Political Order and Political Decay

Volume two of the project I started writing in 2011, titled Political Order in Changing Societies, hits bookstores later this month. It is an attempt to map out how modern states have evolved out of patrimonial ones, and tries to show how simplistic understandings of how development works can lead to disastrous policy.

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The Ties That Used to Bind
The Decay of American Political Institutions

We have a problem, but we can’t see it clearly because our focus too often discounts history.

Why We Need a New Pendleton Act

The botched rollout of healthcare.gov shows why the US desperately needs reform of its public sector.

Bad Mandates and Dirty Water

I could spend the next ten posts or so describing how poorly crafted legislative mandates have led to bad administrative outcomes, but I’ll provide just one here that is quite typical of many developing-world public agencies.The city of Hyderabad, India, has been one of the fastest growing over the past two decades, and one of […]

Bad Mandates

The US Army’s incorporation of mission orders into its combined arms doctrine described in an earlier post was an example of a government agency that was delegated an appropriate degree of bureaucratic autonomy, a delegation that extended down to the lowest levels of the organization.  This kind of delegation is extremely rare in government operations, […]

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