Spanish Secession
Brussels Keeps Its Distance From Catalan Crackdown
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  • Angel Martin

    What is France’s position ?

    They support Quebec separation. What about Catalonia ?

    • tellourstory

      I suspect the answer would depend on whether they see it as in France’s best interest or not.

      Speaking of Quebec, I remember reading a book about French history some years ago that mentioned that Charles De Gaulle came to Canada and gave a speech promoting Quebec secession. The speech was so popular that De Gaulle was forced to flee from Canada at midnight on an airplane directly back to France. I’m not sure if I am remembering the whole story correctly, but it amused me a lot at the time given how polite Canadians typically are.

      • seattleoutcast

        Vive le Quebec libre! is what he said.

      • Angel Martin

        It was de Gaulle’s special “thank you” for Juno Beach.

  • Andrew Allison

    Angela Merkel a conservative? Reuters has apparently lost its collective mind.

  • seattleoutcast

    I would love to see a Bavarian independence movement.

  • Beauceron

    “But images of police jailing elected officials and confiscating ballot boxes naturally stirs unease.”

    You certainly have a gift for understatement.

    “This may not look like political bravery, but it could lead to a gradual de-escalation.”

    It does not look like bravery because it is not bravery. The EU has been, as usual, self-serving, distant and more than a little hypocritical. I think Spain has just pushed a bunch of Catalans who may have been sitting on the fence into supporters of secession.

    That said, when serious secessionist movements start hitting the US, I suspect our government will be far worse than Spain’s.

  • Did the E.U. hold the same position when Kosovo was trying to secede from Serbia? I mean, I’m not necessarily backing the Catalans, I’m just kind of curious.

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