Harsh Realities
India Plans for 30+ Years of Emissions Growth
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  • Andrew Allison

    India is looking in the wrong place. Given the exponential rate of increase, China’s cumulative contribution will soon match that of the developed nations, and is currently emitting about four times as much per capita as India. A more cogent argument would be: China first!

    • Pete

      He’s afraid of China, and he knows Uncle Sap is a convenient punching bag.

    • AndrewL

      Per capita CO2 emission, in metric tons, 2010 (http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/EN.ATM.CO2E.PC):
      – India: 1.7
      – China: 6.2
      – UK: 7.9
      – Germany: 9.1
      – Japan: 9.2
      – Russia: 12.2
      – US: 17.6

      Looks like India’s environment minister was right on the money.

      • Andrew Allison

        The atmosphere is insensitive to the number of people producing the emissions, just the amount. FWIW, the link which you provided shows that16 countries have higher per capita emissions than the USA.

        • AndrewL

          Yes, there are a number of countries that have even higher per capita emissions than the US. At least they have enough self-awareness to refrain from criticizing countries with lower per capita emissions.

          • Andrew Allison

            The only countries doing any criticizing are the less-developed nations claiming that the so-called “moral principle of historic responsibility” requires developed nations to pay for their emission reduction. If the developed nations can be persuaded that it is their interests to do so, fine. If not, they are much better equipped to deal with the consequences than the less-developed nations. Meanwhile, spare us the moral posturing. The fact that emissions in both the US and Europe are at levels last seen 50 years ago demonstrates that growth does not have to be carbon-based. It may be cheaper and faster but what if, as in parts of China, the air is unbreathable?

          • AndrewL

            Do you have any data to back up your claim that emissions in the US have dropped to the level of 1960’s? According to the Energy Information Administration (http://www.eia.gov/cfapps/ipdbproject/iedindex3.cfm?tid=90&pid=44&aid=8&cid=&syid=1980&eyid=2011&unit=MMTCD), US emission in 1980 was 4775 million metric tons, increasing to 5490 in 2011. You’re right about Europe though. Germany’s emission went down from 1055 to 748 over the same period.

            Yes, thank goodness that growth does not have to be carbon-based. But there isn’t much enthusiasm over moving away from carbon-based growth in the US. On the contrary, enthusiasm over fracking continues unabated, and half the electorate doesn’t even believe that climate change is man-made.

          • Andrew Allison

            G-O-O-G-L-E

          • AndrewL

            Care to share the link?

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