Iraq Wants US Forces To Stay
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  • stephen b

    As a USAF officer with 82nd AB going into Iraq in March 2003, my boss told me that when the “polo shirt, chino crowd showed up and began engaging with Iraqi civil society” then we could know our mission had a chance of success. Of course that never happened to extent necessary. Remember those State department types whining about having to go to Iraq? There was really only one segment of US state power engaged in making Iraq a success, and they have borne the brunt of their sole participation.

  • Kenny

    If Iraq’s political leaders what us to stay there. then let ’em for the service.

    Something like $1 million dollar to the family of every member of the U.S. military killed in addition to the cost of our army being there.

    As for “in addition US civil society needs to get more involved. More Iraqi academics, journalists, religious leaders and opinion makers need to visit the US,” I say let them visit. But once their alloted time is up, out.

    The U.S. is going bankrupt — is bankrupt and we’re wasting blood and treasure over in that sand box.

    privilage

    • Walter Russell Mead

      @Kenny: You’d have a stronger case if they’d invited us over in the first place.

  • Live, from Ft Leavenworth’s ILE

    Oh, uh – Mead is here!

    @Kenny – remind Mr. Mead of his Frank Herbert:

    “Your highness, there must be some mistake, I never requested your presence…”

    cheers
    Jon

  • Luke Lea

    No surprise there. Maybe it is time to take the force we now have stationed in South Korea and move it to Iraq?

  • Jeff77450

    I’m a retired soldier and I’d like to see the U.S. stop being the world’s policeman. Defense needs to be cut by about 1/3, maybe more (over a period of time). If countries that live in “bad neighborhoods” like Iraq, Kuwait, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, Korea, Japan et al want U.S. troops to remain then our response could be “Fine, but you pay (pick-a-number) 80% of the *total* cost of stationing them there–recruitment, training, equiping, deploying, supplying, troop-rotations, etc.” (Why not 100%? I recognize that the U.S. derives some benefit from the armed forces being a certain size; employment, economies-of-scale,etc.).

    Just the thought of all the nations that we’ve defended, liberated, given money to–who routinely bad-mouth the U.S. and engaged in blatantly unfair trade practices–being over-run by islamic & mongolian hordes fills my heart with a malevolent *glee*. (Exceptions would include our genuine allies like the U.K., Australia and Israel; maybe a couple of others). I should be ashamed—but I’m not.

  • Mick The Reactionary

    @Kenny:
    “If Iraq’s political leaders what us to stay there. then let ‘em for the service.

    Something like $1 million dollar to the family of every member of the U.S. military killed in addition to the cost of our army being there.”

    A family of a criminal hoodlum justifiably killed by police gets more than that from a (usually) bankrupt American city.

    We are talking about our brave boys and girls in uniform, well trained, with expected life earnings well above $1M.

    I say charge the barbarians $10M per murdered soldier. Charge them fully-loaded cost of army (operational expenses plus R&D plus the rest).

    @Mead:
    @Kenny: You’d have a stronger case if they’d invited us over in the first place.”

    What invitation has to do with the price of halal pork in Baghdad?

    Corrupt tribal rulers of Iraq Islamic “democracy” want protection against competing thugs.
    An entirely reasonable wish.

    We have some interests in that smelly pit of a nation.

    We can do what we need to do by withdrawing to Kurdistan, guarantying a de-facto independent state for Kurds and wearily watching the stinky region from there.

    With Turkey going Iran Islamic Republic route, it is only a matter of time (5 years) before US bases will have to be shut down there.

    Kurds are a tiny bit more advanced than their Muslim brethren around them and will be grateful for protection.

    Baghdad can revert to their preferred mode of living with a brutal dictator who on a clear day could see USAF bases in Kurdistan.

    In case if message is not received, a short 3 day bombing campaign would change dictator’s perceptions.

  • Kenny

    Mr. Mead,

    As you can see from the responses to you post here and other previous posts of yours, the days of the U.S. playing the sugar daddy to the world are quickly losing popular support — and none too soon.

    And there’s another things that needs to be watched out for. As things go side-ways in Iraq and Afghanistan which they are sure to do, every native in those rat holes who as much as smiled at an American will be screaming for a ticket here.

    And what will you say then, Mr. Mead, that they deserve entry into the US because they didn’t invite us into their countrie?

    Sorry but that won’t sell. Those kind of silly days are over, too.

  • Mick The Reactionary

    @Kenny:

    “Sorry but that won’t sell. Those kind of silly days are over, too.”

    From your lips to the God’s ears.

    Unfortunately, for the silly days to be over, it will take some really serious financial disaster, something like Russian financial crisis 1998.

    Say Chicoms cut their purchases of US debt by 25% and 15% inflation will set in US for couple years.

    As it is, Congress-thiefs could not cut such nonsense as Libyan adventure. House voted twice to do it and failed each time.

    Look at a young sainted GOP apparatchik Paul Ryan, always ready to cut SS and MediCare for elderly Americans.
    A talented Mr Ryan dutifully voted, as a good GOP functionary he is, to continue all 5 (or is it 6?) excellent adventures in
    Dar al-Islam.

    As a side: how stupid and tone-deaf GOP must be to put Ryan plan for a vote and promote Ryan as face of Republic grandma starver.

    No, nothing of substance will be done till mortgages will hit 14% and stay there for a year or two.

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