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beyond the ivory tower
The Wages of the Campus Revolts
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  • Makaden

    Much of this article plays up the issue as political opportunism by the Right. That’s a huge mistake. There are real consequences for real people because of this sea-change: careers are being ended, learning is being crippled, indoctrination is proliferating, and, above all, white, male, hetero-cis, non-fascists are being demonized as a group–not metaphorically, not as snowflakes–literal, substantial demonization. The demonization of groups never ends well.

    I doubt there will be takers on this opinion, but I’m going to say it anyway: It’s not ISIS that poses the real threat to the West. It’s not even Islamism generally. It’s the rising fascist Left. The latter is more insidious. And the gap in enacted violence between the groups is still wide, but closing quicker than you might imagine. It’s ready to burst at any time.

    There are three possible political outcomes in the next three years:

    1. Congress, the media, and/or the CIA manufactures a reason to impeach Trump, or some insane person takes matters into their own hands–the outcome is, for all intents and purposes, largely the same.
    2. Trump is re-elected in 2020.
    3. Trump is defeated in 2020.

    Only scenario 3 can possibly escape us from the coming violence. If #1 happens, the Right will take matters into their own hands. If #2 happens, the Left will. Both scenarios will be catastrophic for the country. And if the US goes down, all bets are off for the world.

    • Beauceron

      “There are real consequences for real people because of this sea-change:
      careers are being ended, learning is being crippled, indoctrination is
      proliferating, and, above all, white, male, hetero-cis, non-fascists are
      being demonized as a group–not metaphorically, not as
      snowflakes–literal, substantial demonization.”

      But anyone who’s followed this knows exactly what happens when a white person dares to object.

      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/95696a8ecd54e3e0b17295fcd4bd70fb38d6c2940606e66352bde11b7ef8a253.jpg

      • Makaden

        And that is one of the key reasons the situation is so dangerous: there is no legitimate grievance process, not even a legitimate deliberative process.

        • Beauceron

          Of course not. But that’s because white people, particularly white, heterosexual men, can’t possibly have any legitimate grievance. They are the oppressors, and they are all oppressors, with no exceptions. In their view, it’s the white colonialist master complaining to the slave about being mistreated. You don’t need a grievance process for people who can never have anything to be aggrieved about.

          That they themselves could ever be capable of being the oppressor or that a white hetero male might not be a racist, sexist, xenophobic abuser is something that never enters their minds.

    • Jim__L

      The Left isn’t really all that effective. Trump could get re-elected in 2020 without anything serious happening — especially if he delivers economic growth greater than Obama could ever manage.

      • f1b0nacc1

        Absolutely true, and I will go a step further, barring some sort of catastrophic debacle, Trump is likely to be reelected again despite (or largely because) Lefty threats and hysteria. The population (or at least a working majority of it) is rapidly becoming/already tired of this silliness, and will not look kindly on an endless repetition of it.

      • markterribile

        The Left is very effective because it is based on the deadly sins of Envy and Wrath. But it can be answered, and although it can no more be eradicated than can sin, it can be beaten back to a minor threat. We have failed to fight it, and now it has become a clear and present danger to us all, to its own pawns as much as to its enemies.

    • markterribile

      Only scenario 3 can save us, because only in scenario 3 does the rule of law under the Constitution survive while the battle progresses for the survival of the West.
      It’s the West or the Left. Humanity isn’t big enough for both.

      • markterribile

        As I look at my post above, I see the difference between the Left and the Right. The Right actually treasures the written Constitution and the rule of Law, and will not light fires to burn down this house. The Left is all about tearing the house down, and will find any excuse to tear down a wall rather than walking through a door. Each wall that is rebuilt or reinforced against them brings them closer to desire to burn down the house with all in it.
        The rule of Law, one law for all, is not the heart’s treasure of the Left, which is why it constantly underestimates the Right’s determination to keep that treasure and overestimates the Right’s willingness to employ violence.
        And when the Right won’t rise in violence, the Left must paint One Law For All as violence to justify their own gnawing hunger for violence, both to break the rule of Law and to prove to themselves that the Right’s great love is an excuse and a delusion.
        Screwtape was finally forced into heresy: that He (above) really does love the half-flesh, half-spirit ‘amphibians’ that He has created.

    • RaymondJelli

      It is the foot stool Jihadists climb on. If we didn’t have the Left with significant power would the West have issues of migration, etc? Definitely not.

  • Beauceron

    “Most campus lefties will probably look at these numbers as evidence that
    Republicans are even more anti-intellectual than they thought, and that
    the #resistance against them needs to be taken up a few notches. This
    would be a big mistake.”

    Surely. But it would require at least some level of intellectual honesty and self-examination from the Left, and if there’s one thing the Left does not do, it’s self-reflection.

    • RedWell

      No one leans on the left-leaning press and it’s anecdotal style more than conservatives.

      The real story is that nationally, enrollment is down a bit, but that is not even. Some places are doing great and others are declining. Has more to do with economic growth and so on in general than campus liberals. (For example: http://www.chron.com/local/education/campus-chronicles/article/Texas-universities-buck-national-enrollment-drop-11263488.php )

      Of course, I am sure that the 60-70% of conservative parents who think universities are bad for the US will be withdrawing young John and Jane from the business school, the nursing program, and the engineering major in favor of vocational schools and apprenticeships.

      • SDN

        No, they’ll be calling their legislators to arrange for funding cuts. Sucks to be you.

        • RedWell

          Clever: wreck havoc on the world’s most respected higher ed system.

          IN any case, the funding cuts have already been happening over a relatively long period. Though real spending has remained basically stable, spending as a percent of most states’ budgets on higher ed has declined since the days when Boomers could pay for school by working over the summer.

          Higher ed has some problems, for sure, but campus lefties are not the main one.

          But yes, being me does suck, but for other reasons.

  • Mike

    “Over the past few years, leftwing activism on college campuses has reached a level of intensity not seen since…”

    As far as major research universities are concerned, such leftward shift is largely a myth. The majority of these institutions are dominated by science and engineering. Physicists and mathematicians do not normally talk politics between themselves – we don’t have time for that. I spent the last 15 years or so as a tenured professor in one of these places, yet I have no idea whether my colleagues and students vote, let alone who they vote for. It is probably safe to assume that many share my view of Trump, his sycophants, and his supporters as openly hostile to science and education ignorant morons.

    • Spencer

      The strongest form of evidence, anecdote. What a treasure you must have been to your students.

      • Mike

        It is a hypothesis. You are welcome to disprove it if you can.

        • Tex Taylor

          I’ve got a question for you while you formulate your hypothesis, professor.

          If the Republican Party predominately made up of uneducated and scientifically illiterate morons, why is the party invariably called the party of the “rich?”

          • Mike

            Political parties evolve over time, the Republican Party is no exception. Until they have picked Sarah Palin as McCain’s running mate, I was a Republican. Until they have chosen Trump as their nominee, I was a Republican-leaning independent. The Republican Party of today – the Trump party – is a party of ignorant morons. Some of the them are rich, others are poor. A rich moron is still an moron. A moron with an Ivy league degree is still an uneducated moron, too.

          • Tex Taylor

            You strike me as a dweeb bowing at the altar of Obama…like all “scholars,” sure the new messiah would be able to usher in world peace with the magnificence of his dynamic persona, carrying a Nobel awarded by giants of the profession and academia (like Mike).

            Surprise! When does your elect begin to slow the rising tide, “genius?”

          • Mike

            I believe in evolution. Low IQ, general cowardness, and incredible servility synonymous with Trumpism obviously represent a dead end. You will be extinct.

          • Tex Taylor

            Low IQ, general cowardness, and incredible servility synonymous with Trumpism obviously represent a dead end. You will be extinct.

            For a supposed engineer, you sure do deal in being innumerate. However Mike, I want to personally thank you. You see, dinosaurs like you were telling us as late as 2009, the Republican Party would be going the way of the Whigs.

            Your prescience is legend. Eight years later, we now have the most Republican country since a guy named Lincoln was President. Hope & Change…

          • seattleoutcast

            Okay, this is just a smattering liberal talking points. I think you were right when you originally said that the science and engineering departments don’t discuss politics. However, this doesn’t mean the same university is extremely politically correct. We can agree on that, right?

          • seattleoutcast

            Then you don’t understand why Trump got elected. There are many factors, and absolutely none of them have to do with uneducated morons.

            There is a certain amount of hubris that I see with anti-Trump people. When shown the reasons why he was elected, they dismiss the evidence. There are a few in this site’s comment section who repeatedly ignore evidence that is staring them in the face.

    • leoj

      On the one hand: such leftward shift is largely a myth
      On the other: I spent the last 15 years or so as a tenured professor in one of these places, yet I have no idea whether my colleagues and students vote, let alone who they vote for. It is probably safe to assume that many share my view of Trump, his sycophants, and his supporters as openly hostile to science and education ignorant morons.

      I certainly hope you aren’t responsible for the courses in logic or critical thinking….

      • Mike

        It may surprise you, but very few students take courses in what you call ‘logic’ and ‘critical thinking’. These are liberal arts subjects. Science and engineering students don’t need special courses in critical thinking – it comes naturally.

        • Isaiah6020

          I don’t know about handle leoj, but it does not surprise me at all that very few students take courses in “logic” and “critical thinking”. Otherwise, we would not see actions that are currently killing University of Missouri. Alas, majoring in liberal arts these days means something very different than it did even 25 years ago. When you label those who disagree with you on the role of government in society as “openly hostile to science and education ignorant morons”, you are part of the problem.

          • Mike

            What exactly is PC term for ‘ignorant morons’?

          • Isaiah6020

            Is this your clever idea of trolling? I mean, this ignorant moron was considered “rich” by a man no less than President Barack Hussein Obama himself. I guess there might be some disagreement you have with the market of who exactly is an ignorant moron in this situation?
            It’s OK. I don’t expect you to understand any of that. Troll away. You’ve done wonders for Trump2016, and are now hard at work for Trump2020. So you just do you, OK?

          • Mike

            “this ignorant moron was considered…”

            Which one? There are millions upon millions of them. The moron-in-chief loves the uneducated, and they love him back.

          • leoj

            I believe he was referring to himself, Mike “the Scientist and Engineer.” I guess you “Scientists and Engineers” aren’t great at reading comprehension, either. No doubt another facet of traditional education that I would be surprised to discover very few students take courses in because it supposedly comes naturally to them.

          • Mike

            “I believe he was referring to himself”

            I doubt it. But even if he was, ‘I am not a moron because Obama didn’t call me that’ kind of argument is too weak to be convincing.

          • Tom

            “I doubt it. But even if he was, ‘I am not a moron because Obama didn’t call me that’ kind of argument is too weak to be convincing.”

            You might want to try re-reading his comment, because that isn’t what he said.

          • Isaiah6020

            Thanks for your effort on Trump2020. It is appreciated.
            Also, pro tip: when claiming to be a professor, please have some mastery of comprehending what you are reading. Anyway, I have trolls that are smarter than you. And while your efforts in electing Trump are appreciated, it’s not enough to keep me interested in talking to my obvious intellectual inferior.

          • Mike

            If attacking me personally works for you, then you better keep trying. After all, alleviating one’s inferiority complex by all means necessary is an inalienable right of every ignorant moron out there.

          • Angel Martin

            What exactly is PC term for ‘ignorant morons’?

            “Neurodivergent” ?

          • RedWell

            Haha. Yeah, the only people who really care about “PC” are the ones who hate it but who also really want people to treat them with respect. If you say their ideas are hare-brained or ill-grounded, it is offensive and prima facie wrong. Which is, of course, an attempt to force others to be politically correct.

          • random geek

            Most commonly, ‘tenured’.

          • lurkingwithintent

            The PC term is “Mike”.

        • leoj

          Why should it surprise me–unlike you I don’t assume “such leftward shift is largely a myth.”

          Formal logic of the sort pioneered in the 19th century by Frege and Husserl was crucial for Russell & Whitehead, Goedel, Turing–you know, an important foundation of AI. As for what comes naturally, I’ll let you think about that next time you’re sitting on the toilet pounding out a response.

          • Mike

            Again, it may surprise you, but the idea of a rigorous mathematical proof was around well before the 19th century. People knew one when they saw one. For them, it was natural, and still is.

          • leoj

            Funny that you conflate ‘rigorous mathematical proof’ with logic. The conceit that you are a professor of anything anywhere is looking less and less credible. The only thing you’ve said that lends it credence is that you know all your colleagues are left without having to discuss politics. This however is hardly a trade secret.I’m guessing you work with the grounds crew? Maintenance, maybe? No dishonor in that, Mike!

          • Mike

            Since you mentioned Goedel and Turing, the ‘formal logic’ you talk about formalizes the idea of a rigorous mathematical proof. It is a branch of mathematics.

            Now, you are welcome to attack me personally as much as you want. If it works for you – then go ahead, by all means. I couldn’t care less.

        • J K Brown

          Really, it comes naturally? I knew a lot of engineering and Physics students for whom it came only after long hours sweating over problem set after problem set. Perhaps it came easy for you, which I would suspect made you a horrible teacher without empathy for those who had to develop the skill.

          And, of course, there are the fields such as biology that rest more on a large body of knowledge than analytical skill.

          • Mike

            “it came only after long hours sweating over problem set after problem set”

            That’s exactly the point: one learns how to solve problems by solving them. How else?

    • Fat_Man

      “It is probably safe to assume that many share my view of Trump, his
      sycophants, and his supporters as openly hostile to science and
      education ignorant morons.”

      You gave it away on the last line. The campuses are political monocultures that hate the vast majority of people outside them. It will cause us no pain to shut the cesspits and confiscate all of their property.

    • Tex Taylor

      On my way to medical school, I never found myself terribly impressed with pHDs in these sciences that tooted their own horn as “scholars.” Most were Leftists masquerading as scholars who once peed themselves Obama would slow the rising tide.

      I did find many a science professor that lacked the qualities necessary for a better paying job in the corporate world as engineer or scientist. And since I made an ‘A’ in their classes, I can safely assume they thought me capable, even as Trump sycophant.

      • Mike

        “since I made an ‘A’ in their classes, I can safely assume these “scholars” thought me capable”

        Not really. It does not take much to get an A in science courses offered to pre-med students.

        • Tex Taylor

          I hate to tell you this, “scholar,” but med schools are made up many an engineering student. And almost to a person, we thought “scholars” like you pretty lame…

          By the way, I would love to put you in an Organic Chemistry class and measure how you fare. LOL. Incapable and unteachable…

          • Mike

            “I would love to put you in an Organic Chemistry class…”

            So, you did well in pre-med organic chemistry. Did they tell you it is actually a high-school level? Still, I am impressed, I truly am.

          • Tex Taylor

            Is that a fact? Well how come I took the same final your pHD Chemistry instructors did, as it all standardized? Doesn’t sound to me like you’re much in the know, “scholar.” In fact, I could provide a wager on this board you’re not nearly as smart in your field of “expertise” as you insist, yellow tooth. They never are. Want to put it to the test, “doctor?”

            Here was my experience, “scholar.” My AP Calculus class in high school was more difficult than your Calculus class in college that you “scholars” taught to all your entry level engineering students. My daughter took your “entry level” differential equations class as an elective. And unfortunately, while you were changing six paragraphs in some “engineering book” to rip the students off, she was probably making about five times what you the pHD did.

            How much higher do we need to achieve to make it your prestigious level, Oppenheimer?

          • Mike

            “I haven’t read of these “organic chemistry” classes in high school.”

            I took one. By the way, I changed my mind: judging by your juvenile insults, I don’t think you ever graduated from high school. As for reading, there is a lot of stuff you didn’t read and never will.

          • Tex Taylor

            I don’t believe a word you’ve typed. I don’t even believe you’re an engineer. Tell me which high school so I can check their curriculum. I say you’re a liar and poseur.

            I think you teach future baristas while loading them up with debt the rest of us will have to pay.

    • RedWell

      Good luck getting anyone around here to admit that campus lefties are marginal and overly represented in the press. That, of course, would require privileging systematic analysis and consistent data over anecdote. Science and rigor over polemic and narrative, in other words, are poorly understood. Grappling with cognitive dissonance (yes, just like on the left) is nonexistent.

      • Mike

        “campus lefties are marginal and overly represented in the press”

        This may well be the case, but it is irrelevant. They are merely parroting the media they trust who portray the press and the universities as been overwhelmed by the militant left.

      • Makaden

        Over-represented where? Marginal where? You haven’t made a claim with substance.

        I live in Portland. There is no crevice in this metropolitan area where lefties are marginalized, except for evangelical churches. Nor in Eugene, for that matter.

    • Mike

      Richard Johnson, below: “they are outnumbered by non-STEM faculty”

      I doubt it is the case in major research universities. I don’t have a hard data to prove it, but I can see the trend: the non-STEM departments are getting squeezed, resources and faculty positions are shifted to Science and Engineering.

      As far as STEM is concerned, the faculty job market is global. The majority of new STEM hires are actually foreigners, who don’t take sides in the American culture wars.

      The weak point in the survey you cited is its narrow focus on the ‘undergraduate teaching faculty’.

      • Richard Johnson

        From U-Wisconsin Madison:
        STEM majors now account for 40% of undergraduate degrees, up from about 35%; most of the increase was in the past 5 years [page 1]
        Since 2000, the percentage of tenured/tenured track faculty who hold appointments in STEM departments has held fairly steady near 58% of the total faculty headcount…. [page 10]

        At the same time, this data does NOT contradict the observation of a leftward trend among faculty members. Yes, STEM profs are less likely to be liberal/far leftist, but the above data says nothing about generational trends
        https://apir.wisc.edu/accountability/UWMadison_STEM_June202014.pdf

        https://heterodoxacademy.org/2016/01/09/professors-moved-left-but-country-did-not/

        • Mike

          It costs more to hire STEM faculty, a lot more. Due to severe budget cuts, UW Madison is in crisis, people are leaving it in droves. I am amazed they manage to keep the STEM/non-STEM faculty ratio steady.

          Let’s agree on the need for a more comprehensive study.

  • Che Guevara

    I’m totally OK with U.S. Red states defunding their universities. China will have an easier time competing for talent.

    • Isaiah6020

      I don’t think cutting back on the number of diversity coordinators will have a material impact

    • Mike

      It is not the states, but rather the federal government against the will of the states. I am an optimist: this time, the states will prevail.

    • Fat_Man

      Sending our political correct faculty and students to China would destroy that country.

  • FriendlyGoat

    Nothing is going on in the Pew report except the same “church gone wild” effect which elected Donald Trump (and for that matter, Vladimir Putin—-another questionable character—- in Russia.) You find large numbers of Republicans rating churches very highly and other sources of information very low. “News organizations are bad. Universities are bad. Organized labor is bad. But my pastor and the incorporated media ministries are good, good, good. They tell me ‘the truth’ about everything I need to know.”

    This social effect is not markedly different from Egypt which had a free election in 2011 and elected the Muslim Brotherhood. When we get to where a slight majority of people are so brainwashed in their religious fellowships that they reject everything else, we’ve got Trouble in River City. We’re there. This top red/blue graph in the Pew link is precisely on point at disclosing the nature of the problem.

    • Isaiah6020

      I know you can’t read this, but you are wrong AGAIN. As usual.
      You cannot perceive that people can disagree with you. They must be brainwashed.
      If you think what we have here with Donald Trump is akin to living under Muslim Brotherhood, you’ve really lost it.
      You actually have become the urine soaked bum ranting on the subway platform. Donald Trump broke you. SAD!

      • Beauceron

        “I know you can’t read this”
        Wait, what?

        • FriendlyGoat

          FG can’t read this because FG blocked Isaiah6020 and several others.
          It’s like a restraining order against stalkers. Works nicely, too.

          • Beauceron

            If they were trolling or being threatening, I understand.
            But you’re a Leftist, and I worry this may just be your solo version of “deplatforming.”
            The Left’s penchant for simply not wanting to hear- and, worse– trying to silence, those they disagree with may be the most troubling development in a year of troubling developments. It’s not healthy, and, barring the above mentioned exclusions, I would encourage you to avoid taking such actions.

          • f1b0nacc1

            Oh don’t waste your time with this one…he really isn’t worth it. I have been enjoying the peace and quiet of late, and until a few days ago, I didn’t even realize why! (grin)….

            With any luck, he will simply remove himself over time, and deplatform himself!

          • FriendlyGoat

            Dream on, oh deluded one. I write for me, not you. But if/when my commentary bothers you, block it!

          • f1b0nacc1

            How very disappointing, I had hoped that like most cockroaches, you scuttled away when light appeared, but anon…

            I limit my blocks to obvious trolls, you are (on the other hand) serious in your delusion, so unworthy of a block…

          • FriendlyGoat

            Glad you know I have better things to do than troll you. But, golly, that “cockroach” thing.
            That doesn’t work. So, being in the blocking mood, today, you’re gone too. Sorry you’ll have to return to insulting the Hillary Hags or somebody else with little enough sense to take your lip. Not me. Toodle-doo.

          • FriendlyGoat

            It’s fine with me that all these voices here write to you and you appreciate them. When they attack me on a personal level, I block ’em and tell ’em—–causing each one to find a new victim. I’ve come to realize it’s the stand-up thing to do in the comment section. I am past allowing myself to be a victim—–same mindset now inhabiting so many people who carry guns.

          • Beauceron

            OK– so you were threatened or trolled by the people you blocked?

            Or were you disagreed with? Even strenuously disagreed with?

            Your decision, of course…but perhaps a troubling one, even if it is, as I said, increasingly common in some quarters.

            For what little it may be worth, I would encourage you to use the block button sparingly. You’ll end up living in an echo chamber.

          • FriendlyGoat

            I don’t go to the grocery store required to “work with” people who walk up to me saying,
            “I hear you are a Democrat. On those grounds, I challenge you to a duel! Here and now!
            Mano-a-mano! C’mon snowflake! I’m gonna pound you right here!”

            There are laws against such things. And/or, for some, there is concealed-carry and “stand your ground”. None of us have to endure any such bullsh*t in real life. I don’t have to endure it in the comment section, and I’m not going to. We have fascinating writers here, such as WigWag, and then we have would-be bullies and nut cases. I have learned to know the difference. I’m just not screwin’ around anymore with that latter bunch.

          • Tex Taylor

            Goat is an intellectual lightweight and weasel. The great thing about him blocking when challenged as we can treat him as the clown on the dunk tank and the balls are free while he sits in oblivion. {snicker}

        • Isaiah6020

          He blocked me.

    • Boritz

      Mike Huckabee is an anti-abortion Democrat more than an actual Republican. Apart from that one issue he would be at home in the Democrat Party. They didn’t “give you” M.H. because you can have him.

      • FriendlyGoat

        Real Christians should “hear” and appreciate an anti-abortion Democrat in Huckabee. Why? Because most of the rest of Republicanism is not Christian in either tone or results.
        This is all reminiscent of the crowd which once could be whipped up to say “Give us Barabbas, crucify Jesus.”

        • Tex Taylor

          Because most of the rest of Republicanism is not Christian in either tone or results.

          What could possibly make you qualified to judge what is Christian? This is a religion you not only have little understanding, but have summarily rejected. People like you are the last person on earth worthy to judge the tone or results. You’re little more than unqualified bigotry, Goat, though you’re appropriately named.

        • Boritz

          Democrat Christianity is reminiscent of Bill getting down to prayer with Rev. Jackson to atone for his non-sexual relations (according to his studied understanding of the Bible) with that woman Ms. Lewinsky.

          • FriendlyGoat

            Some do believe things sorta like your last statement. Not me. I believe Jesus is quite real to anyone who asks, seeks or knocks INDIVIDUALLY. I believe He fixed and can fix the errors and excesses of the “religion” which came before Him and the “religion” which came after Him. I believe He can melt hard hearts in an instant. And I believe his Holy Spirit can be invited in and will come when invited. The fruit of that Spirit is kindness to other people. Tim McGraw, one of the chiseled tough guys of country music explained this in 1997 with this song:

            Without going preachy, Tim explained—–three minutes into that song—–what happened to him that was the big change. You hear me talk all the time here about being mad at “church” for what it has done politically. I’m not mad at Jesus, never was and never will be. But the problem is that church is moving away from Him, not toward Him.

          • FriendlyGoat

            I wrote you a reply to this which may not have appeared due to including a link to a YouTube video. Here it is again with directions to the link, not the link itself:

            Some do believe things sorta like your last statement. Not me. I believe Jesus is quite real to anyone who asks, seeks or knocks INDIVIDUALLY. I believe He fixed and can fix the errors and excesses of the “religion” which came before Him and the “religion” which came after Him. I believe He can melt hard hearts in an instant. And I believe his Holy Spirit can be invited in and will come when invited. The fruit of that Spirit is kindness to other people. Tim McGraw, one of the chiseled tough guys of country music explained this in 1997 with this song:

            (go to YouTube—–Look up Tim McGraw “One of These Days”)

            Without going preachy, Tim explained—–three minutes into that song—–what happened to him that was the big change. You hear me talk all the time here about being mad at “church” for what it has done politically. I’m not mad at Jesus, never was and never will be. But the problem is that church is moving away from Him, not toward Him.

    • Tom

      I’m amazed. Not once, in that entire four-paragraph comment, did you ever manage to actually engage with the argument in the post. I realize that in your world, everything is the fault of Evil Republicans, but have you ever considered the possibility that your team has its own set of problems?

    • QET

      You are trapped in the past, FG. I was on campus in the 1980s, the era of the Moral Majority, Billy Graham etc. I lived the era of the evangelical Right’s ascendancy. In terms of gravitational force it was an asteroid compared to the Jupiter that is the Left. It made absolutely no impact whatsoever on the progressive long march through the US Academy.

      Object to the Right all you want, but at least do so on the basis of its 2017 incarnation, not its 1982 incarnation. In you own words, you cannot defend if you don’t know who it is in these surveys that hates you and why they hate you.

      • FriendlyGoat

        I know that this article and your comment relate mostly to the campuses, drawing from the Pew survey. And I know some campus environments are rather zany in their dedicated leftism. To me, the big story here is the Pew study taken as a whole. It indicates that church/religion is way up with Republicans and all other secular sources of information are way down. It’s now fashionable for those who are getting their main nourishment from conservative religion to knock college, knock organized labor and knock the free press—–all at once. That is not to say that I want to argue that some college people are not zany. They are. But, the big story in America goes beyond that, just like it also does in Russia. Church plus nationalism begets “strongmen” who are questionable leadership.
        They’ve got an entrenched Putin as direct result. We got a Trump. It’s bad for real freedom both places.

        • QET

          Frankly FG, though I imagine you don’t agree, the world tends to vacillate between disenchantment and re-enchantment. Right now we are living through a re-enchantment phase. The non-libertarian Right may well source its re-enchantment in the old-time religion, but the Left has transmuted science and humanism into magic and pagan ritual. Its motivations are no less religious in nature than are the Right’s.

          The Left today–I mean the young Left, not the Left of your youth which was traditionally socialist in tendency–worships; it doesn’t think or analyze. But the problem is that traditional socialism (not social welfarism which all nations practice to some degree), so-called “scientific socialism,” was decisively discredited in the last century (and its recent excrescences merely confirm that judgment) and so there is no returning to that.

          Unions today, in the US anyway, are mostly public employee unions, not the trade unions of yore. The Right quite vehemently and correctly (in my opinion) objects to public employee unions. Trade unions just don’t matter as they once did, and are not likely to again. As for a free press, well I’m sure you appreciate, even if you don’t see it this way yourself, that the entire thrust of the Right’s objection today is that there is no free press among major media. The major press are now simply Leftist propaganda, so treating them as such is hardly “knock[ing] the free press.”

          As for strongmen, see Tom Friedman on China’s strongmen. You can object to Right-wing authoritarianism because you are on the other side, but to imagine that authoritarianism is somehow uniquely a feature of the Right is simply error, and magical thinking.

          • FriendlyGoat

            1) I’m for not destroying the (sensible) “social welfarism” which, as you put it, “all nations practice to some degree”. That, NOT Marx, is the desirable future.

            2) Trade unions remain ONLY in the public sector BECAUSE citizens allowed Republican politics to kill them in the private sector. That was a grave error. They should be everywhere, acting as the balance wheel. People who are powerless at private-sector work are now jealous of public-sector people who are not (yet) completely powerless.
            But that should not have occurred. The private sector people have no power at all and they’re mad about it—-forgetting WHY their predicament is so dire.

            3) Meanwhile, the painting of God onto both Trump and Putin and vice versa is making people really, really stupid.

          • Diws

            “the Left has transmuted science and humanism into magic and pagan ritual.” – this is the most succinct explanation of the Left’s Scientism which I have yet read. Well phrased.

          • QET

            Thanks!

        • Tex Taylor

          Perhaps it is you that needs to do a little introspection. America is in the slow process of recovery after electing a completely secular charlatan that didn’t give a hesitation to walking all over your secular Constitution. People like you ordained this magic man with messianic qualities back in 2008, slowing the rising tide and ushering in world peace.

          And after eight years of this sham and his millions of lemmings still calling him “highly respected and beloved,” the world is now broken with more refugees walking the planet than at anytime in history, the country hopelessly balkanized, our debt exorbitant and frankly unpayable, one in two families in or near poverty, and race relations nearing civil war.

          Garden variety Christian bigotry sells in certain circles as the fault of all evil. But there isn’t a place on earth better example to what you would subscribe to as cure than the college campus these days – an entity that can’t employ even one in two in the major most borrowed six figures – another debt that can’t be repaid by millions.

          • FriendlyGoat

            Since I can’t recall speaking with you before, I went to your open Disqus history for a little revelation on where you’re “coming from”.
            The expressed opposition I found there to LGBT, specifically T, was very helpful. It’s a major factor in Russia’s entrenchment of Putin, and a huge driver of “Idolize Trump, Trash Obama” here.

          • Tex Taylor

            Since I find the ‘T’ suffering from severe mental illness, it shouldn’t surprise you then that I find people like you equally deluded.

            I find your preferred entrenchment of Caesar Caligula equally revealing. What I can’t find, is what could possibly qualify you as somebody capable of judging the ‘tone’ of Christianity. You can hold an opinion, but not all opinions are of equal value either.

            I’m just waiting for a Caligula representative like you to demonstrate these good works of yours. Can you point me to the profound charity and loving kindness you apparently believe you represent?

          • FriendlyGoat

            Sure, I love and trust Jesus. Was in church for decades until it went nuts and embraced perpetual lying on nearly every political subject. I get it that you are painting a disdain for gay stuff onto your politics and economics. That will make discussion of economics with you impossible. And, because, you have introduced yourself by likening me to Caligula, I just blocked you from my view. I don’t play with drive-by shooters anymore. I just don’t. Life is too short. Bye, dude.

          • Tex Taylor

            Good, I can reply to a fool without merit without interruption and polluting my mailbox then. Were you not aware in your love for Jesus, he was not absent at Sodom? Your disconnects are mind numbing, gay and economics conflated.

            Did you demonstrate your “love for Jesus” as you booed the mention of God in the Democratic Platform? LOL

            Clearly an Obama toady and charlatan, now probably a Feel the Bern stooge. When challenged, they melt like precious snowflakes. And they might as well be wearing a flashing red light on their heads.

    • Beauceron

      “You find large numbers of Republicans rating churches/religious organizations very highly and other sources of information very low.”

      It’s rather glaring that you can’t manage to see the same thing might be happening on the Left– nor to even acknowledge the difference in power structure. Unions, the MSM, and Education are, for the most part, ensconced deep into the Left side of the spectrum. It’s a surprise the right doesn’t trust them?
      The feeding frenzy in the media since Trump has been elected has certainly woken me up, although I witnessed the same sort of partisan fury during Bush’s second term.
      But I put the educational system into a different category. Say what you will about them, Unions, the media (aside from NPR and PBS), and churches are private institutions.
      Schools are, for the most part, public institutions. That they have tipped so radically to the Left is a problem well worth addressing. One can choose to not go to church, one can avoid the media, although you may be forced to join a union, you can also avoid it. Primary and secondary education are legal requirements. You have to go. That the Left has seized those institutions is something the right should be deeply concerned about.

    • Richard Johnson

      Unfortunately for your viewpoint, I am disturbed at the recent campus trend to shout down speakers that are not ideologically approved (Middlebury, for example), but I have never been a church goer. Disclaimer: I was a member in high school of Liberal Religious Youth, the Unitarian youth group. Today, colleges and universities are less tolerant of diverse thought than they used to be. That is what is driving the increase in negative views of colleges and universities.
      In the last two decades, there has been an increase in liberal/far left faculty. Academe is Overrun by Liberals. Here’s Why that Should Disturb You. This increase in liberal/far left faculty relative to conservative faculty is driving the increase in intolerance of diverse views on campus.

  • J K Brown

    No need to arbitrarily cut funding, just tie it to enrollment and graduation rates. Once that is gamed, require competency examinations and graduate employment (like was imposed on the for-profit). Accountability is the bane of bureaucrats everywhere.

  • markterribile

    It’s hard to indulge in hyperbole against the bizarre victimology of the left. It sounds like self-parody until you feel the emotional intensity behind it. Then it becomes an insane, terrifying hunger that grows stronger with everything it consumes, the soulless malice of purpose and intent divorced from any capacity to value other human beings as anything but food for consumption.
    If you want to know what it looks like to its actual victims, find and read Robert Bloch’s horror short, =Hungry House=.

  • QET

    I was on campus in the 1980s, and my children are on campus today. I can safely and unequivocally say that the so-called “canon wars” then bear no resemblance to the culture war today save perhaps in someone’s tenure piece. The 1980s were when the Left reoccupied the Rhineland. Today is when they are in control of all of Europe and are at the gates of Moscow.

  • Angel Martin

    “If universities continue to torch their reputation with the right, they may find that some of the privileges and resources and social prestige they have become accustomed to will go up in flames as well.”

    No, no, no !

    Campus PC snowflakes. It’s all going great. Redouble your efforts to #Resist.

  • Piltdown Ghost

    Freedom of speech = anti-intellectual.
    “I need some muscle over here!” = pro-intellectual.

    Academia in a nutshell.

    I suppose as an “anti-intellectual” I should ask, “Do you want fries with that?”

  • Richard Johnson

    Why were my comments removed?

    • FriendlyGoat

      I don’t know. Has nothing to do with me. I even replied to one of them and was told your remarks were no longer active and could not receive reply as a result. Here is what I wrote to you:

      I have opined before on the speakers-at-colleges problem. To me, the solution is for secular universities to not invite either far-left or far-right individuals to do what amounts to a not-necessarily-comedic “stand-up” routine as entertainment for a niche audience.
      The colleges should always invite opposing views to appear on the same stage at the same time—–as debates. A fairness doctrine imposed, because college is supposed to be a fair-minded place.

      As for church, I was there. I went where my parents took me as a kid, then continued with it clear into mid-forties with wife and son—–several different denominations. In later life, I have come to be more aligned in thought with the Unitarians, though I do not attend there. Sweet Jesus is indeed the sweetest of concepts, until one looks around and notices that a large, large number of people you went to fellowship with are following something else almost entirely. If it’s mostly “Every Word of This Bible Is True Because It Has To Be True”, it’s time to leave. That mindset got us slavery for centuries, Calvinism for economics, misogyny galore, deep hatred of gay people, and now—–“Grab ’em by the p_____” for leadership. Not for me. Not anymore.

      • Richard Johnson

        The removal has something to do with my editing comments too many times- I would venture that three is the cutoff point- results in a comment being flagged as spam. As most of my comments involve links, and copy/pasting text into a blockquote on Disqus means that there must be substantial editing to make the blockquote look good, it is a losing venture. I am accustomed to Preview, which as far as I can tell, doesn’t exist in Disqus, which means that I must use Edit in the absence of Preview.
        Lesson: for any involved comment in Disqus, I need to used WordPress/non Discus to preview before posting in Disqus. Very clunky.

  • Jeff77450

    I’m reasonably certain that those polled didn’t mean that higher education in general is bad for America, they meant that the anti-American, anti-Western Civilization propaganda that seems to be so prevalent on campuses today is bad for America. And it is.

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