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Democrats Push Left as Midterm Campaigns Approach
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  • Isaiah6020

    I’ve said it before and I will say it again. Republicans’ and Trump’s greatest asset is how batguano insane Democrats are. For a preview of what the future looks like, look at Labour Party in the UK.
    When Maxine Waters is the spokeswoman for your movement, perhaps it is time to reconsider. I really hope no Democrat reads this post. You are doing great guys!!! Keep on wearing those Puzy Hats. They look good on you.

    • Andrew Allison

      Should we perhaps should stop telling people how batguano insane Democrats are in case they notice and start pretending to be sane? Wouldn’t it make sense to encourage them to self-destruct?

  • Anthony

    “Democrats’ goals must be bigger than Trump himself. If they are to defuse the threat of Trumpism, and help cure the rot within the Republican Party, they must win….” (How Democrats Can Roar Back) – theweek.com/articles/698174/how-democrats-roar-back

    • Isaiah6020

      And what is the threat of Trumpism? Is it whatever you want it to be, kind of like choose your own adventure?

      • Tom

        It’s the same as the threat of Obamism, albeit with less cultural force behind it–that is to say, the increasing personalization of politics, and the belief that the POTUS can do wrong as long as he is of MY party.

        • Isaiah6020

          Well, after 8 years of pen and phone, if Congress won’t act I will, and so on it is a little hard to take seriously those who discovered the value of separation of powers sometime in early November of 2016. But I agree with you, the Ceasar-fication of Presidency is a serious threat.

      • Fat_Man

        Better yet, what is Trumpism? As David Brooks wrote this morning:

        “We’ve got this perverse situation in which the vast analytic powers of the entire world are being spent trying to understand a guy whose thoughts are often just six fireflies beeping randomly in a jar.”

        https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/05/15/opinion/trump-classified-data.html

        • Isaiah6020

          It is a boogey man. Whatever you want it to be,

          • Makaden

            A human Rorschach Fascism test. You see whatever fascism you want in your opponent.

  • Makaden

    Grab the popcorn, folks. I’ve got a seat open next to me.

  • CaliforniaStark

    “If Trump’s approval rating remains stuck in the low 40s.”

    You know, he had the very same poll numbers when he got elected in November 2016. And for two years prior to that he was referred to as a crazy man who could not get elected. I did not vote for him, but a lot more people did than expected. Would not count him out yet based on polls, given their poor track record so far.

    • LarryD

      Trump voters did not so much vote for Trump as against Hillary and everything she stood for, against the corruption, against the political correctness, against the identity politics, Marxism, and Progressive smugness. Those of us who crossed their fingers when they cast their ballots have lucked out, He’s been better than we dared hope for.

      As Instapundit is fond of saying, in commenting on Progressive insanity, “You want more Trump? This is how you get more Trump.”

      • CaliforniaStark

        Agree to a point, but the massive turnout of blue collar votes, particularly in Midwest states, was more than just opposing Hillary. Here is a quote from the book “Shattered” about the Trump turnout in Florida:

        “No, Schale explained, Trump’s numbers weren’t just big, they were unreal. In rural Polk County, smack-dab in the center of the state, Hillary would collect 3,000 more votes than Obama did in 2012 — but Trump would add more than 25,000 votes to Mitt Romney’s total. In Pasco County, a swath of suburbs north of Tampa-St. Petersburg, Trump outran Romney by 30,000 votes.”

        This is more than just an anti-Hillary vote; Trump’s turnout represents a social movement which people are just beginning to understand. Would question if an “‘establishment” Republican would have been able to generate that large of a turnout. American politics will never be the same.

        • Pete

          a lot of Trump vote was anti-establishment.

        • Boritz

          I agree with your last two sentences even for Jeb in FL.

  • FriendlyGoat

    There IS NO center. There is no center-left and there is no center right. America is being steam-rolled hard right on all issues simultaneously at the federal level and in many of the statehouses. Democrats cannot be elected saying “oh, don’t worry, we’ll meet ’em in the middle, shake hands across the aisle, all be reasonable and work together (together) for the good of the country”. Republicans have proven in the Bush, Obama and Trump eras that there is no “give and take”, no “compromise” ever. They do not appreciate anything smelling of “RINO” on their own side and they do NOT meet ANY centrists in the so-called “center”. (Ask the Freedom Caucus. It will tell you what the position is.)

    So, the job of a national Dem candidate (House or Senate) is to convince a sufficient number of voters in swayable election districts that the political right is lying to them on nearly everything at all times, that they will personally lose and lose and lose and lose until they discredit and replace everybody and everything labeled “conservative”—–period. That means arguing from the hard left on economic issues, and arguing well because such arguments have to be delivered well enough to soar over the low-brow crap which will be thrown against them. The White House was arguably lost on the simple fact that Obama was better spoken “on his feet” than Hillary Clinton was. “I am a centrist” is not going to prevail much of anywhere.

    • Dale Fayda

      You are absolutely correct. The Democrats need to tack as far left as possible, as fast as possible. No defeat and no surrender! Feel the Bern! Workers of world unite!

      Go “full retard” – that’s the only way back to political relevance. The only way!

      • FriendlyGoat

        Glad we agree—-except that “retard” part. The political left actually always has benefit of the best arguments, when correctly delivered.

        • Anthony

          Saying (above0 the GOP has grown more conservative isn’t exactly news. The shift you referenced can be more likely called “hard Randian Thinking” (Ayn Rand). Still, I think your point is that the GOP has built a formidable position in American politics while moving far from the center. And, you’re correct – Republicans have managed a feat of political alchemy: turning extreme policy stances into success within a generally moderate electorate. Now, understanding how they’ve done it and how it’s affecting our constitutional order is a first step towards your improved messaging campaign.

          • FriendlyGoat

            By the time we have Congressional midterms, the GOP is going to have “disclosed itself” on a variety of issues in ways that should be energizing for leftists. We know that a lot will have already been lost, unfortunately, but we don’t know what all else will have transpired. We probably know, though, that whatever the GOP passes on health insurance (If anything), for instance, will likely be very assailable.

          • Anthony

            If it’s O.K. with you let’s continue on other thread – same subject matter – but less intrusive perhaps.

          • FriendlyGoat

            Okay.

          • Makaden

            Or in the case of Dennis Hastert, hard and randy thinking. Amiright? Badump-bump.

          • Anthony

            Hastert is long gone and what’s your point (I trust you are not kicking a dishonored former House Speaker after downfall).

          • Makaden

            My point: humor (13 year old variety)
            Your trust is misplaced. Child molesters receive scorn in perpetuity, no matter what letters follow their names. Those are my values.

          • Anthony

            That’s your view and may be shared by many but many also opt to not publicize scorn without cause (even @ 13 year old funning). Hastert’s conviction memorialized his life journey.

          • Makaden

            God almighty. Do you read your stuff out loud before you hit post? WTF does that last sentence even mean?

          • Anthony

            It means you replied to me and I courteously responded – in my initial reply I credited your humanity more than your attempt at levity. Anything else you interpret as you incline.

          • Makaden

            Apologies if I misunderstood you. From our previous exchanges, you may remember, I find your writing style a little opaque.

          • Anthony

            No problem. Permit me to suggest that if you ignore my comments then my style cease being a concern for you. Good night, my man!

          • Makaden

            Well, since you replied to me, your comment comes directly to my email, making it difficult to ignore.

          • ——————————

            The best thing to do with Anthony, is what I did…block him.
            It does show who you replied to “Anthony”, but I don’t see his fatuous utterances.

            So far you got the last word, which is unusual…he must have feel asleep sitting at his comp….

          • Anthony

            Oh, the six month crank and attention seeker could not resist Anthony’s irritant reminder of his “extreme limitations” (of course our 59 year old a** kicker takes indirect shots to avoid getting his inadequacies consistently revealed – i.e., “…’fell’ asleep…. and “repeating the obvious” – but thought limitation leaves little choice.

          • Fred

            I sympathize completely, but for me, I’d feel like I was missing out. Anthony is (unintentionally) hilarious. Just look at his three-year-old responses to my comments, which he can’t even see(!): “But you CAN’T comment to or about me! You’re BLOCKED, you stinky poopoo head! It’s not FAIR! WAAAAAAHHN!” Also, the incongruity between his pathological egomania and his intellectual vacuity is a scream in an Inspector Clousseau, Maxwell Smart kind of way.

          • seattleoutcast

            I recommend you read the Fourth Turning. What you call extreme policy stances (I don’t know why they are extreme, just dysfunctional) are simply a change in priorities.

          • Anthony

            Thanks, I read it.

        • Dale Fayda

          And I were 7′ tall, I’d be playing in the NBA. A comment just as pointless as your dissimulation on who would have won and by how much. That parallel reality doesn’t exist.

          And yes, by all means – death to the bourgeoisie, etc. Never deviate!

          • FriendlyGoat

            The thing is, after America has seen Republicans in action for a while, your caricatures of left-side arguments probably are not going to sell nearly so well. The health insurance fiasco now underway in Congress is one example of “no there there” for benefit of people. The spectacle of tax reform will be another. And, there are the various Trump dramas now in the news. ANYTHING could happen in the course of the next 18 months.

          • Dale Fayda

            “The health insurance fiasco now underway in Congress is one example of “no there there” for benefit of people.” Obamacare, anyone? Or do you still think “it’s working”?

          • Isaiah6020

            “think”

          • FriendlyGoat

            I think people are going to get a junk sandwich from this Congress on that issue and they will have the opportunity to reflect on the details of that before another election. Why would it be junky? Republican principles, of course.

          • Isaiah6020

            Republican principles are bad because they are junk. Super persuasive.

          • Dale Fayda

            No answer to my question, I see. I remember getting the same obfuscation from you before the election. Ok, let’s try this again, point blank, with no extraneous blather.

            In your opinion, is Obamacare “working”? Yes or no?

          • FriendlyGoat

            I have blocked six users on this board because I am tired of being harassed by jerks. I do not have to answer your questions. I do not have to endure your frequent attacks. If you want to be #7, carry on as per your usual self.

            The subject here is what the GOP Congress might produce on health insurance. If you know how it is going to be “great” for people, please tell us. I’m of the opinion that the ultimate long-term GOP goal is no federal policy standards and the low standards set in the worst GOP state being forced upon the other 49 for both the individual market and all the employees in groups via “across state lines”. I believe it is exactly the same principle desired for extending the gun laws of one red state to all states against the will of people in many of the states. People have a LOT to lose in both their “states’ rights” and their future protection from ruinous medical expenses. They may get the opportunity to wake up.

          • Dale Fayda

            I’ll take that as “No, I don’t think Obamacare is working”.

            See, that wasn’t so hard, was it?

          • FriendlyGoat

            I’ll take it as you didn’t need to ask me in order to inform the opinion you already have.

          • Dale Fayda

            I asked for YOUR opinion. As you have correctly pointed out, I don’t need convincing. But it was YOU who took the discussion into the realm of heath care and I was simply putting your statements into a (very recent) historical context.

          • FriendlyGoat

            It was me who was writing an original comment which drew something from you about “full retard”. I’ve been down this road too frequently with a bunch of people here and I’m not going to entertain it in the future. Life is too short for those games. I will try not to harass your original thoughts for sport. If you harass mine, I’ll let you know when I can no longer see them—–so you can then get a new victim. Six here are in my rearview mirror and it might as well be seven, eight, nine, whatever.

          • Isaiah6020

            I’m one of the blocked one. Come join us.

          • Tom

            “I have blocked six users on this board because I am tired of being harassed by jerks.”

            Have you ever considered the old saying “If you meet a jerk in the morning, you met a jerk. If the only people you meet all day are jerks, you’re the jerk”?

          • f1b0nacc1

            One of my favorite Demotivators (check out Despair.com if you are interested…they are VERY funny) is “The one common factor in all of your failed relationships is YOU”….I suspect that our friend the Goat could learn much from that…

          • Tom

            Despair.com is hilarious. And also true.

          • f1b0nacc1

            I am glad that you enjoy it….it has been a favorite of mine since the 90s

          • Jim__L

            I tried visiting despair.com … but all the graphics and links are broken. 🙁

          • f1b0nacc1

            Just saw that myself…perhaps it is my blocker….

          • Jim__L

            Seemed fitting, somehow.

          • f1b0nacc1

            Now this morning it is working….go figure?

          • Boritz

            Despair looks like a great diversion website that I’m sure does much good. You should check out Fantastically Dangerous Capacitor Bank Experiments, but as they warn don’t try this at home.

          • f1b0nacc1

            Many thanks! I have just glanced at this, but it looks like tons of fun…

          • FriendlyGoat

            The Goat has learned to cut the number of relationships down to the ones worth having. This is a harder thing to do when young for all kinds of practical reasons, but at 65 it’s not hard at all. For instance, by design, I’ve never joined Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or Classmates. Never will. In comment sections, people either appreciate my thoughts or they don’t. Some occasionally do. For the ones who don’t, I’m done with wasting time and energy responding to their drive-by gunfire.

            You wouldn’t be interested in knowing this, but I’ll tell you anyway. In real life, I’m not living with the ramifications of any “failed relationships”.
            Seriously, none. Not neighbors, not ex-lovers, not relatives, not business associates, not social backfires. Since that part is peaceful, I’ve stopped pretending that entertaining feud-prone counterparties online is a good idea. It isn’t.

          • f1b0nacc1

            Why would you think I assume that your life is an unhappy one? I certainly don’t wish you ill, you are far too amusing for that!

          • FriendlyGoat

            One only does that after he is talked about in the third person. Seriously, you may recall John Boehner, who one day walked to the podium singing Zippety-doo-dah because he claimed to have just gotten up saying “Today’s the day (I’m going to resign from this mess)”. Well, not long ago I decided that if my conversation partners turn out to be pests who mostly want to have word fights, I’m gonna block ’em and fuggedaboud ’em. Six are gone now.

            As for you guys being amused together, have a nice time in snark land. When I was a kid I never hung out with those dedicated to the malicious derision of other kids, and it’s silly to try doing anything similar as an adult. As I told you earlier, this is all so much easier to manage as an old guy once one makes the choice. As Alfred E. Newman said, “What, me worry?”

          • f1b0nacc1

            Enjoy yourself, but why did you think I would care about this?

          • FriendlyGoat

            Lucy from Peanuts thought she could offer Psychiatric Help (sometimes Counseling Help) for five cents. You think you’re selling me some at that price—–and I just sold you some. Toodle-doo.

          • D4x

            So NOTself-aware, Goat fails to recognize his malicious derision, when he writes “church people”. Goat blocked me for requesting he stop replying to my comments, a sign he also can not see he is the one throwing word fights in his futile attempt to persuade us of our heresies. I just could not see the point of trying to communicate with someone who fails reading comprehension. That was back when I replied to him by posting PM May’s exact words on why UK had made a mistake in abstaining on UNSC Res 2334.

            The tragedy is he proves the impossibility of any kind of civil discourse in American politics, 2017 -.

          • f1b0nacc1

            I am not sure I agree with your last point. While FG and that pompous twit Anthony really are beyond hope, I am unconvinced that there is no basis for civil discourse at all any more. Perhaps you are right, but (and I suppose it is my optimistic nature here) I prefer to believe that they are the extreme fringe, rather than the norm. I don’t have to agree with someone to be civil, and while that is harder to find that it used to be, it isn’t extinct yet….

            Anyway, here’s hoping…

          • Makaden

            Sure, they are “fringes” in the same way that the ocean is the fringe of an island.

          • f1b0nacc1

            Well, they are all wet, so you have me there…

          • D4x

            The extreme fringe would not be commenting at TAI, not in their way. I shall believe there is a future for civil discourse when I see signs of civility from the neoDems in this Congress.

            Hard to understand why FG prefers to see so many blocked comments. I blocked him for a few seconds, and this page looked like a redacted CIA doc.

            You should read some of the comments at https://www.the-american-interest.com/2017/05/09/russias-imperial-amnesia/ Quite a lesson in the long memories of Ukrainian nationalists, vying with the Catholic Irish for ‘worst imperialist experience in history’. Not much civility.

          • f1b0nacc1

            The loons will become civil when the rest of us demand it, and not before. “The Twins” (my private nickname for them) get to live out their fantasy of speaking truth to power, or spreading the good word to the heathen, but ultimately they are pretty much engaged in a sort of self-indulgent variety of mutual verbal masturbation. I don’t really mind, and they are welcome to it as long as it doesn’t interfere with the rest of the discourse. I see the threads where they are too deeply involved and I simply skip over them, I assume that they do the same with me. Live and let live, after all…

            And you are right, some of the threads become fascinating exercises in who was most victimized….like that is a competition anyone really wants to win. It puts me to mind of the famous Four Yorkshiremen sketch…

          • D4x

            Cross-posted: “Former Radical Describes Leftist Activism as ‘Cult,’ Saw ‘Murderous Rage”
            By Tom Knighton May 16, 2017

            [Keri Smith] “…I see increasing numbers of so-called liberals cheering censorship and defending violence as a response to speech. I see seemingly reasonable people wishing death on others and laughing at escalating suicide and addiction rates of the white working class. I see liberal think pieces written in opposition to expressing empathy or civility in interactions with those with whom we disagree. I see 63 million Trump voters written off as “nazis” who are okay to target with physical violence. I see concepts like equality and justice being used as a mask for resentful, murderous rage.

            The most pernicious aspect of this evolution of the left, is how it seems to be changing people, and how rapidly since the election. I have been dwelling on this Nietzsche quote for almost six months now, “He who fights with monsters, should be careful lest he thereby become a monster. And if thou gaze long into an abyss, the abyss will also gaze into thee.” How easy is it for ordinary humans to commit atrocious acts? History teaches us it’s pretty damn easy when you are blinded to your own hypocrisy. When you believe you are morally superior, when you have dehumanized those you disagree with, you can justify almost anything. In a particularly vocal part of the left, justification for dehumanizing and committing violence against those on the right has already begun.

            I have been wondering why more people on the left are not speaking up against violence, in favor of free exchange of ideas and dialogue, in favor of compassion. But I know why. I was in the cult.”

            The author, Keri Smith, sees something that many of us have witnessed from the outside: the Left is openly embracing violence against their enemies, seeking to destroy political rivals, rejecting the civil society.

            https://pjmedia.com/trending/2017/05/16/former-radical-describes-leftist-activism-as-cult-saw-murderous-rage/

          • f1b0nacc1

            I read that yesterday, and enjoyed it a great deal. What was almost as interesting was reading the comments section…

            Not terribly surprising to see the Left turning to violence. This is what spoiled children do when they are frustrated, and the Left is nothing if not spoiled and childish…

          • D4x

            It’s a tough crowd – they really can not stand McMaster.
            I want TAI read this one.

          • ——————————

            No FG, the Dems are not going to gain anything in 2018, actually they are going to lose a bit more.
            Much of your party is viewed by many as nuts…dancing like animals in protests in the streets. Also, extreme distrust of the liberal media and Hollywood, and a platform based on identities. This will not work for them, it will work against them…fact.

            And if you think I am wrong, then copy and paste this comment onto a Word document with the title ‘TAI guy’s 2018 election prediction’, and save it for election day….

          • FriendlyGoat

            You are entitled to your predictions. For the time being, I’m going to stick with “anything can happen” in the coming months to negatively affect Americans’ view of conservatism.

          • D4x

            Add stable price of gas, and job creation steady+, as long as they keep resisting and screaming, in costume, with $15/hour as their primary economic platform, I’m with what TAI Guy wrote 🙂

          • ——————————

            “in costume”

            Vaginas, was it not?

          • Boritz

            “Republicans in action”

            Now there is an improbable phrase.

          • FriendlyGoat

            For “im” words, I’d choose improvident.

          • seattleoutcast

            Ah, FG. Need I remind you that my friend is thousands of dollars in debt thanks to Obamacare?
            Need I remind you my deductible went up to 7,000 under Obamacare?
            I know people without insurance because they can no longer afford it.

          • FriendlyGoat

            The question is what your friend and everyone else is gonna get, if anything.

          • seattleoutcast

            You refuse to admit Obamacare was a failure.

          • FriendlyGoat

            I am trying to be forward-looking to what comes next. Every time I contemplate $100 per month per person insurance being necessarily designed to cover not more than $900/yr claims per person on average, I get stuck. Ditto $200/mo/pp premium and $1800/yr/pp claims. The idea that “across state lines” insurance (their only idea other than HSA’s for people with lots of money) will make coverage both good and cheap simply is not credible. Sure PPACA has problems. I just don’t think Republicans are going to pass anything people like—–basically because they can’t.

        • seattleoutcast

          Reagan would easily have won a third term too. Just sayin 🙂

          • FriendlyGoat

            Mrs. Reagan knew why Mr. Reagan should/could not have been running for a third term, even if allowed.

          • seattleoutcast

            You missed my point. I meant that you rail against republican policies and how these policies will eventually be their downfall, but Reagan would have won a third term. If you want us to believe Obama would have won a third term than you must also admit Reagan would have won a third.

          • FriendlyGoat

            Maybe, although, He was not up to it mentally —–not a slam, just a sad fact.

          • D4x

            Reagan DID technically win a third term, when his VP GHW Bush was elected in 1988. Usually, the mood as to ‘right v wrong direction’ is a good predictor, yet I have no idea why that predictor broke down in 2000, except…the Internet:
            http://www.gallup.com/poll/1669/general-mood-country.aspx

            I took a graduate class in the History of the Presidency in 2004. We used a political science model based on opposition or approval of policies. Can not remember the title, or authors, but it was a good, different way, of assessing Presidential ‘greatness’. Mostly, I remember the expression on the professor’s face when he got a 50/50 response as to whether Bush43 was the greatest or worst president ever.

      • Isaiah6020

        Your sarcasm was lost. Comrade FriendlyGoat sincerely believes that socialism needs to be just explained better. There’s no arguing with stupid.

        • Andrew Allison

          Blindly fanatical is not the same as stupid, c.f. AGW

    • Isaiah6020

      Oh please please PLEASE do that. I hope you personally take the initiative and tell the Democrats how they must spew some good old fashioned Leninist slogans. Now that’s the kind of hard left turn most people surely would want. Brilliant!!
      And then we will all wonder how Democrats blew another winnable election…. Comrade FriendlyGoat will be confused, that’s for sure. The fact that Labor Party in the UK followed his advice and is now irrelevant is not something he is able to process.

    • Tom

      “So, the job of a national Dem candidate (House or Senate) is to convince a sufficient number of voters in swayable election districts that the political right is lying to them on nearly everything at all times, that they will personally lose and lose and lose and lose until they discredit and replace everybody and everything labeled “conservative”—–period.”

      So, in other words, their job is to lie. Vigorously.

  • D4x

    Screaming, boycotting, death threats: NOT a winning strategy. Obama’s second term revealed the real “transformation”, the intolerance of alleged ‘progressives’. They lost 2016 (and 2018) when it became clear that ONLY black lives matter. Look what happened to O’Malley, Bernie, and HRC when they tried to say “all lives matter”.

    • Ed O’Brien

      Philadelphia (Democratically controlled since 1952) and a self-styled “sanctuary city” evidently just decided it hadn’t gone far left enough. Where winning the Democratic primary is tantamount to winning the general election (kinda like the Jim Crow Democratic controlled “Solid South” of the last century), the Philadelphia Democrats just nominated themselves a George Soros backed and funded “civil rights” attorney with zero prosecutorial experience as DA. http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2017/05/larry-krasner-district-attorney-philadelphia-reformer “‘Nuff said.”

  • victoria wilson – mn

    The left has been playing this ideological card game- whoever’s hand holds the cards with the highest social ideals is in a position to win. Whether it be to increase minimum wage, increased medical coverage, increased restrictions under the guise of environmental protection- the candidate with the most generous package will trump the other candidates on ideological perseverance. No matter that the new immigrant businessman are voicing concern that the wage requirement will put them out of business; no matter that more than 60,000 middle class working families in MN fore went medical insurance because they couldn’t see paying 25K a year in premium (there was a relief bill that could have adjusted this); no matter that our highest unemployment rates are in northern MN where a mining concern could support families if regulations would allow them. If a candidate for office is willing to point out that we all make choices with a relative consideration to ideals; that though we would like everyone in the world to be fed, be clothed and have a chance at success, it would be to the least benefit of the world to drop everything and focus on that one ideal, and to the most benefit of the world to work within the relative confines of our resources and abilities to strive towards multiple ideals. If a candidate varies from the ultimate activist’s voice, the opponent simply plays their trump card- outrage that anyone would possibly forgo the ideal and hurt the underdog.
    And this is how we ended up with an outrageous Trump on our hands.

    • Makaden

      I don’t think the cards indicate the highest social ideals. I think they indicate the moral high ground. Those sound similar, but on closer inspection, they warrant distinction. If your cause is understood as a moral good, it can be concretized into a human right with just a few word plays and retweets. Self-righteousness has become a virtue, and, as it has generated so many times in history, self-righteousness encourages vilification and demonization of one’s opponents. That’s the cultural side. The rest of your post, IMO, points to an economic factor–which is, who can give the most free things away. The number of households that operate without even knowledge of how a family budget works probably corresponds nicely to those who feel like the government should be giving them more shit–and that shit as a “right.” And as you point out, the outrage of the prophets is a justified response when one is bathed in self-righteousness. We should never discount just how good it FEELS to be both outraged and morally right at the same time.

  • Jacksonian_Libertarian

    There’s a huge difference between the rioting Leftist thugs attacking Trump supporters, and the responsible people of the TEA Party who left their rally locations cleaner than they found them. So, the TEA Party inspired wave elections of 2010, 2014, and 2016, aren’t going to be repeated by the leftists in the 2018 midterms, despite a history of midterm losses for the in power party. The Angry working class voters of 2016 are still angry. I can see leftist dominated cities moving further to the left. But, at the State and Federal level, and outside the leftist enclaves, the Democrats will continue their down trend. No responsible person wants hysterical politicians making decisions for them. One look at Venezuela, and leftist policies can be seen as epic failures.

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