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the 45th president
100 Days in and the Reichstag Hasn’t Burned Yet
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  • Beauceron

    “There have been no mass arrests of peaceful protestors.”

    Ummmm…there have not even been mass arrests of violent protesters.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/d2e90f75454434a6dbbf9e2f739c8e9c3b3e5846aed81392208368749be62a12.jpg

    • Tom

      What do you call what happened after the ruckus in DC?

    • Jim__L

      If their side thinks War is standing around in large, unarmed groups in public places, I don’t think whoever they’re at war with has a lot to worry about.

  • Could you have set a lower bar?

    • Dan Kearns

      It’s the bar most members of my (red state) family were working from, along with essentially all of my (deepest blue state) work colleagues. And, I think you can check back to see it is near the bar set by the NYT & WP. It’s probably an even higher bar than set by the New Yorker, New York Review of Books, or (from what I could take before bailing) Slate. They are pretty much all on the record and can be checked. I think this one is pretty representative:
      http://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/an-american-tragedy-2

      • D4x

        That WAS the day-after clarion call for the ‘resistance’. Yesterday, Wintour has spoken, quite diplomatically (politics at halfway mark): https://www.businessoffashion.com/articles/people/president-wintour-part-1
        Hope Mr. Mead reads that, too.

        Also hope Remnick’s head (metaphorically) explodes. He ruined TNY for me. A 40-year pleasure of fine, thought-provoking writing.

  • ——————————

    “and will wonder why nobody listens the next time they cry “Wolf.””

    Except for left-wing loons, nobody was listening this time either…most of us were just laughing with pity and disgust….

  • Suzy Dixon

    Two main issues trump needs to focus on at home and abroad (in this order) along with an alternative #2 before the midterms to be wildly successful and keep promises.
    At home:
    1. Tax cuts/tax reform
    2. Border wall/immigration reform
    Alt. Healthcare
    Abroad:
    1. Trade imbalances/bad trade deals.
    2. Make sure the military has the funds it needs for modernization of many different platforms that have been put off.
    Alt. Support allies !and! parse out who are real friends vs users and abusers (there seem to be an abundance of these in Europe)

    • Jim__L

      Right now the military is scrounging around Silicon Valley in an attempt to get a bit of the magic there to solve “some of their biggest challenges”. Few on either side of that discussion are willing to admit that a lot of what Silicon Valley has done has simply been pick the low-hanging fruit made available by advances in computer science, and so are unlikely to help out with challenges that aren’t made more tractable by those advances in computer science.

      When Moore’s Law finally plateaus, technology with only military applications will catch up. (Unless DoD is willing to offer salaries that are competitive in Silicon Valley, which trust me, it isn’t at this point.) Until then, the frontline fighters most creative and effective in their use of off-the-shelf consumer electronics will be worth their weight in gold.

    • Unelected Leader

      Yes some of the modernization efforts, including nuclear modernization, have been put off by three successive presidents! I don’t know about you, but I care a lot more about the military’s needs than I do for an oil baron or Elon Musk… all riding the government gravy train.

  • D4x

    I would not bet on any of those “Trump-Hitler folks [who] made buffoons of themselves” emerging smarter. They are digging a sinkhole to Siberia.

  • Boritz

    Wouldn’t we get essentially this same article about Hillary if she had won? As long as the country doesn’t resemble the one depicted in The Walking Dead you can always write this kind of thing about any president.

    • Dan Kearns

      We must have read different predictions for what Mr. Trump would do right after the election. You didn’t see any “ne plus ultra” commentators pulling out their hair in a way different from any other election in a generation or two?

  • Anthony

    WRM, what reasonable/responsible American was prophesying apocalyptic doom (Grifters and Mountebanks not withstanding)?

    Presidents come and go, the Institution remains – your outlook ought to be four years out and then assess our country’s political/economic/social health. I (and certainly many other concerned Americans) wish the country success and by extension the President.

    • Dan Kearns

      I’d say the well-respected editor of the New Yorker has not usually been considered a grifter or mountebank:
      http://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/an-american-tragedy-2

      • Anthony

        I’m not sure I understand your point but David Remnick’s politics and electoral leanings are and have been well known. WRM’s reference to both grifters and … was probably less specific but you conclude where you predispose. (thanks for link but article read last year)

        • Dan Kearns

          That’s an excellent piece! Thank you for pointing it out! I think the distinctions he points out are very, very key. I also, as a nice bonus, happen to agree with his conclusion. 🙂

          • Anthony

            My pleasure, I’m glad you found it useful and you’re welcome.

    • Jim__L

      Sadly, it seems that you don’t read FG’s comments either. =(

      Or Pait’s.

      • Anthony

        theweek.com/articles/695339/100-days-trump-worst-populism-worst-establishment -despite post being 48 hrs. old

  • Jeff77450

    The argument could be made that the single greatest faux pas that a president can commit is initiating a war-of-choice that has significant cost & casualties, by the standards of the times, and that ends badly. Examples include LBJ & Vietnam and GWB & OIF. The casualties from Vietnam & OIF are small compared to the Civil War or WWII, especially when expressed as a percentage of the population, but when combined with the cost, the duration and the unsatisfactory endings they become significant. (Grossly mismanaging the ending of a war, as BHO did, is almost as bad as initiating a war-of-choice).

    I didn’t vote for DT or HC believing them both to be morally & ethically unfit to serve as president. (I wrote-in Evan McMullin). But if DT can avoid a major foreign policy disaster and if his policies actually contribute to economic growth–as opposed to a good economy that would’ve happened regardless of who was president–then he might go down in history as an improvement over his two immediate predecessors. Someone offered the opinion that it takes at least a decade after a president has left office to “digest” his accomplishments and render a verdict.

  • Isaiah601

    What WRM describes is commonly knows as TDS. There is no known cure.

  • mbermangorvine

    Yet.

  • PCB

    “Others, many others” will take credit for nothing happening insisting it was their “clarion calls” that deterred the Administration from pursuing its fascist agenda. That will seek our gratitude.

    • Jim__L

      Of course we should be grateful. It feels ever so good to laugh, and the louder and longer, the better. =D

  • Pait

    Malice tempered only by incompetence. Might become a lot worse if the doomsayers quiet down.

    • Jim__L

      Yes, because the only thing standing between us and certain DOOM is the loudness of the melting snowflakes.

      Where do you get this stuff? =D

    • Anthony

      The incompetence, Pait, is generally obfuscated. Woeful little general knowledge but alas we are where we are.

      • Pait

        I was astonished at the amount of debate over a so-called “plan” that didn’t show more than a half hour’s worth of thought. Really, they didn’t have the competence to write down some proposed legislation in 100 days? And people debate as if the bullet points were real proposals?

        • Anthony

          I think you’re referencing the “tax plan” of one page, yes? What we are witnessing is an attempt to make the abnormal normal – and there are many willing participants in this staging.

    • RedWell

      Exactly. Hitler comparisons are always overdrawn. Just as they were against GW and against Obama.

      What is embarrassing is that allegedly informed commentators like WRM use that straw man as a baseline. It’s like conservatives savaging Obama because some liberals were convinced that he would be a socialist messiah.

      The simple fact is that Trump is too incompetent to become an authoritarian. On the other hand, that incompetence could either prove benign or dangerous over the long term. We just don’t know.

      • Pait

        Let’s hope you are right. There are many somewhat competent people who feel empowered by his bluster to realize the authoritarian dreams they had always been ashamed of making public.

  • Would be interested in Meade’s take on this take on what is not happening: https://goo.gl/UVJ9ER Me, I have no idea how Washington really works anymore. All I want is third-world trade and immigration reform, and I am willing to wait four years, or even eight years if that is what it takes.

  • FriendlyGoat

    Relax, liberals. At 100 days, Gorsuch has not swung a single decision (except maybe an execution), so he never will, right? Ginsburg, Breyer, Sotomayor, Kagen or Kennedy have not retired or passed away, so they won’t in the next 1360 days, right? There were no military crises or over-reactions, so we can expect none in the future, right? Health insurance policies are still in effect, so you can keep any benefits you have now indefinitely, right? Your bosses and betters didn’t get a single tax-cut dollar yet with which to downgrade your relevance, so they never will, right? There have been few budget cuts which affect you, so they’ve all given up on the idea, right? The stock market has been declared a permanent bull, right?

    We made it to 100 days—–so—— YOU have nothing at all to be concerned about.

    • Jim__L

      Right! Instead of over-the-top predictions of disaster, Democrats should all depend on the old standby, Ominous Predictions Of Doom. (Doom I Say! Doom!)

      Honestly, some of us are looking forward to RBG laying down her burdens, and consider that to be a benefit to all concerned. =) Not really feelin’ any doom at all. Not even like the doom that was my health care premiums, skyrocketing under Obamacare — which downgraded my relevance at least as much as anyone else’s tax cuts, ever.

      And the budget is likely to be good to people like me, who have done quite a bit of suffering under Obama. So again, not feelin’ the Doomy Doom Doom that FG here is going on about.

      • Tom

        I’m just curious–who hasn’t FG blocked, besides Anthony?

        • Jim__L

          Others who agree with him, no doubt. There’s not much you can do about people who simply don’t want to be exposed to ideas outside their bubble.

    • Anthony

      FG, if I were advising the Democratic Party for both the 2018 and 2020 election cycle, I would suggest the party develop 3 or 4 big policy ideas and utilize them in response to developing situations (most importantly, tailor those 3 or 4 ideas to benefit/improve the lives of most average Americans generally).

      • Jim__L

        The Democrats have written off the average American as hopelessly irrelevant in today’s cosmopolitan world. Only the techies at the top matter; the poor should be given government-subsidized servants’ quarters (as long as they know to stay in their place. And, according to Bill Nye the Eugenics Guy, not reproduce.)

        It’s a good thing we have elections, and it’s a good thing Democrats lose so many of them. =)

        • Anthony

          Well said. And if the 3 or 4 big policy ideas are not completely electorally effective, losses happen. But, force the ball down the field (excuse sports metaphor as I am aware of your sentiment) and let the nation recognize the difference – and continue to work to change that current narrative: hopelessly irrelevant…

          • Jim__L

            Oooh, another link presented without comment or explanation! Just what everyone on the web loves!

          • Anthony

            You’ve been here long enough and ought to remember if you actually care that any link I provide you is related to something you need to know (as I told you numerous times via internet). But, you’re stubborn so I’ll continue accordingly.

          • Jim__L

            Anthony, after several of your links turned out to have nothing at all to do with the discussion at hand (and to just be Lefty babble to boot), I started asking you to provide a brief comment justifying the time I’d spend reading them. It’s a reasonable enough request.

          • Anthony

            One last time (because you’re so stubborn – tea & snark), I give you links because they are related to “whatever’ you’re trying to address to me. Now, if you fail to see connection or find them fruitless, hey…. I’ve told you when you reply to me I’ll send you to a link (it’s your choice to use or not but that’s all you get from me.

          • Jim__L

            Anthony, in the time it takes you to come up with something like this, you could write a couple of lines that say what your links are about. You’re just making excuses… are you as bored with that as the rest of us are?

          • Anthony

            Simple (more than two (2) years now), obviously I choose not to. And whatever ” rest” (the formless “they”) you’re referencing who gives a … (as I’m sure that audience can delight in your commentary or links.)

        • Angel Martin

          The Democrat agenda is what the “progressive” agenda has been for decades: sodomy, dope, abortion and open borders.

          • Jim__L

            You must hate puppies, unicorns, rainbows, and happiness if you think any of those have any drawbacks that a sane moral system might object to.

          • Angel Martin

            “if you think any of those have any drawbacks that a sane moral system might object to.”

            Call me crazy… 🙂

            Angel’s definition of insanity is to repeat all the mistakes of Ancient Rome while expecting a different result.

      • FriendlyGoat

        With the present alignment at the national level, there is really nothing that a 2018 Dem candidate for House or Senate can promise as a “doable” other than maybe to partially close Trump’s barn door after almost all horses are already lost and gone——and that is only by flip of a whole chamber anyway. Policy proposals are nice, but Dems ain’t passin’ any in 2017, 2018, 2019, or 2020.

        • Anthony

          I think you may have missed my point FG as the partisan fervor sometimes dismisses the strategic in contempt for the perceived target. The proposals are for the American people’s public consumption: policy ideas (passionately articulated) to demarcate what party plans are for the governing health of America – if losses (electorally) occur that’s politics. But an articulation of 3 or 4 big policy ideas at least establishes a framework.

          Elections in our democracy are contested. Legislation comes with a majority (as you well know). You can either quip about the open barn door online or you can actually “get in the game” and make your dissatisfaction actualized.

          Here’s a related thought: “Does that mean we’re doomed to remain in this endless cycle of reactionary politics….I wish I could say I knew the answer. What all of us want, of course, is for the cycle to stop at the moment where our side is on top. Whichever side you’re on, you probably won’t be that lucky.” theweek.com/articles/694540/america-endless-cycle-reactionary-politics

          • FriendlyGoat

            Yes, we are doomed to remain in a cycle of reactionary politics, except to the extent that one of the sides may be no longer capable of mounting a credible reaction because too many horses got completely away—-Supreme Court, voting rights, redistricting, regulatory framework, campaign finance, church in politics, effective tax code, systemic risk—–up to nuclear war (we hope not).

            I’m not against considering the messaging of some over-riding policy themes or ideas. Rather than the Democrats telling us, we had better tell the Democrats. Problem is—–after concerns about race, gender, economic welfare, policy truth, environment, global peace and global progress failed to resonate against God, guns and gays, nobody I know of has much of an idea what the fresh messaging is supposed to be other than “Are we noticing yet that we have been had?”

          • Anthony

            I’m there as I’ve ever been – let’s do the telling! And as you infer the other side is not playing by Marquess of Queensbury methods. But do not underestimate (as I know you don’t) the patience of the right (horses out of the barn end – a use of your metaphor if I might) to work at getting better placed to influence U.S. governing (and institutions). Simply stated, FG, it’s about “power” – the power of the right to have its view prevail.

            Here’s something sent to me that underscores one of your points: “Some liberals don’t seem to understand the American right is openly working to take control of academia and the media, under the guise of removing the ‘liberal bias’ which they’ve succeeded in persuading the masses exists now. They’re going to use their new political power to help in this fight, and they’ll succeed unless liberals recognize what’s going on and mobilize to fight back.”

            Recognize being had, FG, requires understanding that on some level there will never be any satisfying the right wing – that they will try to use liberal values against liberals whenever they can and it advantages their position. The fight (the notice you reference that warrants attention) is on but the complacent must be organized to fight back (as they also must realize the fight will not always be by Marquess of Queenbury methods). Keep messaging until the right one clicks and stay in the fight (you’re needed).

          • FriendlyGoat

            We’re all needed. The quote in your middle paragraph is quite resonant. We are well into being nationally brainwashed that “news” is fake, “education” is elite nonsense, and “social justice” is only the imaginary province of “warrior” fools.

          • Anthony

            The quote was provided by someone just as fierce as you (but on another field). To your last query, if you think about it carefully, you answer the question you rhetorically asked. 1980 is almost two (2) generations removed – think about that for a moment.

          • FriendlyGoat

            Indeed. We accidentally got Bill Clinton and more purposefully got Barack Obama, but the termites were eating the house down the whole time.

          • Anthony

            Your metaphors these last couple of days have been quite charming. But, the assessment is on target – attention must be paid to details (small stuff that’s really not small at all).

          • FriendlyGoat

            Those individual termites are small and there are a lot of them. Not that barn doors, horses and termites are going to work, but metaphors are messaging. The key now in that game is thinking about metaphors before they are launched and choosing only those that are the most “flip-proof”. And yes, crazy as it sounds, alliteration and rhyme can even matter. Aside from visions of fidgeting, there is an extra reason why we react to “ants in your pants”. Fleas might be about the same, but we never repeat that as a saying, do we?

          • Anthony

            Alliteration and Rhyme are important tools for your messaging delivery. However, recognizing the aim and short/long-term purposes (as well as “real” interests you’re opposing) may help congeal the message sans repeating exercise).

          • FriendlyGoat

            Today, there is the problem that we all have so much messaging that all of it has a short shelf life. Oldsters may remember “I like Ike”, nonetheless.

          • Anthony

            The key, FG, is not to let the noise interfere with the signal and to adamantly cut off invective BS (whether issuer is knowing or unknowing, persistent or naturally irritating, trolling or cesspool slumming). You have said it well elsewhere: life is too short so messaging the right way in the right circumstances among the right audience must be forefront. Remember why you’re standing and operate accordingly – now no one says it’s easy as I have shared with you on Berger’s post

          • Jim__L

            How about you get the point that your message is inherently flawed, and no amount of lipstick is going to make a silk purse out of the sow’s ear, and no amount of lipstick is going to improve the whole Lefty pig?

            That would be a better use of everyone’s time and efforts.

          • Anthony

            See, that’s it; you have a virtual personal problem (as you cannot begin to assert you know me). Don’t read my so-labeled flawed message – as I have never completely read any of yours Jim; nothing personal just that I know there’s nothing in it for me. Now if I may, Elijah Mvundura on Peter Berger’s most recent post has a “time enduring” piece of wisdom (that truly deserves more light) that you ought to reread as it relates to catalyst of “Pride”. So as I told you upon your return two years ago, there’s nothing you and I have to exchange online. I’m done here Jim and hope you reread Elijah’s human contribution while finding someone less flawed to pester. Most importantly, Jim, you got more than a Link this time (you will not as fortunate next time).

          • Jim__L

            There’s a different solution here rather than simply, “the power of the right to have its view prevail”.

            That solution is Liberty.

            Remove the winner-take-all nature of our laws by reducing the stakes in national contests, and revive true Federalism. Instead of having a bureaucrat in DC decide that his will is going to prevail over hundreds of millions of us, we have individuals and organizations at the local level have their own views prevail, because DC is being very properly told to stay the h**l out of it.

            More people will “have their will prevail” if they’re allowed to make decisions for their own states, counties, cities, communities, families, and selves. And yes, our own schools, universities, and media.

            People just aren’t going to stand for all of this totalitarian Politically Correct nonsense that the Left tries to push on everyone. That’s how Trump won. Best to simply let the vast majority of issues (aside from borders, foreign policy, and military) be state-level or metro-level issues.

            That’s Liberty. The alternative — Power, or simply an Orwellian contest to decide which boot is going to stomp whose face forever — is, honestly, evil. The only reason you could be pushing for that is a totalitarian impulse on your part. The only good thing about that is it lets everyone oppose you with a clear conscience.

          • Anthony

            GO AWAY!

          • Fred

            And so the cowardly prick who thinks he’s superior but deep down feels his own lack of gray matter blocks someone else who calls him out on his BS. I’m gonna have a heart attack and die from NOT surprise.

      • Angel Martin

        “FG, if I were advising the Democratic Party for both the 2018 and 2020 election cycle, I would suggest the party develop 3 or 4 big policy ideas …”

        Ask Obama. He gets $400K per speech from Wall Street, so he must have some good ideas…

        • Anthony

          Kruger-Dunning.

  • Jim__L

    Here’s a take on Trump’s first hundred days by a woman with a college degree — who, as Tina Fey apparently pointed out, only went for Hillary by about 5 points, instead of all voting the way they were supposed to.

    http://thefederalist.com/2017/04/27/five-ways-suburban-moms-rate-trumps-first-100-days/

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