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The Glory of God and the Refreshing of the Mind
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  • WigWag

    Happy Easter to Nick Gallagher; his classical music reviews are a gift to all TAI readers.

    Of the two, I prefer St. Matthew’s Passion to St. John’s Passion. I had the pleasure of being in the audience for Peter Sellars staged version of Bach’s masterpiece a few years ago with Simon Rattle conducting. It was an event so riveting that I will never forget it. I managed to find a review in case Nick is interested. See,

    https://www.google.com/amp/www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/10/27/atonement-2/amp

    • Jim__L

      “Whether or not the musicians or producers believe in God, they do
      believe in Bach, who, after all, is entitled to all of the credit for
      his masterpieces.”

      That’s not who Bach gives the credit to.

      Soli Deo Gloria

      • WigWag

        Good point!

        • solstice

          He made an excellent point in demonstrating the narcissism and solipsism of theism. I have also heard NBA and NFL stars credit god for their talents (in their modesty, they love to do so in front of TV cameras), but when thousands of children die everyday from diarrhea or when psychopaths commit horrific acts of evil, the same kinds of people absolve god of any guilt (usually by invoking the free will of humanity “defense”) and claim that “god is mysterious.” If god deserves credit for Bach’s music or Mariano’s pitching accomplishments, then the logical corollary is that he also deserves credit for Ted Bundy’s sadistic, serial killing achievements (he is, after all, one of the most charismatic and talented serial killers of all time). To claim otherwise, as Sam Harris has noted, is equivalent to “playing tennis without a net”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QuPsxFklxaw

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