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Poverty and Violence
How Blue America Is Failing Black Americans

One of America’s bluest cities has found a way to keep kids safe, at least some of the time. With shootings in Chicago up 45 percent in 2016, the city has been literally walking students to school each morning. The New York Times reports:

About 1,300 workers dressed in neon-green vests stand within eyeshot of one another on 142 designated routes. According to the city, no child has ever been a victim of a serious incident while Safe Passage workers have been on duty.

“We’re those kids’ parents from the time they’re leaving home to the time they’re getting to school, because those are our babies,” said Lakita Pearson, a Safe Passage supervisor on the West Side.

It’s very good that the program is working, but hard to hear that it’s even necessary. Read the whole article and watch the short documentary for a glimpse of how dangerous daily routines are in Chicago.

Meanwhile, over at Vox, John McWhorter examines a half-century of failed attempts to improve life in America’s inner cities. Reviewing Michael Woodsworth’s The Battle for Bed-Stuy: The Long War on Poverty in New York City, McWhorter writes:

Describing the Bed-Stuy of the ’50s and ’60s, Woodsworth sketches a neighborhood where as dismayed as residents were at the time — and as underperforming as institutions like schools were — single parenting was not yet a norm and murder rates were nothing like they have been since. There is a poignancy in the book, with its welter of acronyms (enough to require a key at the front of book) referring to programs that were ardently cherished at the time but by now forgotten — APOB, CAA, DNS, MFY, R&R, YIA, CHIP (which was something other than today’s health insurance program for children).

Today’s Workforce Investment Act used to be the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act of 1973, which in turn began as the Manpower Development Training Act. President Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper is a modern version of Bed-Stuy’s similarly intentioned Youth in Action program or Harlem Youth Opportunities Unlimited.

And despite the intense commitment of so very many undersung heroes, many of whom were women giving their lives to the anti-poverty effort while raising children and holding down jobs, none of these early programs made any real difference. Few could deny a simple fact about Bedford-Stuyvesant: There is all but no indication today that a Great Society effort ever occurred.

Read the whole thing to see why McWhorter thinks the Great Society programs and their descendants have been so unsuccessful.  One important takeaway is that blue governance is failing black America. In places with Democrat-controlled blue model-style governments, low-income African Americans are still struggling mightily. There have been some successes, but not many.

And it’s about to get worse: As city and state budgets are squeezed by unfunded pension obligations, black Americans will suffer as much if not more than anyone. Disproportionately, they hold civil service jobs and rely on programs which are often the first to be cut when money is tight. We hope more policymakers will engage in serious conversations with people like McWhorter about smarter approaches (public and private) to fighting poverty and violence in these communities.

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  • ltlee1

    Is Western Liberalism running out of space?

  • JR1123581321

    Oh my god. The solution is obvious to anyone with half a brain. Just raise tax rates to confiscatory levels above a certain limit randomly determined by Comrade FriendlyGoat. That will solve all the current problems, AND prevent any future problems from occurring.
    I’m Comrade FG’s official spokesman, and he approves this message. That is all.

  • Anthony

    Blue America (whatever that means) is not failing “black America” (designations/identities)! America the idea, and perhaps other Americans, (black, pink, red, yellow, opaque, etc.) have yet to work through (failure in some eyes) our unique experiment – among/between each other and country.

    McWhorter and others engage issue from both where they sit and begin – cf. Myrdal, American Dilemma 1944 (and much, much more before that).

  • Lyle7

    I am confident in us getting to the crux of the problem, which is a problem of the bad choices consistently made by individuals living in a degenerate subculture. Victim identity politics is going to be stood up to more vigorously during Trump’s time in office. People are already speaking more honestly about this, see Denzel Washington’s recent comments about what the truth of America actually is and the African-American director’s public chastising of the #OscarssoWhite folks. Trump has even befriended and already the charmed the likes of Jim Brown. Trump is providing a sliver of hope that we can speak honestly to one another in public, and it should be made easier by the hard facts of our American reality. Now, if only our intelligentsia will seek the truth as well.

  • Frank Natoli

    Blue America is failing black Americans?
    Black Americans vote 95/5 blue.
    Black Americans are failing black Americans.

    • Anthony

      Both simplistic and parochial (let alone regurgitating partisan political talking point shorn of American historical context).

      • Lyle7

        Hey, these partisans must be doing something right by pointing out the truth. More power to the regurgitating partisan political talking points!

        • Anthony

          No truth and reduction of a problem to a false simplicity as well as limiting range/scope of real issue (a real truth/not faux truth) comforts the partisan but perpetuates self-serving bias.

          • Lyle7

            Your words are meaningless. You’re just ignorant.

          • Anthony

            10 hours later and an aggrieved partisan reveals the cloistered intent (and for the public record, prior to your initial reply you were a cipher).

          • FluffyFooFoo

            You’re still struggling to make a cogent argument I see.

          • Anthony

            Fluffy, you’re back from Trump world and pilfering thoughts. This is not a site for morons!

      • Fat_Man

        No Frank is correct. There is a paradox there. I understand that voting paterns are largely a reflection of cultural factors, not any rational calculus or policy wonkery. Nonetheless, it is weird that African Americans could so unanimously support a bunch of politicians who have failed them so grievously.

        • Anthony

          Frank is not correct and there is no paradox. You’re capable enough not to conflate (by ignoring complicating factors and limiting scope) an articulated model with a historical dynamic conditioned by the construct “race”. And Fat_Man, this ground has been covered before (between me and you also) at ViaMedia/TAI more than I care to remember so if I might prevail, let’s conclude Frank’s meager contribution. Happy New Year!

          • Fat_Man

            ” You’re capable enough not to conflate (by ignoring complicating factors
            and limiting scope) an articulated model with a historical dynamic
            conditioned by the construct “race”.”

            Are you a consultant by trade/

          • Anthony

            In one of my varied lives sir – and God Bless you throughout 2017.

          • Fat_Man

            And a happy and healthy67 New Year to you and yours.

            But, Tony: Your prose is impenetrable.

          • Anthony

            Thanks, and sometimes by design (not always though); remember Strauss’s reverence for cryptic messaging.

      • JR1123581321

        It is simplistic and parochial to state that at some point people are responsible for their own actions? Actions have consequences. When you constantly vote for politicians that have failed you in the past, you will get more failure. Call it what you want, but that is exactly what is happening in blue cities of Baltimore, Chicago, Milwaukee, LA, Philadelphia, Newark, Trenton and the list goes on and on and on. The Left has nothing to offer but black controlled city machines and as example of Kwame Brown illustrates, that is just a recipe for fraud, not improvement of lives of people. The Left is bankrupt of ideas. Historical context discussion is a deflection from the fact that Democrats who run Flint can’t even provide drinkable water to their residents.

        • Anthony

          There is a distinction/difference between talking points and viable opinion (neurotic obsession about validating viewpoint/way of thinking). Anything else relative to post is superfluous but probably attractive to herd pleasing.

          • JR1123581321

            Herd pleasing? Um, OK…. See, when you get to define “talking points” as “things I don’t agree with” it becomes very easy to get trapped in an echo chamber. Instead of dismissing it as herd pleasing, perhaps you would be better served in realizing that perhaps your point of view is not as prevalent and self-evident as you think it is. That maybe, JUST MAYBE, the opposite point of view is seen as self-evident. Anyway, enjoy playing the role of a Disapproving Oracle. I’m taking the fam out to brunch. Cheerio….

          • Anthony

            Give it a rest. It’s New Year’s Day (appreciated if not celebrated in many parts of the world).

          • JR1123581321

            I accept your defeat. Happy New Year!

          • Anthony

            There is and has never been any contest but whatever you need to conclude! Shalom.

          • JR1123581321

            I see you came back with a more nuanced put down. Good for you. You hide it better than others, but your utmost disdain for anyone whose views differ from the prevalent liberal orthodoxy can’t help but shine through. I’m sure that when the push comes to shove, you’d crush dissent as ruthlessly as Comrade Friendlygoat

          • Anthony

            No, quite honestly I did not read your initial reply beyond 1st sentence as I awaited your instantaneous response. Only after salutation did I read complete reply, thus full response. Shalom.

          • JR1123581321

            Fair enough. nobody has to read anything. We are all free agents here.

          • Anthony

            Walter Russell Mead: One For All.

          • Fred

            You’re wasting your time with Anthony, JR. He’s utterly incapable of making an argument or adducing evidence. He tries to hide that fact by making Grand Pronouncements in clotted, muddy prose (which he no doubt thinks sounds “profound” and “intellectual”). When anyone challenges his Pronouncements, since he is incapable of addressing the challenge logically, he flings ad hominem accusations of “bias” or pseudo-scientific accusations of “cognitive distortion” in an affected tone of Olympian condescension to try to hide that fact. It’s both funny and sad how transparent he actually is.

          • JR1123581321

            Yeah, writing in an intentionally muddy way is annoying to read. It’s one thing when James Joyce does it, but I don’t see many Joyce’s hiding among the komentariat here.
            I just felt that Frank made a fairly obvious statement and when he got attacked for it, I just had to get involved. 🙂
            I use the block function too sometimes, mostly on liberals who compare Trump to Hitler, but never because of their political views. As long as the writing is good, you can spout the most abhorrent stuff and I won’t block you. And unlike Comrade FriendlyGoat, I won’t report you either.
            Alas, people like us are an ever-shrinking minority.

        • Frank Natoli

          I wonder how much of, say, the 305 pages of Thomas Sowell’s “The Vision of the Anointed” I’d have to quote to escape the dismissal of “simplistic and parochial”?
          The destruction of the black family is intuitively understood to have been caused by slavery. Except, as Sowell notes, the literature is full of black men and black women, after the end of the Civil War, searching the entire South to find their spouses and family. It would appear the intuitively correct blame is mistaken.
          And, as Sowell notes, the first census that asked whether one is or had ever been married, that of 1890, showed black Americans with slightly higher numbers than white Americans. No family destruction…yet.
          It was the Washington adoption of the blue model by Franklin Delano Roosevelt, in the 1930s, that moved black Americans from a monolithic Republican vote to an equally monolithic Democrat vote and the not just destruction but disintegration of the black family proceeded forthwith.
          Black Americans have failed black Americans. Any number of gratuitous slurs can be slung against that conclusion. But it’s still true.

          • Anthony

            You don’t have to quote “none” of Sowell’s pages to contravene a simplistic and parochial determination. Sowell appeals to both your prejudices and confirmatory interests – not necessarily to your exploratory curiosity. Nothing personal Frank (an observation).

          • Frank Natoli

            So. If Occam’s Razor favors the simplest explanation consistent with the facts, Anthony’s Razor favors the most unnecessarily convoluted?

          • Anthony

            Yea, O.K. Frank (8 hrs. later).

          • Jim__L

            Anthony, among the weird things about your posts is your obsession with what time the responses are posted. Do you realize that people read these at arbitrary times?

            Anyway, here’s to hoping you pass the Turing Test in 2017! Keep at it!

          • Anthony
          • Jim__L

            Oops, nope, with that one we can tell you’re a bot.

            Keep trying, though!

          • Anthony

            prospect.org/article/audacity-hope

          • JR1123581321

            an article from Salon? Do I need to check my whiteness before reading it?

          • Anthony

            Depends on what is “whiteness” but let’s not go further; more importantly, use your agency to decide (as you can remember, once before I mentioned information comes in various sources).

          • Frank Natoli

            https://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/a/alberteins383803.html
            If you can’t explain it simply, you don’t understand it well enough.
            Albert Einstein

          • Anthony

            Yea, Frank (24 hrs. later – let it go!).

          • JR1123581321

            How is that at all relevant to his point? You keep on using intentionally obscure writing to make a point that people aren’t responsible for their actions. Nobody is buying it. But feel free to post more links to Salon. Those are really good at convincing other people that they are wrong. Good luck with that Turing Test….

          • Anthony

            I care neither for his point nor your injection!

          • JR1123581321

            I care about you caring for neither. Is it just me or is there a lot of caring going on around here? Must be that residual holiday spirit.

          • Anthony

            Care reveals itself in what we do as much as it may in what we write. Now to foreclose any further attempts to elicit comment beyond a sentence or two, I deliberately avoid your general internet commentary, nothing personal just a style preference (as I am quite familiar with your comment thread engagement here and elsewhere). That said, I recognize you have both motive and reason for what you do via internet comment threads. I on the other hand am motivated neither by on-going exchanges nor personal contests of who believes what and its requisite virtue. Ideas, not the messenger (vehicle) impels my internet interests. Shalom.

          • JR1123581321

            I agree completely. Ideas, what we believe in, the cornerstones of our intellectual being, is what interests me as well. But since faith without deeds is dead, I act my beliefs both here and in real life. If you won’t fight for what you believe in, how can you ask anyone else to do it?

          • Anthony

            Keep acting. I don’t know how long you’ve been in America but my family (and I) has generations of not only deeds but also fighting (both my great maternal and fraternal grandfathers help liberate that flag avatar you utilize – 1919) for ascribe cornerstones you reference. Good luck!

          • JR1123581321

            Valor of your ancestors gives great honor to them, not you. The avatar I use was all the rage when murderous Islamic thugs killed people in Paris in 2015. Everyone had it for a time. But then it slowly disappeared. I kept mine just so ignoramuses will not know where it came from.
            I’m not acting. I find it sad that you are unable to process disagreement. You have a lot invested in your online Oracle of Truth persona. You can’t expect others to treat it as seriously as you do.

          • Anthony

            You misunderstand (but that’s not surprising when one intensely focus on a person). I nor my family need recognition nor honor from outside, though thanks (and my honor has not only been inherited but merited). We long-term American have nothing to prove especially on anonymous internet comment threads. This “ends” it for me here!

          • JR1123581321

            We long-term Americans? What is that supposed to mean? Don’t tell me a good progressive like you is now questioning the validity of people’s opinions based on how long they have been in America? Or do you even care, as long as you get to tell people to shut up.
            I wasn’t trying to prove anything. I just made fun of your Oracle of Truth persona. Come on, you cultivate it on purpose. We are all smart people here. That’s your thing. You are serious about it. I am not. I’m sorry.

          • ljgude

            I’d add that the Republican party of Coolidge bore little resemblance to the Republican party of Abraham Lincoln and FDR looked like and was a positive change in many ways. I don’t think ending segregation in the South or promoting civil rights for Blacks destroyed the Black Family. But the kind of programs cited in the article sure did. I worked in those kind of programs in Chicago in the 60s and believed they would work. But they didn’t and they had terrible unintended consequences. I also think that when Black people recognize for themselves when they have failed, they create the opportunity to change their situation. Trump has said he will try to do something different for Blacks and is appointing Ben Carson to HUD. It is still just trying to solve the problem by changing the government inputs so I am skeptical. But if he succeeds even a little a lot of Black Folks are going to be voting Republican again.

          • Frank Natoli

            I don’t think ending segregation in the South or promoting civil rights for Blacks destroyed the Black Family.
            Neither did Sowell in “The Vision of the Anointed”. In fact, as I noted, Sowell considered the exploding welfare state to be not coincidental, not correlative but causal of the break-up of the black family. I agree.
            I also think that when Black people recognize for themselves when they have failed, they create the opportunity to change their situation.
            For example? Take the crack cocaine of the 1990s. Inner city blacks were devastated by crack cocaine. Their black representatives in Congress demanded action to eliminate crack cocaine. The New York Times ran articles with photos showing a young black woman, a “strawberry”, with a child on her back, servicing a john to get money for her fix.
            http://www.city-journal.org/html/criminal-justice-system-racist-13078.html
            The dealers were removed from the streets. The crack epidemic ceased. That was immediately followed by the same black representatives who demanded action demanding the dealers be released.
            This is an “opportunity to change their situation”?

      • texasjimbo

        The obtuseness of your comments is *not* an indication of brilliance, given the consistent absence of factual or deductive argumentation in their content. It is an indication of the worst sort of idiocy: the idiot who either believes they are brilliant or hopes to trick others into believing it. Blithely asserting that those you *feel* are wrong (or you would like to believe are wrong) are “transparently” wrong is not an argument. As far as I can tell, that is entirely what 99% of your comments consist of, and that makes you the one who is transparently wrong.

        • Anthony

          Real simple my man: you are not the audience (stay in Trump world and locate the correct “website”.)

          • texasjimbo

            Real simple, dude: you’re the primary audience for your comments.

          • Anthony

            Wrong link: Breitbart.

          • texasjimbo

            Wrong link; you should be at the daily kos, the place for vapid, stupid comments. On second thought, they might be too smart for you.

          • Anthony

            You reactionaries may be too over invested (reflexive emotionalism). Give it a rest ideologue (keep the drivel to yourself – as for some purpose you’ve continue this charade now 48 hrs.).

          • texasjimbo

            “You reactionaries may be too over invested (reflexive emotionalism” Given the absolute absence of any real substance in your keyboard diarrhea, that comment can’t be anything other than projection. And 90%+ of reactionaries are on the left. Remember what Lincoln said: “It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and remove all doubt. But for God’s sake, if you insist on commenting so much, at least try to actually say something. But maybe you are trying and just can’t do any better.

          • Anthony

            You’ve done it; your behavior resembles a blocked obsessed troll (coincidentally also a Texas resident) whose fate you may soon share if I can conclude definitely you are he masquerading as texasjimbo. Nevertheless, it’s over final round ends here!

          • texasjimbo

            Imagine my disappointment that the whinny, dim witted leftist gets his feelings hurt if anyone persist in responding to his banalities (IOW, refuses to let him have the last word) and threatens to “block” me. Poor, poor, poor baby. To bad you can’t actually come up with something worthwhile to say.

          • Anthony

            This exception is made (for clarity). I am not concerned about your disappointment or what you think; inanity comes with universal access (a shortcoming of virtual networking). I live with it but will not encourage it (to that end, prior to your initial contact, you were a cipher). If you need the last word be my quest but make it the “last” and be gone with God’s Blessings.

          • texasjimbo

            If you don’t care what I think, why are you making threats and why do you continue to respond? I only make this exception because you keep making exceptions. You’ve been banal the entire time you’ve been commenting, because that is apparently all you can be.

    • LarryD

      LBJ designed the Great Society to buy black votes. It has been successful at this. The question is, did he understand that the cultivated dependency would undermine the black family, with the very serious social repercussions.

      Congress did the same thing to the American Indians in the 19th century, but no pretense was made that this was for the Indians benefit, Congress was just tired of the Indian wars and wanted an end to them.

      • Frank Natoli

        Language is everything. Who does not want to “help” someone in need? First problem is, how does one define “help”? Obviously some Democrats define “help” in terms of buying votes, which has been eminently successful since FDR. But I suspect that most Democrats define “help” as transfer of income from those who earn to those who don’t, not caring that a multi-generational cycle of dependency is inevitable, not caring that more than a little element of transfer of income is more envy of the “haves” than sympathy for the “have nots”.
        When black Americans decide that the Party of Entitlement Slavery is the worst thing that ever happened to black America, because these blacks CHOOSE to be enslaved, black Americans will have finally won the war.

  • ——————————

    Slavery, blue this and that, blah, blah, blah.
    Blacks have been failing each other for thousands of years in every place they live, especially when they are in control. There is nothing but blatant evidence of that all over the world, now and through out history…that’s it, end of subject.

    Okay, now let’s move on and talk about something more important….

    • Anthony

      Just for nothing: knowledge is a precious commodity, and how to distinguish vetted fact from superstition, rumor, and unexamined conventional wisdom avails insight. Moreover, it (knowledge) can help the human mind in avoiding fallacies and biases to which the untutored mind is vulnerable. Moving on with a purpose has its place.

      • ——————————

        Yes, true.

        But the subject in this article and in my comment just goes on and on without change, so let’s focus on the problems that can be changed….

    • JR1123581321

      Every race has a subculture that is trapped in a cycle of poverty and violence. You can find evidence of this phenomenon in Appalachia, every single inner city in every single major Western country, the entire Middle East (except for Israel). I find the very idea of war on poverty to be a fool’s errand since no less of an authority on the subject matter than Jesus Christ himself has pointed out “The poor will always be with us”.

      • ——————————

        Yes you can find “evidence of this”, as you say.
        But my point is that with blacks it is overwhelming…and for some reason we seem to just make excuses for it, give reasons why it is not their fault, or if we just do something it will change.
        There are no excuses, it is their fault, and it will never change, period.

  • Disappeared4x

    Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood is a problematic example for TAI’s take-away of the failure of “Democrat-controlled blue model-style governments”, or for McWhorter to use in his interesting assessment. Bed-Stuy has a very distinctive history, ignored by McWhorter. Surely there is a neighborhood in The Bronx, the poorest urban county in the USA, that might reveal more insight. Has there been a study of the impact on neighborhood poverty by the re-development of Bronx Terminal Market from a thriving wholesale ethnic food market to a mall with Home Depot and Target?

    At least McWhorter zeroes in on the factor of illegal drugs.

    TAI might want to follow how many times Mayor de Blasio pronounces a condescending top-down solution that mostly stimulates a new candidate to oppose him in the 2017 Democratic primary, which surely will redefine “Democrat-controlled blue model-style governments”.

    Dec 18 2016 “…Queens State Senator Tony Avella gathered a dozens-strong crowd outside the Holiday Inn Express in Maspeth, Queens; the site of a bitter battle over the city’s effort to lodge homeless families—to launch a quixotic bid to beat Mayor Bill de Blasio in next fall’s Democratic primary, accusing the liberal leader of an arrogant “top-down” approach that ignores the needs of local communities. …”

    http://observer.com/2016/12/angry-white-guy-from-queens-now-running-to-oust-nyc-mayor-bill-de-blasio/

  • Boritz

    “Democrat-controlled blue model-style governments”

    This phrase, even in vacuum, has the power to explain why the Great Society was no failure but a great success.

  • FriendlyGoat

    As a start, I’d be for the LARCs and for as many voluntary vasectomies as you can talk young men into having. Whether it is our urban areas or those of other difficult parts of the world, there is nothing to be gained from lots of extra babies born into places where both the upbringing and the adult opportunities are dismal. Going from 1 billion (1850) to 9 billion (2050) is an accelerated stress on society that we are living through without much real understanding of the ramifications. Last I heard, 2100 is scheduled for 12 billion.

    • Disappeared4x

      You most likely know about Deep Ecology, a driver of the 2016 Democratic Party platform, including birth control and abortion.
      http://www.deepecology.org/platform.htm

      Joel Kotkin notices (apologies for failure to find his 2016 update): “Environmental activists turn up the rhetorical heat” Oct. 18, 2015
      http://www.ocregister.com/articles/people-687876-environmental-change.html

      • FriendlyGoat

        No, I was not all that familiar with Deep Ecology, and perhaps should not have rambled into world population. But I did so because urban problems (such as ours with American cities like Chicago or parts of NYC) seem directly related to having too many people stacked into small spaces and are similar to problems in 20+ world cities with populations even greater than that of NYC. I am reluctant to get too far into the racial aspect of issues with certain black neighborhoods but would offer this:

        1) Wherever it is necessary to get volunteers to walk kids to school so the kids will (maybe) not be shot is a good place to consider adding fewer kids to the neighborhood. So long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) for women there seems like a sensible relief action.

        2) I once had a friend who worked in a prison. The stories he told me of fellows there who spoke of having multiple children by multiple baby mamas to whom they were never married were eye-opening for me. I came to believe that a certain number of young men might well serve themselves and everyone else with a voluntary vasectomy early in life. Even as a married guy, I had one of those early in life and never regretted it. Had I been getting a bunch of women pregnant without means or intent to support the children, I would have REALLY done everyone a big favor by avoiding that ahead of time. Whether from Deep Ecology or other initiatives, I think the idea of more vasectomies for more men will be increasingly discussed this century.

        • Disappeared4x

          Am unsure if population density correlates with violent crime, poverty. Cultures, policing policies, economic drivers – so many variables. Singapore. Hong Kong. NYC vs Chicago. Bed-Stuy is low-density, lots of row houses.
          My theory is too much sleep disruption from noise makes too many people edgy and angry.

          I am sure your friend knew his prison’s fellows spoke: in a proud tone. Cultures do vary.

          • FriendlyGoat

            You’re probably right about the noise and bustle. I am now out in the country and would not go back to a metro.
            As for the men in the prison, yes, they were proud of their fathering. But so many of their kids were having hard lives.

        • Disappeared4x

          Here is how Deep Ecology drives activists, and shapes the connection between over-population and environmental issues – seems too many people in Utah, Nevada, Idaho, and Florida are having babies that threaten wildlife:
          “…The Center for Biological Diversity said the condom giveaway was meant to highlight overpopulation amid fears of Trump policies on contraception along with fears of what could happen to protected wildlife
          species under his administration.

          “We must stand and oppose every Trump policy that hurts wildlife; poisons our air and water; destroys our climate; promotes racism, misogyny or homophobia; and marginalizes entire segments of our society,” the center said in the announcement of the tour, saying they want to gather pledge signatures for the resistance while creating “a huge, viral social media #Earth2Trump messaging campaign.”

          https://pjmedia.com/news-and-politics/2017/01/02/environmentalists-hand-out-condoms-to-protest-feared-trump-era-overpopulation/
          [just wanted to share an example. It is how the 2016 Dems try to pull all of their planks together]

          • FriendlyGoat

            Republicans always have a diverse agenda. Why shouldn’t Democrats?

    • Anthony

      “If everything and everyone is portrayed negatively, there’s a leveling effect that opens the door to charlatans.” Something to look at when you get opportunity – extensive so make time: https://shorensteincenter.org/news-coverage-2016-general-election/

      • FriendlyGoat

        Thanks. Having not yet waded through that lengthy piece, I agree with the premise. The for-profit press covers things the way they think the consumers want to hear them—–and that appears to be “more critical and negative than the brand X competition”. We can see the stupidity this has helped to produce.

        • Anthony

          Yes, not only do we see it (unfortunately) but experience it generally via on-line interfacing (comment threads may be a life line for….). Negativity or incessant criticism has both a corrosive and inviting effect (like attracts like). Still as I have written to you a few days ago, acquiescence and and acceptance of such (stupidity/negativity) via a spiral of silence have to be both guarded against and countered with a resonant alternative. After reading piece, perhaps we’ll exchange further.

    • JR1123581321

      What are you still doing here? You promised that you were going to leave? You always do that. You always tell us that you are going to give us the gift of your absence, and then you never follow through. How sad.
      Anyway, I already told people that we should have confiscatory tax rates above a certain point randomly determined by you. What else do we need to say? I’m curious.

    • Anthony

      washingtonmonthly.com/2016/12/23/christian-amer9ca-is-in-decline-heres-why-itimpacts-everyone/

    • Anthony

      Something of interests to further navigate:

      “…even as the conservatism of the Republican base has increased dramatically, something extra has given that base a greater intensity and greater focus on government as the biggest threat to American society. The catalyst is the strength of the organizations that give American conservatism shape, passion, and direction: media outlets, advocacy groups, think tanks, and other mobilizing institutions….As the center and left have lost ground, the right has built precisely the kinds of organizations needed to turn general support into focused mobilization.

      The machinery has three key elements: Christian conservatism, polarizing right-wing media, and growing efforts by business and the wealthy to backstop and bankroll Republican politics….” (American Amnesia)

      Just a heads up.

  • josiejosie

    Let’s go one step further on this issue, and accept as a given that African-Americans have been doing themselves a disservice by voting for Democratic-Party responses to Black poverty. Why have they not seen the value of the Republican agenda?

    There really IS a glaring, simple answer: for the past 52 years, the GOP has utterly failed to make its case to this community. From the LBJ years, when Blacks and Dixiecrats switched parties, to the present, there has never been a constructive plan directed at the improvement of African-American lives; to the contrary, Republicans have directed ire and scorn at Blacks, not policy.

    I remember that in the mid-sixties–I was a White child in New York City, interested enough in politics and the civil rights movement to start paying attention to both sides–in private and in public, Republicans railed about welfare queens, Cadillac driving welfare-cheating pimps, lazy people unwilling to work, arrogantly expecting the rest of us to support them, immature, dangerous, self-destructive. It was a long, scary and very detailed list. The GOP plan: “They don’t deserve help. Cut them off.”

    That language, or at least the message, has barely changed since then. But in this last election cycle, candidate Trump issued a new rallying cry, taken up across the Republican party: It is racist to vote for Democrats because Trump and the GOP have the (unspecified) solution to the problem of Black poverty and urban blight, with images lifted directly from the 1960s, and Blacks really don’t know how to vote for themselves. This was in the middle of campaign noteworthy for its appeal to the white supremacist movement, which interpreted Mr. Trump’s message as empowering to its cause.

    No less significant were moves to keep African-Americans out of the voting booth, tactics which were publicly acknowledged and discussed by GOP leaders: reducing the powers of the Voting Rights Act; creating a financial barrier to low-income voters with fabricated charges of voter fraud; and gerrymandering.

    We can bicker back and forth about whether the Republican Party sees any benefit, strategic or otherwise, to more than a token African-American presence in its ranks, but there’s really no need.

    It’s simple deductive reasoning: even if every single Black person in America were to believe that the Democrats are wrong, you could not expect that they (in any number) would see a rational alternative in the GOP.

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