Shakeup in North Korea
Is China the Biggest Loser?
show comments
  • Thirdsyphon

    Is it possible that Kim was emboldened to take this action by China’s humiliating blunder over the ADIZ?

    I know it’s received opinion in some circles that Obama is feckless and weak and unskilled at diplomacy whereas his geopolitical adversaries are invariably possessed of unfathomable reserves of determination and cunning. . .but it seems that if anyone had a clever plan for how best to exploit this situation, it was the United States. Certainly, the U.S. stands to reap all of the benefits from how things are shaking out.

    Rebalancing accomplished.

  • Thirdsyphon

    Is it possible that Kim was emboldened to take this action by China’s humiliating blunder over the ADIZ?

    I know it’s received opinion in some circles that Obama is feckless and weak and unskilled at diplomacy whereas his geopolitical adversaries are invariably possessed of unfathomable reserves of determination and cunning. . .but it seems that if anyone had a clever plan for how best to exploit this situation, it was the United States. Certainly, the U.S. stands to reap all of the benefits from how things are shaking out.

    Rebalancing accomplished.

  • crocodilechuck

    “Each time North Korea turns aggressive, confrontational, and unpredictable, the US gets another reason to keep vigilant and well-armed military forces in East Asia, and US allies are happy to leave it that way. That’s the last thing China wants.”

    Walt, you have it exactly backwards. What China REALLY doesn’t want-THE last thing- is Korean re unification, with 30,000 US troops and signal intelligence gathering on its doorstep.

    “Jang was a useful and friendly interlocutor between Beijing and Pyongyang” Source/Link for this?

    ps “The true reasons for ousting Jang remain unclear” Really? I think the reasons are sufficiently obvious that to even articulate them would be trivial: Kim Jong Un is his own man.

  • crocodilechuck

    “Each time North Korea turns aggressive, confrontational, and unpredictable, the US gets another reason to keep vigilant and well-armed military forces in East Asia, and US allies are happy to leave it that way. That’s the last thing China wants.”

    Walt, you have it exactly backwards. What China REALLY doesn’t want-THE last thing- is Korean re unification, with 30,000 US troops and signal intelligence gathering on its doorstep.

    “Jang was a useful and friendly interlocutor between Beijing and Pyongyang” Source/Link for this?

    ps “The true reasons for ousting Jang remain unclear” Really? I think the reasons are sufficiently obvious that to even articulate them would be trivial: Kim Jong Un is his own man.

  • DaddyPhatsax

    “It will now be even harder for China to rein in its ally.”

    Correction: as of this execution, North Korea is no longer an ally of China. Or rather, China is no longer an ally of North Korea.

    China doesn’t need this drama. From now on, China will prefer to collaborate with the Republic of Korea on reducing the harm caused by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

    Is China the biggest loser? Yeah, sure. It just lost a legacy headache it could do without. Must feel like a big relief.

© The American Interest LLC 2005-2017 About Us Masthead Submissions Advertise Customer Service
We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.