Known Unknowns
Millennials, the ACA, and the Vortex of Ignorance
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  • Anthony

    “The truth is we really don’t know what the demographic make up of the new ACA enrollments will be until we get the actual results next month…the biggest test will be how they react to the way the ACA is distorting prices and provider networks.” The above highlights two signal points going forward; health care as sold, provided, and used in America remains daunting sector. If ACA has done anything positive, it is bringing to public discussion the complexity of health care delivery.

  • Anthony

    “The truth is we really don’t know what the demographic make up of the new ACA enrollments will be until we get the actual results next month…the biggest test will be how they react to the way the ACA is distorting prices and provider networks.” The above highlights two signal points going forward; health care as sold, provided, and used in America remains daunting sector. If ACA has done anything positive, it is bringing to public discussion the complexity of health care delivery. See: www,washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/12/07/obamacares-real-promise-if-you-lose-your-health-care-plan-you-can-get-new-/ (or at site WONK BLOG: Obamacare’s real promise…)

  • Jacksonian_Libertarian

    A few glaring questions:
    Of the 18 to 29 year old’s, those 18 to 25 can remain on their parents insurance leaving only the 26 to 29 year old’s or 36% of the 18 to 29 needing insurance.
    Of those remaining why should they pay hundreds every month when the fee is only $95 collected from any tax refund you might get, and that only if the incompetent bureaucracy can find out you don’t have insurance?
    Why pay thousands every year for insurance, with a several thousand dollar deductible, when you are healthy and haven’t been to the doctor for years?
    Since you can’t be turned down for preexisting conditions, why not wait to purchase insurance until you suffer a financially catastrophic medical problem, which may not happen until you are already on medicare?
    You could potentially save hundreds of thousands in insurance payments for insurance that you never used because the deductible is so high you end up paying cash anyway for all normal medical treatments.

    • Andrew Allison

      It isn’t just the 18-29 year-olds. I just priced a Bronze policy (40% co-pay, $4K deductible) for my 57 year-old wife with an annual premium several times this year’s actual cost of medical care. This is insane.

  • Jacksonian_Libertarian

    A few glaring questions:

    Of the 18 to 29 year old’s, those 18 to 25 remain on their parents insurance leaving only the 26 to 29 year old’s or 36% of the 18 to 29 needing insurance.

    Of those remaining why should they pay hundreds every month when the fee is only $95 collected from any tax refund you might get, and that only if the incompetent bureaucracy can find out you don’t have insurance?

    Why pay thousands every year for insurance, with a several thousand dollar deductible, when you are healthy and haven’t been to the doctor for years?

    Since you can’t be turned down for preexisting conditions, why not wait to purchase insurance until you suffer a financially catastrophic medical problem, which may not happen until you are already on medicare?

    You could potentially save hundreds of thousands of dollars (40 years of steadily rising payments) in insurance payments for insurance that you never used because the deductible is so high you end up paying cash anyway for all normal medical treatments.

    • Andrew Allison

      It isn’t just the 18-29 year-olds. I just priced a Bronze policy (40% co-pay, $4K deductible) for my 57 year-old wife with an annual premium several times this year’s actual cost of medical care. This is insane.

  • TommyTwo

    “Of course, even if the Obama administration convinces or coerces a
    sufficient number of millennials to sign up for coverage, the bigger
    test will how they react to the way the ACA is distorting prices and provider networks. It doesn’t count for much to get Gen Y to sign up if they dislike you ever after for it.”

    In the “Nobody ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the American public” category, will this be true? Most of those young’uns have never bought insurance for themselves and will thus have no basis for comparison. I predict many will fall for: “Kindly Obama made the evil insurance companies give you health care, but being evil, they are willfully sabotaging him with all of these unnecessary vexations. Time for single payer!”

  • TommyTwo

    “Of course, even if the Obama administration convinces or coerces a
    sufficient number of millennials to sign up for coverage, the bigger
    test will how they react to the way the ACA is distorting prices and provider networks. It doesn’t count for much to get Gen Y to sign up if they dislike you ever after for it.”

    In the “Nobody ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the American public” category, will this be true? Most of those young’uns have never bought insurance for themselves and will thus have no basis for comparison. I predict many will fall for: “Kindly Obama made the evil insurance companies give you health care, but being evil, they are willfully sabotaging him with all of these unnecessary vexations. Time for single payer!”

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