Week in Review
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  • USNK2

    Via Meadia missed one of the most interesting news stories of the week, September 1-7, 2013:
    Congratulations to the city of Tokyo, and the nation of Japan for giving the world something important to look forward to:
    the Tokyo Summer Olympics of 2020.
    Thanks also to the IOC for a good final vote process.

    • Corlyss

      A sports story about something that’s going to happen 7 years from now was interesting?

      • USNK2

        Would anyone be looking forward to Istanbul2020?
        Glass half full…

        • Corlyss

          I take your point.

          Personally, if I were the sort that actually attended the Olympics, I’d rather go to Istanbul. What I’d most likely be doing is looking for those cafes where singers engage in days-long recitations of ancient sagas, like the Trojan war and Gilgamesh. I understand there are such places in Turkey.

          • USNK2

            Corlyss: last time in this comment thread, but, interesting that you enjoy the saga of Gilgamesh.
            Why would Turks celebrate the epic of Mesopotamia?

            I am more into Hindu India’s foundational epics: Mahabharata and Ramayana.
            Maybe see you in another comment thread, but am increasingly disappointed at the work of young interns here at VM.

  • dankingbooks

    I totally disagree with Dr. Mead’s advice to pursue a liberal arts education. Today it is mostly a consumer good, and not something of economic value. Technology now enables students to read the Great Books on their own, later in life. Thus the liberal arts needs to move into the continuing ed column.

    I’ve posted about this here: http://trotskyschildren.blogspot.com/2013/08/whats-wrong-with-college.html

    There is more at the end of this post, here: http://trotskyschildren.blogspot.com/p/predictions-for-future-stem-employment.html

    • Corlyss

      I have to disagree with you and agree with the Prof. A liberal arts education gives the owner maximum flexibility in the non-science, non-tech world, which is actually most of the world. What’s missing from all of ’em is critical reasoning.

      BTW are you a bookstore owner?

      • dankingbooks

        No, I am not a bookstore owner–how’d you get that idea? I do blog over at Trotsky’s Children. I have written a couple of books, which you can find by searching “dan king” at Amazon. But they’re not for polite company.

        I think the liberal arts have great value, but not economic value. I also don’t think they’re best suited for 18-year olds. The ideal LA student is 30, in a career, and pursuing it for its own sake.

        You can learn critical thinking studying anything rigorously. It doesn’t have to be the liberal arts.

        • Corlyss

          *******books sounds like a lot bookstores that I’ve done bidness with. That’s all. Never occurred to me that you might be a writer. Sorry. No insult intended.

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