The Road to Green Growth Is Paved with Good Inventions
show comments
  • Andrew Allison

    Several years ago I read of an interesting experiment (sorry, don’t have a reference): a researcher in Seattle assembled the addresses of employees with interchangeable jobs (fast-food, bank tellers, checkout clerks), optimized their commutes by moving them to closer locations and reduced overall commute mileage 40%.

    • f1b0nacc1

      Sounds like something the central-planners would love. Something tells me that the jobs aren’t all that interchangeable….

      • Andrew Allison

        Nothing to do with central-planning. Think Starbucks, McDonald’s, et al; big banks and grocery chains; etc. What’s the employee, and hence employer, benefit of a significantly reduced commute? What’s the reduction in commuting worth to the environment (society)? Enough to justify licensing software that does the job for their employees with a tax credit for the environmental benefits?

        We’ve got more than enough to worry about with NSA and friends without inventing imaginary impediments.

        • f1b0nacc1

          Given the mobility of Americans (particularly those in some of these lower-level ‘interchangeable’ jobs), I can easily imagine someone working in one part of an urban (or suburban area) who moves to another one 20 minutes away. This person remains in their previous place of employment, but has a commute that is 20 minutes longer. They may like their old place of employment (friends, work enviornment, etc.), but are ‘inefficiently’ allocated…

© The American Interest LLC 2005-2017 About Us Masthead Submissions Advertise Customer Service
We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.