Blue Disaster: To Live (and Die) in Connecticut
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  • JDogg Snook

    Connecticut. It’s the way to get from New York to Massachusetts.

    • Kavanna

      Sad case. It’s New England’s “other Rhode Island.”

  • Guest

    I was born and raised in Connecticut, just after WWII, in a small town (current population about 13,000) west of New Haven. My father worked in metals, and thus our family understood all too well the secular loss of manufacturing jobs in what used to be one of the great manufacturing states of America. That was *not* the fault of politicians.

    Iitiation of the Great Decline, however, is directly traceable to one Democrat politician, Mayor Richard C. Lee of New Haven, who (in 1958) in order to secure his re-election began to advertise all over the Deep South, recruiting busloads of people to come to New Haven with the promise that not only would their fare be reimbursed immediately, but guaranteeing that within 48 hours they would be on welfare as long as they wished, with no questions asked.

    It worked, and was soon copied by mayors in Bridgeport, Hartford, New Britain and so on. The classic Connecticut Yankee was quickly overwhelmed at the polls by a dependency class having no roots to the state.

    What you describe is the *result* of that cynical effort to secure faithful Democrat allegiance. One fruit of that effort is that my 95-year-old mother must cough up over $500 per month (property taxes) as rent on the modest 1842 house our family has owned “free and clear” for nearly fifty years. In a town of just 13,000 people.

    The place is truly insane. New Haven’s population has declined by a third and it’s rarely safe (even for Yalies) to walk around at night. The park where I regularly played in the woods as a kid (across from my grandparents’ home) is now so full of perverts, druggies, drunks and gangs that on my recent visit to the area I was too concerned for my safety to visit the old haunts. This, from a guy who many times was working 50 or more miles behind guerrilla lines in several of South America’s real trouble spots in the early ’90s.

    Terribly sad. As usual, Democrats made a tough situation vastly worse.

  • Bart Hall

    I was born and raised in Connecticut, just after WWII, in a small town (current population about 13,000) west of New Haven. My father worked in metals, and thus our family understood all too well the secular loss of manufacturing jobs in what used to be one of the great manufacturing states of America. That was *not* the fault of politicians.

    Initiation of the Great Decline, however, is directly traceable to one Democrat politician, Mayor Richard C. Lee of New Haven, who (in 1958) in order to secure his re-election began to advertise all over the Deep South, recruiting busloads of people to come to New Haven with the promise that not only would their fare be reimbursed immediately, but guaranteeing that within 48 hours they would be on welfare as long as they wished, with no questions asked.

    It worked, and was soon copied by mayors in Bridgeport, Hartford, New Britain and so on. The classic Connecticut Yankee was quickly overwhelmed at the polls by a dependency class having no roots to the state.

    What you describe is the *result* of that cynical effort to secure faithful Democrat allegiance. One fruit of that effort is that my 95-year-old mother must cough up over $500 per month (property taxes) as rent on the modest 1842 house our family has owned “free and clear” for nearly fifty years. In a town of just 13,000 people.

    The place is truly insane. New Haven’s population has declined by a third and it’s rarely safe (even for Yalies) to walk around at night. The park where I regularly played in the woods as a kid (across from my grandparents’ home) is now so full of perverts, druggies, drunks and gangs that on my recent visit to the area I was too concerned for my safety to visit the old haunts. This, from a guy who many times was working 50 or more miles behind guerrilla lines in several of South America’s real trouble spots in the early ’90s.

    Terribly sad. As usual, Democrats made a tough situation vastly worse.

  • USNK2

    Interesting how Connecticut’s “…probate system that allows “judges to collect fees for essentially looting estates” …”
    Thought that was New York’s way of staying solvent…

  • bpuharic

    I wonder what “Blue Model Decline” means. Does it mean greatest number of people with no health insurance? Seems death is indicative of a problem

    And the red states have higher infant mortality rates than blue states do. http://kff.org/other/state-indicator/infant-death-rate/

    How about states with highest percentage of minimum wage jobs, like TX?

    Unemployment isn’t much difference in MA vs TX. And tax rates are higher in MA than in TX so it’s apparent the tax fetish he has doesn’t explain much. Of course, folks in MA have healthcare while many in TX don’t, but I guess that since life is cheaper in TX you can bury your workers and not really worry about the expense of replacing them

    In the red model

    • Jeff77450

      “Blue Model Decline” means that the utopian goal of “let each one contribute according to his ability and receive according to his needs” has been proven to not work. Productive people quite naturally want to be compensated in proportion to the value of their contributions and they don’t want government pointing a gun at their heads, figuratively speaking, and *forcing* them to share with the less productive. (As Bill Gates, Warren Buffet et al illustrate, they don’t mind sharing voluntarily).

      It further proves that when you try to create a utopian cradle-to-grave nanny-state with borrowed money…the end result is collapse.

      I read an article by someone from India who expressed that he thought socialism was the greatest idea since sliced-bread but he conceded that it only (minimally) worked in countries with small, homogenous populations like the Scandinavian nations. He said that socialism isn’t “scalable;” his word.

      He pointed out that Japan’s and the U.S.’ versions of socialism were nowhere near as elaborate & generous as the Scandinavian countries and yet Japan’s national debt as a percentage of GDP is around 200% and the U.S.’ is at or approaching 100%.

      The utopian nanny-state that provides you with almost everything from cradle-to-grave just isn’t affordable and thus it isn’t *doable*.

      • bpuharic

        And how’s that red model…minimum wage jobs, no health insurance, no retirement pension, 30 years of wage stagnation while the wealthy gamble with their money…they win…they keep it. They lose? You pick up the tab

        We saw the red model at work in 2007. It cost us 19 trillion dollar and 8 million unemployed

        But the rich did fine, increasing their income by 11% in 2011. To the right wing, that’s ALL that’s important.

        Right wingers are SOCIALISTS for the rich.

    • Doug

      Blue state decline means that some very large fraction of my kids’ high school friends have graduated college to no future and are living in their parents’ basements. I’m encouraging my son to look for a job in Texas because there is no future in Connecticut.

      • bpuharic

        So you want your son to have a nice, minimum wage job for the next 30 years in TX? No health insurance for the grandkids?

        Good. You and your kids take the low paying jobs. The rest of us will work for a better future for people who want to work hard to achieve something.

        See you at the drive through!

  • Doug

    The sad truth is that the Connecticut legislature and governor today are owned lock, stock and barrel by the public sector unions. The public sector unions control the state even more than in California. The public sector unions could care less about industry or commerce or any form of private enterprise except as sheep to shorn. That attitude, and the deeply held Democratic belief that money grows on trees, has brought Connecticut to this sad state.

    Republicans, even though they currently have no power or influence at the state level, don’t get a pass, either. All too many Republican politicians over the years have been solely concerned with ensuring governmental favors for constituents and local businesses; few have stood for free markets or an end to crony capitalism. From Weicker on, most state Republicans have been content to serve as tax collectors for the welfare state. This is their legacy, too.

    Connecticut has spent the patrimony it collected over the prior 200 years and now it is broke, out of ideas, and out of luck.

    • bpuharic

      It’s really cute watching the anti-union right pretend like they know something. Some of the states in deepest debt are TX, LA, KY, etc…all red. And no unions. Here in PA our GOP governor just cut the education budget by a billion while giving $800M in tax subsidies to large corporations…none of which is unionized.

      But you go ahead. You got it all figured out. Don’t let the facts deter you

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