US Graduate Programs Attract Foreign Students, US Immigration Policy Loses Them
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  • Kavanna

    We need a guest worker program to provide for immigrants (students and non-students alike) who want to work here long-term, without necessarily becoming citizens. In the great wave of immigration c. 1870-1924, about half returned to their native countries. We need to puncture the sentimentalized mythology that surrounds this issue.

    This, along with the existing temporary visa and permanent-resident tracks, will also provide a good alternative for legalization of illegal residents, if that becomes necessary.

  • wigwag

    I have an idea; the state with by far the lowest per capita GDP in the nation is Mississippi. As America’s most useless state why don’t we expel it from the Union (maybe it could become a ward of Mexico) and let all those foreign STEM graduates become American citizens to replace the lethargic Missisippians who contribute next to nothing to American society.

  • lukelea

    Why do you ignore what is best for the countries they come from? To strip an underdeveloped country of its talented few strikes me as morally wrong.

  • ljgude

    My sense of meritocracy says keep ’em if they want to stay. America is doing more than enough to sabotage itself without turning away the best and the brightest. If we can tolerate illiterate masses of Mexicans, we can tolerate STEM graduates from anywhere. And nothing against the Mexicans- despite their illiteracy they will work hard if they can and within a few generations be real contributors to the US. Heck, the US turned my good for nothing Irish and German ancestors into productive people quicker than that.

    • Pincher Martin

      “And nothing against the Mexicans- despite their illiteracy they will work hard if they can and within a few generations be real contributors to the US. Heck, the US turned my good for nothing Irish and German ancestors into productive people quicker than that.”

      You seem to be unaware that some people of Mexican ancestry have already been in the United States for several generations, and the evidence shows they don’t catch up even after four to five generations. They still have less education, less income, less success than other native-born Americans.

      Your “good-for-nothing German ancestors” came from a land with both a better higher education system and more 19th-century intellectual accomplishments in science and math than the United States.

      • ljgude

        I happily admit that I don’t know the stats on long term upward mobility by Mexicans. Anecdotally, I’ve knows some that succeeded. I was being cavalier about my own ancestry. We had a first generation born in the US millionaire around the turn of the century. To be straight about it I want to see Hispanic immigrants succeed. I don’t think it is clear yet how it will work out, but it won’t if those immigrants don’t grow and change in an upwardly mobile way.

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