High Skilled Visas Run out Faster than Justin Bieber Tickets
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  • I will pay more attention to employers’ complaints if they say (and prove): “We’ve increased wages by 20 to 25 percent in the last two years and still can’t find the right employees.”
    Until they show that they are actually spending money to find and hire Americans, they have no effective argument that these pleas are just designed to hold down labor.

  • Federale

    So, why are there so many unemployed American tech workers, especially white males over age 40? The tech industry wants cheap foreigners, not more expensive Americans.

  • rheddles

    Employers do not particularly want cheaper workers as much as they want younger workers whose skills are more current. I’d be willing to bet not a lot of the H1-B holders are over 40 or moving directly into management positions.

    If cheaper labor were the issue, we’d see lots of recent domestic STEM graduates unemployed. I’d also be surprised if the recent STEM graduates were pulling down a significantly larger salary than the H1-Bs.

  • This is insane. Whatever issues of labor force competition surround this particular population, there is no question that admitting skilled professionals is a good deal for the USA. For a little context, consider that according to DHS, as of the end of the 2000s, there were some 6.7 million illegal immigrants living in the US from MEXICO ALONE. At the rate of 65,000 per year for this H1-B visa program, it would take 100 years for the number of skilled immigrants admitted under it to equal the Mexican illegal population. I repeat, this is insane.

  • “We’d like to see American students and educational institutions doing a better job so that the country needed to import less talent, but that’s a long term aspiration and shouldn’t be affecting immigration policy today.”

    I think the talent is here. In fact I know it is. Employers just don’t want to pay for it. From their point of view it makes more business sense to plunder the third world for this valuable resource at a fraction of the price. Whether this slows down the development of these poor countries — educationally, economically, socially — is no concern of theirs.

    Nor of our policy elites in Washington, who then go on to bemoan the fact that native-born Americans don’t choose engineering in greater numbers, as if the answer weren’t self-evident.

    The same logic applies to farm workers in California, roofers in Oregon, packing houses in the Mid-West: Our-native born population perversely prefers a wage or salary that will support an American standard of living. So we sell out the American people in the name of diversity, when it is really all about the income of the business class and their representatives in Washington (not to mention “their” bought-and-paid-for journalists in the main-stream media).

    There is so much hypocrisy in this betrayal of our nation, which itself has become a dirty word.

  • Frankly, it is the H1B visa system that helps to keep education lousy in the US. If American businesses had zero access – or the continued limited access – to high-skill foreign workers, maybe they’d begin addressing THEIR OWN core concerns here, to wit: ensuring an educated, thriving populace that not only could provide them the best workers, but also grow the incomes of Americans to buy their products and services. If business were working for their OWN best interests, they’d be working hard to get intelligent people on local school boards, becoming involved in curricula discussions nationally, working at all levels to rid the country of the ridiculously damaging “Schools of Education” as barriers to entry to teaching. As long as business has the H1B route to educated workers, why should they bother with helping to improve American education? And in the long run, when our population is sufficiently dumbed down because business just doesn’t care, are these businesses going to import consumers?

  • You write, “We’d like to see American students and educational institutions doing a better job so that the country needed to import less talent, but that’s a long term aspiration and shouldn’t be affecting immigration policy today.”

    I think we have the talent. In fact I know we do. It’s just that our high-tech industries don’t want to pay for it. From their point of view it makes more sense to plunder the third world for this valuable human resource at a fraction of the cost.

    The question of whether this hinders the development of these poor countries if of no concern of theirs.

    Nor of our bought-and-paid-for policy elites in Washington D.C. apparently, even though they pay lip-service to the poverty of underdeveloped world and bemoan the fact that more native-born Americans don’t choose engineering as a career.

    The same reasoning applies to the shortage of native-born farm workers in California, roofers in Oregon, meat-packers in the Mid-West, etc. In their perversity these Americans want a salary and a wage that will support a standard of living like the one they grew up in.

    The hypocrisy here is sickening. In the name of racial diversity and a cosmopolitan ideal of free trade America’s governing elites are selling out the nation, sowing seeds of discord for (quite possibly) generations to come, violating the social compact that holds our people together, and in the process undermining the power — the power of our example certainly, but also, in my judgment, the power of our industrial capacity — around the world.

  • US immigration system is fundamentally broken. It puts all sorts of obstacles in front of the best and brightest trying to enter US while doing very little to stop the flood of illegals who contribute very little. Also a little advice to all those occupying wall street. Stop bitching about how unfair US society is and start educating yourself.

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