Human Rights, and Wrongs

Aryeh Neier's new history of the human rights movement manages to be dull, impersonal and evasive all at the same time. But when read carefully, it shows signs that the movement's old guard is growing more uncomfortable with the unfettered idealism of the rising generation of human rights activists.

Appeared in: Volume 07, Number 6 | Published on: June 10, 2012

Damir Marusic is the associate publisher of The American Interest.

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