Morning Thoughts
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  • Luke Lea

    Any advice for the average Joe? No special talent, IQ 100, makes his living with his hands and his feet. Has better qualifications than half the population of working age

    How about advice for the half who are less qualified than Joe?

    Those in the quartile directly above Joe? IQ 105, 2 years of community college, background in retail sales, construction. Works with his hands and his feet.

    May I suggest, Professor Mead, that you are only thinking of the nerd minority, the class to which you belong? IQ greater than 115 (probably greater than 125), BA degree, makes his or her living with an educated brain.

    In other words you belong to that smart fraction makes the economy go — or, rather, that smart fraction is necessary in order for the economy to grow, but unless you can address the needs of the 80% of those seeking employment as hourly wage workers in non-supervisory positions, may I suggest you are not addressing the needs of the American people.

    In other words, you are just another elitist worrying about the future of people like him. What our democracy needs is a leader who thinks and cares about the average person — someone like Sarah Pahlin possibly? She may be a loose cannon — but, hey, with a loose cannon there is at least a possiblity it will shoot in the right direction. Which is more than you can say about any of the other candidates running for president, including the current occupant of the White House.

    I just put a Sarah Pahlin bumper sticker on my car, right beside my Obama 08. My wife and friends are scandalizes. My Democratic neighbors think it’s funny. But me? This dyed-in-the-wool, Yellow Dog Democrat is quite serious.

  • I think Luke Lea is being a little rough on the good professor.

    That advice applies to everyone, regardless of education level.

    The question is, does government policy help or hinder the young mother who wants to make breakfast burritos in her home to supplement her income so she can make a better life for herself and her kids?

    In places as diverse as New York City or here in southern Colorado, embarking on such a simple enterprise is fraught with a tangle of legalities and one must jump through a thousand fiery bureaucratic hoops.

  • WigWag

    The question is, does government policy help or hinder the young mother who wants to make breakfast burritos in her home to supplement her income so she can make a better life for herself and her kids?…In places as diverse as New York City or here in southern Colorado, embarking on such a simple enterprise is fraught with a tangle of legalities and one must jump through a thousand fiery bureaucratic hoops.” (Silverfiddle: September 11, 2011 at 10:07)

    I can’t speak for Southern Colorado, Silverfiddle, but you are mistaken about New York City. I just left the weekly farmers market that takes place every Sunday in Professor Mead’s neighborhood of Jackson Heights. It takes place in a park located on 34th avenue and 77th street. In addition to the stalls operated by the farmers there must have been 10 or 12 stands with men, women and even families selling breakfast burritos, roasted ears of corn, home made empanadas and absolutely delicious tamales.

    It was perfectly obvious that none of these stands were licensed; they were little more than folding tables with coolers stacked on the ground. Many of the stands had small weber grills that they were using to heat up the food. There was no government regulation here; there were no hoops to jump through and it was pefectly obvious that government was indifferent to the attempts of these enterprising small business people to earn a few extra dollars. None of the police cars patrolling the neighborhood took any notice of what these vendors were selling at all.

    At least here in Professor Mead’s beloved borough of Queens, the idea that the heavy hand of government stands in the way of micro businesses trying to keep their heads above water is little more than a myth.

  • Jim.

    @WigWag–

    So the heavy hand of government only comes down on the honest tradesman who tries to follow the its dictates?

    That doesn’t just break the law — it shatters the law to pieces.

    It also merely underlines the fact that law’s heavy hand must be set aside to allow individual initiative to flourish.

    Tell me this, WigWag: are you in favor of civil disobedience in the form of tax evasion and deliberate regulatory non-compliance?

    I wouldn’t have gotten than impression from your other posts.

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