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The Unamerican visa
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  • Unelected Leader

    The system is certainly abused by employers who can hold it over employees’ heads and pay them a little less money, etc. However, the pay must be adjusted by city. What’s considered a very reasonable, good wage in LA is more than needed even in Chicago.
    It should also be based on GPA and internships.
    I have an Indian friend who is absolutely brilliant. He graduated with a 3.9, and can really contribute here. His wage might not make the cut, however, because he works for a company in Chicago instead of Silicon Valley.

    • ——————————

      GPA is not a harbinger of the quality of one’s job ability or performance….

      • Suzy Dixon

        I think it is more so in engineering and the natural sciences. And of course GPA affects what kind of internships you get, as our friend intimated here.

        • ——————————

          I think drive, attitude, IQ, lifestyle, and a host of other things, affect future job performance a lot more than memorizing a bunch information in order to pass a series of tests…no matter what the field of study. Much of the info is forgotten after the test, and much of what is remembered is never used in the job. I’m not saying academics has no value, it does. I just think much of it, including GPA, is overrated.
          Perhaps better internships are offered because those who offer them believe in GPA.

          • Suzy Dixon

            I totally agree with you on liberal arts or the colleges of design, but not so much engineering. At the end of the day, many private sector and federal jobs alike have GPA minimums. If you graduate with less than a 3.0 you’re in an instant disadvantage because that’s often the cut off. You’re certainly considered to be less competitive. And we all know how difficult that can make things when you’re fresh out of school trying to land that first job and get your foot in the door

          • ——————————

            I do agree that GPA performance is used by employers for hiring purposes. I do understand that fully.
            What I personally don’t agree with is that GPA is as important as employers think it is when it comes to future job performance. Everybody relies on it, but I think it’s overrated. I think the things I listed in my last comment matter much more….but unfortunately society doesn’t see it that way.

            So that is what I meant in my first comment regarding GPA being an ‘accurate’ harbinger of actual future job performance.

          • Boritz

            A smart manager knows that a high GPA doesn’t indicate a high level of job related knowledge. Managers don’t really believe academic learning imparts any specifically applicable job knowledge. Witness that someone with two years on-the-job experience is considered a genius in comparison to anyone with only academic ‘experience’ regardless of their performance in that world. GPA is useful as a proxy for seriousness and ability to learn.

          • f1b0nacc1

            Also, where the grades were received means a whole lot more than what they are. Just as there is a difference between Caltech and some random community college, there is also an enormous difference between (most) American STEM programs and say Bangalore U.

  • FriendlyGoat

    Let me know when Trump or our GOP Congress significantly cuts the 85,000 to a far smaller number. One would think 100 of these per state would be enough for those otherwise-can’t-fill positions. Let’s see, that’s 5000. Does anyone who knows his state really believe each state needs 1,700 of these? Oh, I know they’re not equally distributed across states. But localizing this could “focus the mind” in a place like Mike Pence’s Indiana. I once knew some folks from Indianapolis who easily could have said “1700 of them here doing WHAT?”

    • Jim__L

      “Can’t-fill” means “HR can’t find”. Considering HR tends to be non-technical and rely on keywords / jargon which isn’t the same from one industry to another and may not even be the same from one company to another within an industry, they’ve got an impossible job.

      The best thing to do? Do away with the HR gatekeepers, and allow managers to hire based on networks and recommendations.

      Oh, and incentivize training programs within companies again. Whether a company invests in its people is really a random function of individual managers willing to do so. These are often fought by their bean-counting higher-ups because time invested in training is time taken out of floor work, which they’re given too few heads to cover anyway.

    • Ofer Imanuel

      I work in one of these tech companies. We are going out of our way to entice talented software engineers and computer science college students to apply to work for us. We are strategizing how best to approach them in order to get them to work for us. We certainly have multiple open head counts. Does that sound like we have too many good people?
      On the other side, the interview process is brutal, and if you don’t quite cut it, we will not hire you. I also understand that we have 7% unemployment rate in IT. Mostly people who aren’t quite up to snuff.
      BTW, this chasing of talent is quite common, at least where tech companies are common.

      • FriendlyGoat

        I don’t doubt the sincerity of either you or your company. I do doubt whether the typical Trump supporter is eager to hear about how “not up to snuff” Americans are and how we will continue to NEED buckets of high-skill immigrants instead.

        An implication to the contrary is precisely what Trump ran on. Now, the GOP is either going to deliver on “Hire American” in policy or it is going to be exposed as a bunch of liars. I’m betting on the latter.

  • Jim__L

    “you have to wonder if someone smart in the Trump Administration knows
    this new move could be read as an overture to the Zuckerbergs of the
    world.”

    Something else to wonder — when H1Bs put American-born tech workers out of the job market and crash their wage levels, are they going to vote for Democrats, or an anti-immigration candidate?

    • f1b0nacc1

      You are spot on here. Even in the deepest blue recesses of the tech world, there is a huge amount of anger about the misuse of H-1Bs by just about everyone who doesn’t own a company using them. I suspect that Trump would pick up more than a bit of support (or certainly cut into the support that the Dems have) by pushing such a policy.

  • f1b0nacc1

    H-1Bs are simply slave labor for tech firms, and should be eliminated outright. A fascinating piece I saw not too long ago showed a hugely disproportionate amount of the visas going to outsourcing firms. (https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/11/06/us/outsourcing-companies-dominate-h1b-visas.html?_r=0) So explain again just how are these ‘crucial skills not available in the US’ where they are being used to provide outsourced labor?

    End the program entirely, and go back to a case by case basis. Much as I am appalled to say this, FG has it right…I will take this seriously when I see a deep cut in the number of visas issued, or better still, see the whole misbegotten mess eliminated.

    I am fine with seeing a door opened for truly exceptional individuals to immigrate to the US, but simply permitting companies to acquire serfs that they cynically use to depress wages here.

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