Medical Money Pits
Medical Purgatories Plaguing Our Health Care System
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  • rheddles2

    The list is long, but few of that will be really achievable until we
    can a handle on the waste and inefficiencies currently making the system
    expensive and dysfunctional.

    The hubris! (not to mention the grammar and proofreading.)

    We’re talking about one sixth of the US economy. That’s the activity of about 18 million people. Does anyone really think the activities of that many people can be coordinated to get a handle on waste and inefficiency without military style command, control and incentive, not to mention military efficiency? The only other way is to let mutually voluntary transactions in the market do it. Anything in between will lead to the worst of both worlds.

    • Maynerd

      Agreed. This article appears to be written by a grad student who has never worked or spent any time in an ED setting.

      There’s plenty of waste in medicine. Two types in particular lead the pack: defensive medicine and the even more costly elaborate treatments for failing/demented individuals and/or futile end of life care particularly oncology patients. However, politicians are too gutless to address these thornier issues.

    • Jacksonian_Libertarian

      True, the only way to fix these inefficiencies is to let the consumers decide if they want to pay for more treatment, or even go somewhere else cheaper. The “Feedback of Competition” gets rid of all this bureaucratic inefficiency.

  • rheddles2

    The list is long, but few of that will be really achievable until we
    can a handle on the waste and inefficiencies currently making the system
    expensive and dysfunctional.

    The hubris! (not to mention the grammar and proofreading.)

    We’re talking about one sixth of the US economy. That’s the activity of about 18 million people. Does anyone really think the activities of that many people can be coordinated to get a handle on waste and inefficiency without military style command, control and incentive, not to mention military efficiency? The only other way is to let mutually voluntary transactions in the market do it. Anything in between will lead to the worst of both worlds.

    • Maynerd

      Agreed. This article appears to be written by a grad student who has never worked or spent any time in an ED setting.

      There’s plenty of waste in medicine. Two types in particular lead the pack: defensive medicine and the even more costly elaborate treatments for failing/demented individuals and/or futile end of life care, particularly oncology patients. However, politicians are too gutless to address these thornier issues. And most patients and their families are insulated from the true financial costs thanks to our 3rd party payment system.

    • Jacksonian_Libertarian

      True, the only way to fix these inefficiencies is to let the consumers decide if they want to pay for more treatment, or even go somewhere else cheaper. The “Feedback of Competition” gets rid of all this bureaucratic inefficiency.

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