University of Wisconsin Embraces "Stuff Learned" Model
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  • qet

    Isn’t this similar to the English &/or European model? Whenever I read of someone attending Oxford or Heidelberg University or some such, it always seems as if this is the routine they perform and not the American routine of a 4-year sequence of specifically scheduled hour-long classes.

    • Corlyss

      Interesting. I wonder if this was what Downing Street had in mind for it’s educational reform. The Economist ran a series of articles about 6 or 7 years ago addressing the need for reform in the English university system because American universities were running away with the money. The differential between the world’s higher education money that goes to American universities as opposed to those in Western Europe including England is ENORMOUS. It’s like the difference between the relative sizes of the premier collection of illuminated manuscripts in America (Pierpont Morgan) and the runner up (Walters Collection in Baltimore). You need a very large wingspan to represent it.

  • Corlyss

    “If the program works, it could allow motivated students to learn more and rack up credentials”

    Credentials in what? Living? Is “higher education” intended to produce credentials in living or credentials in a necessary and useful subject matter? If subject matter, designing off-sets for “stuff learned” is going to be the long pole in the tent as far as producing meaningful bodies of off-setable knowledge. This I gotta see!

  • Jacksonian_Libertarian

    I don’t think this will work, students require a structure of demands for homework, deadlines for papers, frequent quizzes and tests, in order to force the frequent recall of material in short term memory and thereby make it learned material in long term memory.

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