Mysteries of Egypt
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  • JJ

    Wishful thinking.

    The MB has a mass popular base of support, it has a fanatical, ruthless ideology with widespread appeal, and now it has power. Its opponents are many, but they are divided, many of them are tainted by association with the previous regime and with widespread corruption, and there is no outstanding leader among them. There is no democratic tradition to unite them.

    We’ve seen this movie before: Iran 1979 and even Russia 1917.

  • Mick The Reactionary

    Just 4 days ago Mr Mead wrote
    (blogs.the-american-interest.com/wrm/2012/08/09/egyptian-fury-over-airstrikes-and-firings/):

    “Egypt’s President Morsi, a former Muslim Brother, reacted resolutely to this week’s Sinai attacks,”

    I guess this statement is not operational anymore.
    I guess the Moslem Bro-in-Chief is now an elected dictator of Egypt.

    Barry Rubin, one of the very few sane ME experts, writes (rubinreports.blogspot.com/2012/08/egypt-there-goes-free-media.html):

    “all we were told about not having to worry because the generals would restrain the Brotherhood was false.
    … the idea that the army, and hence the government, may fear to act lest they lose U.S. aid will also be false.

    Mursi has also removed a constitutional decree regarding parliament. He is now the democratically elected dictator of Egypt.”

    Mr Mead. would you say that Chief Bro acted a bit too resolutely?

    I just have to copy my comment from before (blogs.the-american-interest.com/wrm/2012/08/09/egyptian-fury-over-airstrikes-and-firings) as it still perfectly valid:

    “Mr Mead, you are such an easy mark.

    Some incompetent jihadis in Sinai made it easy for the Chief Moslem Bro to put his people in security positions and undermine the Army.

    For all we know the Chief Moslem Bro has planned the Sinai act.”

    And now we are virtually certain that Chief Moslem Bro is behind it all.

  • Kris

    [email protected], you’ve saved me the effort of positively noting your previous comment.

    I’d hypothesize that the top military leaders have
    1. despaired of American support
    2. realized that much of the lower ranks are on the other side
    3. decided that Egypt’s situation is hopeless
    4. have already managed to get a good deal of their wealth out of the country.

    How long until we find out that Tantawi and his confreres have all suddenly developed medical conditions which require overseas care?

  • Kris

    An alternate (though not necessarily contradictory) hypothesis.

  • Mister G

    It appears that most of the posters here are blind, and i am in agreement with some of your analysis. It is funny that Tatawani and Ennan is now advisors to Morsi, and it is obvious that they will be calling the shots and Morsi will be a mere puppet.

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