Fresh Violence in Nigeria Contradicts MSM’s Sunny Africa Spin
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  • Daniel Ehighalua

    The Nigerian narrative was tentatively okay until the Jonathan government. He clearly has failed to come to grips with the nature of the Nigerian ethno-religious question; which essentially views politics and power from the lenses of ethnicity, while religion feeds and reinforces that lust. I still insist that the narrative of ‘the ominous rise in Muslim-Christian tension’ is an ephemeral one, which will recede with the right leadership. ‘Nigeria will truly burn, or go up in flames when oil dries up’

  • Jacksonian Libertarian

    99% of all terrorist attacks are made by Islamic males between the ages of 16 and 45. Muslims are attacking and persecuting every religious group they come into contact with, including Jews, Hindu, Christian, Buddhist, Bahia, etc… The fact is Muslims have been murdering innocent people in the name of God, all over the world for decades.

  • Brendan Doran

    Well said. In particular the shot across the bow of MSM. Democracy is not for everyone at all times…we know this from our own History.

  • Brendan Doran

    I wish they would teach how the Founding and immediately following generation built the superstructure of democracy on the Founders Republic. Democratic/Republican Societies were self organized everywhere..a la Tea Party and the people understood clearly what they wanted but also their responsibilities. It almost couldn’t have worked except in Anglo-Saxon countries at that time, and it was a [darn] chancy thing here and in England. Perhaps in teaching more of the nuts and bolts from 1787 to 1830 we’d understand how difficult it is..

  • Brendan Doran

    And let’s not forget to teach how key Washington and the guiding hand of the other Founders was so key to it not all exploding.

  • Jeff Jarvis said on This Week in Google that reporters saw thier job as preparing the news for an audience and that they just didn’t get it that they were just another node on the network. Vis Media is doing an excellent job of questioning some of the more factually challenged narratives. But their is actually a scarcity of reporters who go out and do original fact gathering in the troubled areas o the world and try to present an unvarnished report of it as they can. I suspect that tradttionally trained journalists don’t see thier work as finished until they have plugged the facts into some politically or culturally acceptable preexisting trope. To see the difference i’d suggest following the work of Michael J Totten to see the difference between an independent journalist and a legacy journalist.

  • thibaud

    Mr. Mead, did you even bother to read the balanced, professional, on-the-ground NYT dispatch you link to?

    Here’s how it begins [emphasis mine]:

    “DAKAR, Senegal — After 50 years of independence, the path to democracy does not follow an obvious, straight line in this region, just as it did not in the West — the model for most citizens here — *** where it was centuries in the making *** .

    “That is the most obvious lesson from the *** sharply contrasting experiences *** of two West African nations over the past week: Senegal, where power is being transferred peacefully after a fair election on Sunday, and Mali, where after two decades of relative success, democracy was snuffed out in a military coup on Thursday….”
    /end

    Mead’s attacks on “the legacy media” have become an embarrassment.

    A few days ago he asserted, in the face of all the factual evidence, that “Americans absolutely hate” Obamacare – when both Pew and Gallup show the nation as evenly divided on the bill.

    Now he lashes out at “the media” – and leads off by referencing a dispatch from the granddad of quality global news coverage, the BBC!

    And then he goes out of his way to trash a genuine professional, a real reporter who actually lives and works in Africa – as opposed to taking cushy junkets to, say St Petersburg and then making inane and ignorant posts on Russia after returning to New York.

    Just to show how over-the-top (not to mention unfair and childish) are Mead’s sneers, here are recent dispatches from Africa by the Times’ Adam Nossiter.

    In these professional, balanced, judicious article summaries, see if you can detect any merit whatsoever in Mead’s ridiculous accusations:

    Abdoulaye Wade Keeps His Hold Over Senegal
    By ADAM NOSSITER
    Despite a drubbing in the last election, Abdoulaye Wade, the former Senegalese president, remains prominent in national politics, having showered gifts on supporters while in office. June 18, 2012

    In Timbuktu, Mali Rebels and Islamists Impose Harsh Rule
    By ADAM NOSSITER
    Rebels who captured what had been a tolerant and easygoing city in northern Mali have imposed hard-edged Islamic rule, prompting many residents to flee. June 3, 2012

    Mali Mob Assaults Interim President After Pact
    By ADAM NOSSITER; FABIEN OFFNER CONTRIBUTED REPORTING FROM BAMAKO, MALI.
    The president, Dioncounda Traoré, was beaten unconscious by a pro-military crowd after a deal was reached for the leader of the ruling junta to step aside.
    May 22, 2012

    In Algeria, Belittling Elections, but No Arab Spring
    By ADAM NOSSITER; HADJER GUENANFA CONTRIBUTED REPORTING.
    The military-backed government’s victories in recent elections brought scorn on the streets of Algiers, but no Arab Spring-like marches, rallies or demonstrations.
    May 19, 2012

    Mali Uprising No Threat to Junta Leader’s Plans
    By ADAM NOSSITER
    May 12, 2012

  • Sundog

    “It is the duty of news organizations to report the actual news, not to fluff up the feel-good narratives they wish would come true.”

    That’s true, but irrelevant. These are not news organizations. They are propaganda outlets, and their mission has nothing to do with reporting the actual news.

  • MarkJ

    I’m sure Obama would be interested in this story…if it weren’t so darn distracting to his golf game.

  • JL

    Adam,

    Please tell us which of your posts deals with the religious violence of muslims slaughtering Christians?

    Henry

  • fred17

    We haven’t had a responsible MSM for a very long time. The Internet is the only place to put together the real facts and understand the truth. Actual truth means nothing to the MSM anymore

  • Sorry to pick, but shouldn’t it be “Muslim-Christian violence” or “Muslim on Christian violence” to give a flavor of what’s to follow?

  • HC

    ‘Mead’s attacks on “the legacy media” have become an embarrassment.

    A few days ago he asserted, in the face of all the factual evidence, that “Americans absolutely hate” Obamacare – when both Pew and Gallup show the nation as evenly divided on the bill.

    Now he lashes out at “the media” – and leads off by referencing a dispatch from the granddad of quality global news coverage, the BBC!’

    The BBC may have deserved a reputation for quality coverage decades ago, but today it has a reputation for bias and politicized coverage. Their domestic coverage embodies a political agenda, their international coverage is selectivemfaulty and politically correct, and has been for at least 20 years.

    Mr. Meade’s use of the phrase ‘absolutely hate’ is an exaggeration, but a majority certainly oppose it and have since mid-2009, when the details of it began to become apparent. The polls that show an evenly divided country are written with the intent of producing that illusion, the general run of reliable polls shows a fairly clear negative view. Further, the 2010 election was primarily about Obamacare, and its results were overwhelming.

    The question is whether the NYT, BBC, etc are _consciously_ biasing their coverage to fit their agenda, or whether it’s unconscious. The truth is probably somewhere in between.

    The worldview that permeates much of the press (and the elite West generally) is that the global acceptance of liberal democracy, secularism, and materialism are _inevitable_.

    They simply can’t imagine that the world might reject the post-60s values and beliefs entirely, and this affects their thinking and (in the case of the media) their coverage of events. It leads them to play down things that are worthy of attention and to emphasise things that are often trivial or ephemeral.

    It isn’t limited to the press, either. The Western elites of today’s world are so isolated, so insulated, that they have a tendency to project their own motivations and values on alien situations. Look at the idealistic misperceptions about the Arab Spring 18 months ago, for ex, including from some right-wingers. Less than 2 years later, it’s clear that the protestors in the square did not represent the general view in Egypt, as the romanticised Spring has degenerated into a (predictable) choice between the old military regime and Islamism.

    This was widely foreseen…except by the press and Western elites.

  • Kris

    [email protected]: “And then he goes out of his way to trash a genuine professional, a real reporter who actually lives and works in Africa”

    I would assume that our host’s ire is directed not so much at this wonderful chap as at the portion of this article that most NYT readers will content themselves with, the headline: “Across a Continent, Louder Voices and Steadier Steps Toward Democracy”.

  • thibaud

    Adam Nossiter is on the ground, doing the hard work of actual reportage with courage and integrity, presenting analysis in a reasonable, balanced, fair-minded and intelligent way.

    Mead’s attacks on real reporters like Nossiter will not change anyone’s view of the NYT, but they will definitely lower people’s estimation of Mead’s judgment and character.

  • Andrew

    The Christians will be quiet for only so long. Then it will get ugly.

    Stop it now. Or it is going to get really bad for the muzzies.

  • thibaud

    Mead keeps propping up his failing straw man about “the MSM’s optimistic narrative on Africa,” but here’s what the Times’ Adam Nossiter, a real journalist who writes real dispatches from Africa, _actually wrote_ in the story that Mead keeps linking to. NYT’s Nossiter (emphasis added]:

    “After 50 years of independence, the path to democracy DOES NOT FOLLOW AN OBVIOUS, STRAIGHT LINE IN [Africa], just as it did not in the West — the model for most citizens here — where it was centuries in the making.

    “That is the most obvious lesson from the SHARPLY CONTRASTING EXPERIENCES OF TWO WEST AFRICAN NATIONS over the past week: Senegal, where power is being transferred peacefully after a fair election on Sunday, and Mali, where after two decades of relative success, democracy was snuffed out in a military coup on Thursday.

    “Across the region, democracy, even AMID SETBACKS, seemed to INCH FORWARD….”

    /end excerpt

    Ironic that Mead accuses a real journalist of extreme “optimism”, given that Via Meadia so breathlessly waxes Pollyanna-ish whenever there’s a trendlet that can be spun to support its moral narrative about the Death of the State.

    The Times correspondent whom Mead tries to slime with his repeated sneers is not spinning an “optimistic narrative”; he’s reporting more facts, and firsthand, than you will find in a week full of Via Meadia posts.

    Here are other recent fact-based, professional, balanced dispatches from the Times’ Adam Nossiter:

    Abdoulaye Wade Keeps His Hold Over Senegal
    By ADAM NOSSITER June 18, 2012

    In Timbuktu, Mali Rebels and Islamists Impose Harsh Rule
    by ADAM NOSSITER

    Mali Mob Assaults Interim President After Pact
    By ADAM NOSSITER May 22, 2012

    In Algeria, Belittling Elections, but No Arab Spring
    By ADAM NOSSITER
    May 19, 2012

    Mali Uprising No Threat to Junta Leader’s Plans
    By ADAM NOSSITER May 12, 2012

    Mr Mead, please stop sliming real journalists who do the hard work of reporting real stories professionally, on the ground. It reflects badly on you.

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