India To US: Not Too Close!
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  • Anthony

    Alas, changing world power dynamics WRM: “India wants to be a superpower in its own right rather than a character actor….”

    Independent nations make independent choices premised on their calculation of strategic interests – an order takes shape perhaps.

  • Looking into the future is it is easy to imagine many scenarios where India and China are the dominant world powers and the US becomes an historical curiosity like the UK. But there is a fly in the declinist’s ointment. Agriculture. Of course all those Asian billions may be thriving on vat grown beefsteak, but I kind of doubt it. To be serious for a moment, I admire many things Chinese, T’ai Chi and Taoism among them, but I think India is the wildcard in any calculus of the future. It is chaotic, dynamic and creative. It has already thrown up slum dog millionaires and will likely throw up phenomena like slum dog Einsteins, and plenty of other unknown unknowns. So, they gave us the brush off. Seems like anyone can do that these days.

  • john

    If I rephrase your article, a very different picture emerges

    India picked the French Rafale because it is infinitely superior as a 4+ gen aircraft to the F-16 the US offered (a warplane incidentally Pakistan already has)

    India still buys Iranian oil because its people are desperately poor and still die of hunger in the millions. Bending to US whims on Iran means sacrificing much-needed development with no easy alternative.

  • Carlos de Souza

    Lorenz,
    India has a long, long way to go yet. Right now we need oil from whoever can reliably supply it to us at a reasonable price. If the US could allow a terrorist country like Pakistan to acquire a nuclear weapon, why not let Iran get one as well ?? Anyways, Iran is no threat to India, so why should we not buy oil & gas from them ???

  • Indian

    US should have not tried to dump an out of date 1970s fighter with no tech transfer and American policy of isolation/sanctioncs got us into trouble in Myanmar. We co-operated with the Americans only to find out they went into Chinese hands.

    And please for god’s sake, don’t bang the door behind you if you wish to walk out.

    OUT!!!

    Thanks!

  • If the United States were smart, they would do anything to sell Brazil Super Hornets, as Brazil is also inclined to buy Rafales.

  • “. . . I think India is the wildcard in any calculus of the future. It is chaotic, dynamic and creative. It has already thrown up slum dog millionaires and will likely throw up phenomena like slum dog Einsteins, and plenty of other unknown unknowns. So, they gave us the brush off. Seems like anyone can do that these days.”

    Then again, if “brushoffs” are among the things helping to make us Americans a humbler, gentler, and so proportionately more EFFECTIVE nation than we’ve been these past 10+ years, so much the better, perhaps?

  • Walter Grumpius

    India will surely become an increasingly more important regional power, and one to be duly considered in all global calculations.

    But India ain’t gonna become a “superpower.” Not. Gonna. Happen.

    John Lennon was once asked if he thought Ringo Starr was the best drummer in rock n roll.

    Lennon’s assessment: “He isn’t even the best drummer in the Beatles.”

  • kris

    “India wants to be a superpower in its own right rather than a character actor in an American John Wayne movie”

    Can you blame them? Who would want to be an Indian in an old Western?

    More seriously (and generally), I am often reminded of the famous Bernard Lewis quote (which he attributed to a Turkish general): “The problem with having the Americans as your allies is that you never know when they’ll turn around and stab themselves in the back.”

    (Not that some US-aligned countries are entirely innocent of the occasional perverse contrariness.)

    And signing off with some cultcha: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNIZofPB8ZM

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