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Erdogan Blames The Jews For Egypt


For Turkey’s Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan, it’s Jews all the way down. The Gezi Park protests were apparently the fault of a shadowy “interest rate lobby”, and now he informs us that Israel was behind Egypt’s ouster of its Islamist president Mohammed Morsi:

“What do they say in Egypt? Democracy is not the ballot box. What is behind it? Israel. We have in our hands documentation,” Erdogan said in comments broadcast by TRT state television. […]

“Before the 2011 elections, during a session in France, the justice minister and an intellectual from France – he’s Jewish too – they used exactly this comment: ‘Even if the Muslim Brotherhood wins the election, they will not win because democracy is not the ballot box’,” Erdogan said.

“That is exactly what happened,” he said, without naming either the minister nor the French intellectual.

Erdogan may have been up late watching YouTube, Reuters speculates, when he came across a June 2011 video clip featuring AI board member Bernard-Henri Levy and Israeli MK Tzipi Livni discussing, among other things, the low likelihood of the Muslim Brotherhood respecting democratic opposition. Erdogan himself provided no other ‘documentation’.

The White House swiftly denounced this latest drivel, calling the remarks “offensive” in no uncertain terms. Is Erdogan firmly in the ‘former Middle East ally’ column?

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  • wigwag

    Just a few months ago Morsi called Jews “the descendants of apes and pigs.” Erdogan is spewing one anti Semitic comment after the next. Isn’t time for Barack Obama and his allies in the neoconservative and isolationist wings of the Republican Party to admit that their theory of empowering “moderate” Islamists through electoral politics is a miserable failure?

    Of course the strategy was doomed from the start; to believe in it our brilliant foreign policy gurus had to avert their eyes from the fact that the Islamist allies they were depending on were never moderate in the first place. Their tactics may have been different than the Salafi types but their aims were the same. Both the “moderates” that Obama, Dubya and their idiotic allies were banking on and the violent extremists both believed fervently in Jihad.

    Despite their desire to depict Jihad as something other than it is; what both political parties in the United States missed is that Jihad and democracy are simply incompatible.

    As bad as the situation in the Middle East is, as Anericans we face a bigger problem. What we’ve just witnessed is a total and complete failure of the American foreign policy establishment. Every major faction that comprises that establishment is equally culpable. If our diplomats were surgeons, they would be sued for malpractice; if they were lawyers (actually many of them are) they would be disbarred for ineffective assistance of counsel.

    The “experts” of all stripes who are responsible for the epic failure of American foreign policy need to be put out to pasture.

    I was going to say they should all be fired; let them all find a new profession like driving cabs. But then it occurred to me; would you get into a cab driven by one of these dunces?

    I wouldn’t.

    • Anthony

      Hello WigWag, well said as always. But a question, is Islam fundamentally incompatible with democracy (Islamic state by definition obverse of democracy)? Or does Iron Law of Oligarchy as well as authoritarian and hierarchical institutions play factor also. And yes U.S. foreign policy elites have been muddling through…

      • wigwag

        It’s always nice to hear your voice in cyberspace, Anthony,
        I certainly don’t think Islam is fundamentally incompatible with democracy but I do think what we have come to know as “political Islam” is. The same would be true for political Judaism or political Christianity.
        The problem with the view of American liberal internationalists and neoconservatives is that they have a remarkably dumbed down version of what democracy is. All we here about is how the Muslim Brothers in Egypt (or their cousins, Hamas in Gaza) won an election fair and square. What myopic American pundits and politicians don’t realize is that elections are the least important part of democracy not the most important part.
        The bedrock upon which modern democracy is constructed is a respect for pluralism; nowhere in the modern Islamic world is pluralism respected even in the most progressive Muslim countries like Malaysia or Indonesia.
        Countries that make it a crime punishable by imprisonment or death to convert from Islam to another religion can never be considered democratic no matter how many fair elections they hold. Yet this simple reality seems to have escaped the notice of the Tom Friedmans and Robert Kagans of the world.
        For your information, the vast majority of Muslim majority nations make apostasy a crime. While many pundits hold Indonesia and Malaysia up as examples, even in these nations, conversion from Islam puts the apostate at grave risk to life and limb.
        By the way, there is nothing unique to Islam about all of this. Pre-reformation Europe, dominated as it was by Roman Catholicism, was also incapable of democracy. If Israel enshrined the Torah as its Constitution it would not be a democratic nation either.
        It seems to me that a respect for diversity and at least some dispersal of political power are the first critical elements that have to be present before democracy is born. None of this strikes me as particularly complicated. Why George W. Bush, Barack Obama and a majority of the United States Congress is too dimwitted to figure it out is a mystery to me.
        None of this means that religion has to be excluded from the public square for democracy to flourish. After all, our founding fathers found the liberal principles that they expounded rooted in scripture.
        But a society that references the Koran as its most important legal document will never be a democracy in any way that has meaning to those of us who believe in liberalism.

        • Anthony

          Thoughtful and informative reply; and you’re quite right: “elections are the least important part of democracy”. The elevation of parochial values to the realm of the sacred (as state governing principle) is a license to both dismiss other people’s interests and to justify pluralism’s elimination. Yet at bottom, inclusive political and economic institutions foster democracy and categorical imperatives via the immanence may impede state organizational governing patterns. So, historical societal institutional arrangements (in this case Islam – the indefinite good it promises brooks no compromise politically) may be incompatible with Western concepts of democracy (unless there’s a critical juncture).

        • FrankArden

          Not to disagree, but I have the impression that Morocco and Jordan are, or will become I hope, exceptions to this.

          Compared their regional sister states in the Middle East and North Africa, these two constitutional and parliamentary monarchies have made enormous progress toward democratic liberalism and constitutionalism with women’s representation guaranteed in parliament and general suffrage.

          Although, Islam remains the state religion in both, their laws favor tolerance for religious freedom, are relatively generous.

          Examples of capital punishments have been declining for years.

          They are US allies and allies with Israel.

          Christian and Jews are proctected minorities and even hold positions

          • wigwag

            Frank, if the topic of apostasy in the Islamic world interests you, let me recommend a riveting book that I am quite sure you will enjoy; “The Tenth Parallel: Dispatches from the Fault Line Between Christianity and Islam.” At only $8.99 at Amazon, it’s a bargain.


            The author is a brilliant young poet and journalist, Eliza Griswold. Perhaps you have heard of her father, Frank Griswold; unless I am mistaken, he was a former Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church.

            The book describes Eliza’s travels roughly along the tenth parallel which is the geographic focal point where Christian and Muslim populations tend to intersect.

            Griswold is a wonderful writer and I suspect a relatively progressive young lady. She describes in unsparing detail what she discovered on her sojourn in this part of the world; suffice it to say, it was not pretty.

            In country after country she found Christian missionaries attempting to convert Muslims and Muslim missionaries attempting to convert Christians.

            These efforts were often accompanied by violence and Griswold tells the story at some length about how far Islamic governments are willing to go to insure that Muslims do not even thinking about becoming Christians.

            In the Philippines, a mostly Roman Catholic nation, Griswold describes the horrendous violence that takes place between the Christian majority and the Muslim minority. In Indonesia and Malaysia, two nations that many Westerners think represent moderate Islam, Griswold describes in terrible detail how poorly the Christian minority is treated.

            The book is well worth a look.

          • FrankArden

            Thank you for your suggestion. I just signed off of Amazon with a $10.48 (incl. shipping) order for a hardcover of that book. I’m sure I’ll enjoy it and I really look forward to reading it.

            Too, you’re right. Eliza is the Most Reverend Bishop Frank Griswold’s daughter.

            I would that he should still be the presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church rather than the Lear Jet Pilot and Oceanographer, Madame Katherine Jefforts Schiori, Most Reverend, etc.

            You’re also right about the monarchies of Morocco and Jordan. Especially Jordan.

            I listened to an NPR interview with King Abdullah a couple of months ago. He said if his people wanted him to go, he would. I’m sure he has plenty of money stashed in the banks of New York and elsewhere.

  • Vadim Pashkov

    You are correct Erdogan , Jews control the World and you are next.
    One day you will come to your bedroom and there will Massad waiting you for and it will be time to die.

  • USNK2

    “… Is Erdogan firmly in the ‘former Middle East ally’ column?” is a strange way to end, Mr. Mead. Turkey is a full NATO member, a mutual defense treaty.
    It does not matter who is the prime minister, nor what he says.
    All NATO members are official allies of the USA.

  • Atanu Maulik

    For the Muslims and the Left, Jews come closest to fulfilling all the criteria for God. They are omnipotent, omniscient. They control the world of finance, media, art, entertainment, science. They can poison rivers, melt polar ice caps, alter people’s consciousness and memories. I wounder why do they keep up with this futile struggle with this all powerful entity. Just surrender.

  • Jacksonian_Libertarian

    Erdogan dreams of becoming the Caliph, and he believes taking whacks at the Jews will ingrate himself with all Muslims. He is a shallow and transparent megalomaniac, who isn’t fooling anyone with all his pandering.

  • Kavanna

    Hey, didn’t the Jews leave Egypt some while back … ? 🙂

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