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WaPo: Chen’s Safety Cannot Be Guaranteed By Chinese Diplomats

This is another update to Via Meadia’s China coverage, which has stepped up following the extraordinary stories of Bo Xilai and Chen Guangcheng.

It seemed to us here that Chen might have changed his tone after receiving some unpleasant visits from some of China’s more dangerous police bureaus.

The Washington Post has confirmed our suspicions: The Chen deal, they say, was negotiated in good faith by both sides. The problem, says the Post, is that Chinese diplomats “have no sway over a Chinese security apparatus beholden only to the upper reaches of the ruling Communist Party.”


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  • Anthony

    Chen Guangcheng is A Chinese citizen; is there much U.S. can do beyond hectoring and lecturing?

  • thibaud

    After this, why should anyone believe the promises that Chinese diplomats make? What point is there to talking with them instead of going directly to the Party?

  • Cunctator

    I have to apologise in advance for questioning the intelligence (and professional competence) of the US diplomats in advance of Chen’s departure from the embassy. I am not a China expert, I have never visited the country, and certainly do not claim to be at all skilled in diplomatese. However, I would never in a million years have trusted any guarantee offered by a Chinese official — in fact, I would have assumed from the outset that Beijing’s main aim was the apprehension of the dissident. But, frankly speaking, those Chinese officials probably did not need to exercise the arts of dissimulation too much in their dealings with the US Embassy. Little did they realise that the goal of the Obama Administration appears to have been the same as that of the Chinese government.

  • Brendan Doran

    In other breaking news Dog bites Man. White Swans have been seen.

    And you don’t go to a Clinton for help empty handed.

  • Luke Lea

    “Chinese diplomats “have no sway over a Chinese security apparatus beholden only to the upper reaches of the ruling Communist Party.”

    Nor do the various factions in the upper reaches have unity of purpose. The back-stabbing, double-crossing, blackmailing, and constant jockeying for power — these are standard operating procedures in the Chinese political world, and have been for as far back as we have any detailed knowledge (centuries, not just decades). Clientelism rules, not unlike in late republican Rome.

  • Corlyss

    ‘The problem, says the Post, is that Chinese diplomats “have no sway over a Chinese security apparatus beholden only to the upper reaches of the ruling Communist Party.”’

    This is laughable, considering the administration has access to sooooo much evidence of that very fact. The administration, no doubt, is trying to spin the message thru the world’s most credulous and uncritical media when it comes to the first black president in history. It just doesn’t pass the smell test. The administration can’t claim they were “born yesterday,” even as Obama would like everyone to think “how could he know?” They stand at the current end of 230+ years of diplomatic and security history. We remember that the 2009 Nobel Prize winner feted the jailers of the 2010 Nobel Prize winner.

    I swear, the media and the president must think we voters are dumber than a box of rocks and have the memory capacity of a goldfish.

  • t0r67foulvjjcfxte

    How can the deal have been negotiated in good faith if the Chinese diplomats knew they didn’t have influence to guarantee the agreement? They offered something they couldn’t deliver. That is not good faith, it’s bad faith.

  • gracepmc

    The problem seems to be more with the US diplomats and Clinton’s dropping the ball.

  • vanderleun

    You’d think that diplomats in the embassy of the United States in Beijing would have a scintilla of an iota of a jot of a clue on how China actually works these days in terms of realpolitick ….. you’d think that, but you would be wrong.

  • Soul

    Sad, I hope someway is found to remove Chen and family out of the country.

    I can recall my Chinese friend trying to explain to me in the past about how un-centralized his countries government can be. Seems this might be an example of that.

  • Luke Lea

    Control of Chinese Regime’s Armed Forces Raised by Dispute With Philippines:

    Who’s in charge?

  • Luke Lea

    “Photos posted on the Internet by Chinese netizens show journalists waiting at the entrance of the hospital which Chen was taken to. Inside the hospital stand a large group of police wearing steel helmets. A netizen ridiculed the image, saying: ‘[Chen is] the most important patient in China.'”

    Read the whole thing:

  • Luke Lea

    What Happens When You Negotiate With China?

    Good tv discussion:

  • silverfiddle

    This is a putrid and shameful display by the United States, kicking a dissident back to his totalitarian jailers and kowtowing to our Red Overlords.

    It’s hard to stand up to someone when you’re trillions in hock to them…

    This is the real New World Order.

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