The Right Not To Be Lonely
The American Interest
The Right Not To Be Lonely







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Relevant Reading:

Being Sure of Each Other: An Essay on Social Rights and Freedoms
Kimberley Brownlee, Oxford University Press, 2020, $50

What are the ethical implications of the pandemic of loneliness that has been sweeping the modern world well before the COVID pandemic made us all grapple with social isolation? Do we have a human right to not be lonely, and is there, therefore, an ethical imperative towards openness to others? And how do we balance these rights and obligations with the need to ostracize people who are dangerous to society?

Philosopher Kimberley Brownlee joins our host Richard Aldous to discuss her new book, and to help unpack how her research can help us think about our current challenging times.

And don’t forget to the subscribe to the show on your podcast provider, leave a review, and follow @aminterest¬†on Twitter.

Published on: September 24, 2020
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