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Turning Points
Who Killed Musa Sadr?

The legacy of Iran’s efforts to shape the Middle East stretches back even before the revolution. A retired Israeli Brigadier General reviews what is known about the influential Shiite cleric’s murder, who was behind it—and what might have been.

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(Wikimedia Commons)
Explainer
How the Framers Thought About Impeachment

The threat of impeachment being employed more often might just put some ballast back into our constitutional system.

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(Bert Flint / Shutterstock)
The Empty Throne
Putin the Not-So-Omnipotent

Yes, Putin still sits in the Kremlin—but after 20 years in power and a long summer of protests, there are signs that it’s the siloviki who are now calling the shots.

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(Wikimedia Commons)
Empire of Liberty
The Personality of American Power

Challenges to America’s role abroad are more likely to lead to a strategic restoration than a realist revolution.

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(John Hultberg, Art Institute of Chicago)
Things Fall Apart
Brexit Beyond Britain

Brexit is a sign of deeper trends that are roiling the European continent. Improving the health of our democracies will be critical if Europe wants to express an alternative to the illiberalism and unruly populism that are taking hold.

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(Wikipedia Commons)
Spheres of Justice
Who Deserves Asylum?

Those who argue we have an immigration police state may well be right. But the alternative is an ever-larger pool of exploited labor at the bottom of U.S. society.

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William Charles, “The Present State of Our Country” (Wikimedia Commons)
Make America Whole Again
Here’s the Deal: 12 Rules to Restore Our Social Contract

America is large, and it contains multitudes—but in our age of stark polarization, there’s a basic American Deal that desperately needs representation.

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(Wikimedia Commons)
Walt Whitman at 200
The Bard and His Democracy

Walt Whitman was pen pals with Emerson, idolized Lincoln, and sought to “sing America” by finding grandeur in the everyday. Two hundred years later, he’s still an American original.

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Herman Melville, Portrait by Joseph O. Eaton (Wikimedia Commons)
Herman Melville at 200
Bartleby, the Safe-Spacer

Melville’s classic story is a blast of truth from 1853 on behalf of coddled lives in 2019.

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“The Great Rapprochement” (Wikimedia Commons)
TAI Conversations
Breakfast with a Brexiteer

Historian Andrew Roberts speaks with TAI about leadership—and the case for a no-deal Brexit.

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We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.