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American Ideals and Interests
The Dangerous Blinders of Realism

Hans Morgenthau, the father of “realism” in foreign policy, had a rather unrealistic understanding of statesmanship.

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Thirty Years Later
Laughter As Medicine

To fight populism, we need to adopt a response not just for coping, but for overcoming and ultimately restoring decency and civilized discourse: Laughter.

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Populism in Spain
The Paradox of the Shrinking Center

Centrism as a governing philosophy remains popular in Spain, even as voters turn on centrist politicians for their incompetence.

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Martin Haeusler, via Wikimedia Commons
Reagan's Westminster Address
Who Do We Think We Are?

Reagan’s answer to the question was clear and stirring. We are “free people, worthy of freedom, and determined not only to remain so but to help others gain their freedom as well.”

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The Fight for Latin America
The Narcoregimes Strike Back

Latin American dictators are amplifying legitimate public discontent across the region, and wielding it as a potent political weapon.

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Photo by Knight Foundation via Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)
State Failure and Political Decay
The Silent War in Mexico

The drug-fueled violence in Mexico long ago surpassed conventional definitions for civil war. So why aren’t we taking it seriously?

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(Wikimedia Commons)
Oral History
Voices from the Berlin Wall

A new book by Iain McGregor offers a vivid account of daily life in divided Berlin, collecting the stories of ordinary people who lived, worked, and served on either side of Checkpoint Charlie.

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(Wikimedia Commons)
Reagan’s Westminster Speech
America’s Security Is Still Tied to the Fate of Freedom

Reagan was right to be optimistic about democracy in 1982—and his words still shed a light on challenges we face in 2019.

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Reagan's Westminster Address
The Rallying Cry We Need

Five ways the address continues to inspire, instruct, and inform contemporary efforts to renew democracy.

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Photo by Tim Mossholder from Pexels
E Pluribus Unum
A Blinkered Case for Nationalism

In his new book, Rich Lowry makes a plausible case for an inclusive brand of American nationalism—but fails to see the malignancy of the version that is currently warping our politics.

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We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.