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Ville Miettinen, via Wikimedia Commons
Juggernaut
India’s Pollution Problem—And Ours

India’s growth can zero out all the world’s environmental measures.

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Volodymyr Zelensky as Vasyl Petrovych Holoborodko in Servant of the People
Putinism in Peril?
Russian-Ukrainian Relations in the Zelensky Era

The Kremlin has given Volodymyr Zelensky a chilly reception, but the comedian-cum-President may have the last laugh.

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Jackson Pollock, “War” (1947)
Netflix and Kill
How Film Can Shake Up the Debate About War

Two under-appreciated recent films offer fresh and complementary perspectives about conflicts and why we intervene in them.

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(Wikipedia Commons)
Ruffining Feathers
The Man Who Hates Macron

Francois Ruffin is an odd avatar for populism—in part because he hails from the very class he is critiquing.

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Wikimedia Commons
Slaughterhouse-Five at 50
A Triumphant Failure

There’s nothing intelligent to say about a massacre, wrote Kurt Vonnegut of his book about the firebombing of Dresden. So why are we still reading it a half-century later?

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© Getty Images
Solidarity Needed
Sudan on the Cusp of Democratic Change

The West has to remember that what happens in the coming days and weeks could shape the political future of its 40 million people for years to come.

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Seán Keating, “Men of the South” (Crawford Art Gallery)
An Irish Homecoming
Your Roots Shall Make Ye Free

In his new memoir, Michael Brendan Dougherty rages against the atomizing effects of modern liberalism—and finds comfort in the binding ties of family, nation, and Church.

Strategic Delusions
Why Germany Coddles Iran

Berlin’s split with Washington on Iran long predates Trump—and it speaks to a dangerous naivety in German strategic thinking.

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(Wikipedia Commons)
The Putin-splainers
Germany’s Russia Lobby

From Nietzsche to Mann to Merkel, German culture has long had a soft spot for Russia.

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Film still via Wikimedia Commons
Silver Screen Reflections
The Magnificent Ambersons and the Age of Disruption

More than 75 years after its release, Orson Welles’s classic holds up as a visionary social prophecy.

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We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.