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Published on: July 21, 2015
Episode 76: Iranian Implications and a Civil War Reflection

Good afternoon, listeners! We have a great show for you this week as host Richard Aldous welcomes Paul Bracken to the show to discuss the strategic implications of the Iran deal, before speaking with Jim Remsen about the story of a former slave who fought for the Union in the Civil War.

First, Richard speaks with Paul Bracken, professor of management and political science at Yale University, about the recent Iran deal, who says this agreement will be looked back upon as the abandonment of the strategy of preventing a second nuclear age, and the adoption instead of a policy of management in a new nuclear epoch. He explains why he’s optimistic about the future of arms control despite his pessimism about Iran specifically, and addresses what these negotiations with Tehran will mean for nuclear proliferation in the Middle East. He explains how advances in cybersecurity technology are in many ways a destabilizing development because of the manner in which the technology can be used to combat nuclear deterrents.

Then, Richard welcomes retired Philadelphia Inquirer editor and author of the historical novel Visions of Teaoga Jim Remsen to the show to discuss his essay on a civil war veteran that survived his return to the South with the Union army after escaping north along the Underground Railroad. He explains how he came upon the story and how it relates to his hometown of Waverly, Pennsylvania, and tells the history of George Keys, one of the first fugitives to arrive in Waverly. He describes the magnitude of the decision for Keys and others like him to join the Union army and return to the South to fight in the civil war, and looks at why these former slaves made the decision to put themselves back in the fray.

Be sure to subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, and follow our host Richard Aldous @RJAldous and Jim Remsen @JimRemsen on Twitter.

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