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Published on: November 17, 2014
Episode 41: Iran’s Deadline and APEC’s Headlines

Relevant Reading:

Nuclear Know-How
Adam Garfinkle & Gary Samore

Obama’s Big China Win at APEC: Not What You Think
Elizabeth C. Economy

By All Means Necessary: How China’s Resource Quest is Changing the World
Elizabeth C. Economy and Michael Levi

Good evening, podcast listeners! You’re in for a stellar episode this week, as we take the time to look both ahead to next week’s deadline for Iranian nuclear negotiations, and back to the momentous agreements between the U.S. and China at last week’s APEC summit.

First, Gary Samore, President Obama’s White House Coordinator for Weapons of Mass Destruction Arms Control and Counterterrorism from 2009 to 2013 and executive director for research at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University, looks at the state of the negotiations to curb Iran’s nuclear program as they move to Vienna this week ahead of a November 24 deadline. He argues that it’s very unlikely a deal will be hashed out, as supreme leader Khamenei looks dead set against any proposed curtailment of his country’s nuclear program.

Samore discusses the likelihood that the two sides will agree to extend the deadline, noting that both the U.S. and Iran see the maintenance of the status quo as beneficial. He covers a large range of topics related to these negotiations, including the rise of ISIS, Russia’s interests, America’s new Republican-controlled congress, and President Obama’s recent letter to Khamenei.

Then, Elizabeth C. Economy, C.V. Starr Senior Fellow and Director for Asia Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, takes a look at what has changed in U.S.-China policy after last week’s APEC summit. She discusses the importance of the climate agreement, and looks at how cooperative a Republican Congress might be with regards to the President’s goals in Asia. She also speaks on what this means for the President’s popularity and his Administration’s legacy, and evaluates America’s pivot to Asia as a “work in progress,” but one that is working. In conclusion, she offers her assessment of how these agreements were received by America’s allies.

Be sure to subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, and follow our host Richard Aldous @RJAldous and Liz Economy @LizEconomy on Twitter.

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