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Conspiracy Thinking and Our Deteriorating Liberal Order
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  • rheddles

    The mainstream account of what America is and what its people believe has become increasingly divorced from reality—a sign of stunted imaginations and intellects.

    I’d agree with the first part, but stunted imaginations and intellects? I don’t think people have suddenly gotten dumber, and if anything, conspiratorial thinking involves overactive imaginations. No, I think the rise in broad acceptance of conspiratorial thinking is the result of a lack of confidence in leadership. Why there is this lack of confidence in the leadership (i. e. elites) would require me to expose the conspiracies which I believe, so I will remain silent to protect the innocent and my family.

  • Andrew Allison

    That the mainstream media’s account of what America is and what its people believe has become increasingly divorced from reality says nothing about the imaginations and intellects of the American people.

  • Anthony

    “Those of us who care about open society and democratic institutions should be very concerned.”

    Well if so, HZC, then we ought to read Carla Anne Robbins’ TAI Feature: What can we know and when can we know it as a primer.

  • leoj

    Krastev’s piece seems to be part of a drive to walk back the massive investment made by the Dems and the MSM (but I repeat myself) in this Trump-Putin collusion nonsense. Yesterday there was the piece by Greenwald, “Key Democratic Officials Now Warning Base Not to Expect Evidence of Trump/Russia Collusion”:
    But given the way these Russia conspiracies have drowned out other critical issues being virtually ignored under the Trump presidency, it’s vital that everything be done now to make clear what is based in evidence and what is based in partisan delusions. And most of what the Democratic base has been fed for the last six months by their unhinged stable of media, online, and party leaders has decisively fallen into the latter category, as even their own officials are now desperately trying to warn.
    https://theintercept.com/2017/03/16/key-democratic-officials-now-warning-base-not-to-expect-evidence-of-trumprussia-collusion/

    And earlier in the week the piece by Matt Taibbi, “Why the Russia Story Is a Minefield for Democrats and the Media”:
    But [the media] can’t do it with glibness and excitement, laughing along to SNL routines, before it knows for sure what it’s dealing with. Reporters should be scared to their marrow by this story. This is a high-wire act and it is a very long way down. We might want to leave the jokes and the nicknames be, until we get to the other side – wherever that is.
    http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/taibbi-russia-story-is-a-minefield-for-democrats-and-the-media-w471074

    So it’s ironic that Robbins piece is published in these pages today alongside this very sensible post by Cohen. Perhaps she didn’t get the memo from EchoChamber Central to ‘Ixnay on the onspiracykay’? Was it already written and just too dear to leave unpublished? These questions need answering!

    • Eurydice

      And yet, we have the Time.com piece by Donna Brazile that continues the Russia conspiracy story.

      • leoj

        That piece is as much about self-exculpation as it is a call for investigation. And this goes to the very impulse that brought the conspiracy into existence: not merely to delegitimize Trump, but also to divert attention away from what was revealed in the hacked emails. Once the conspiracy goes away, some in the party will want to return to the question of what unites the party and the relationship between its various wings.

        • Eurydice

          Oh, absolutely – she’s digging away like my cat in his litter box. And Time is right in there with her. She claims the intelligence community all agrees that Russia conspired to steal the election and Time provides helpful links, but the links just go to earlier stories with opinions and no evidence, then more links and no evidence, until we reach the original article which also has no evidence. The only real evidence that exists in her article is that she played some dirty tricks and was caught doing it.

          • D4x

            Can not stop laughing at your ‘cat digging away in his litter box’ metaphor. Too perfect! Except, who is going to scoop the poop and flush it away?, or change the litter box…

          • Andrew Allison

            I though that happened last November LOL

          • D4x

            Yes, but, the reference was to Brazile; I thought the litter box is the neoDem Party, in this metaphor.
            Probably not helping that I am up to 1974, in Follett Vol 3!

        • D4x

          Please advise if you think my new comment above should be deleted. I do not want anyone to be encouraged to read the sources cited. Am in shock they are so easily available today, without any disclaimer. Just wanted TAI to understand the rise in anti-Semitism in the past decade. TY.

          • leoj

            In general I’m of the opinion that sunlight is the best disinfectant.

          • D4x

            Better edit now. TY.

          • leoj

            You got this nut going after you for it. It seems you said something bad about Ron Paul’s followers so he wants to challenge you to a duel to restore his man’s honor. Meanwhile he’s down at the gutter of the thread polishing Herr Jungers epaulettes. Funny how just raising these issues gets these guys twisted.

          • D4x

            Reply-by-Edit is my current tactic, until I can see when they are flinging bait more to delegitimize than engage.
            Conflating disinfectant with ‘the gutter of the thread’ Too right! twice. (Australian usage)

        • D4x

          The Russia investigations are delegitimization by obstruction, with a big assist from the GOP. neoDems seem solely focused on delegitimizing POTUS Trump. When their Russohysteria fades, they will pivot to climate change, which appears to be what they believe will unite their Party.

          • leoj

            Don’t know if you read this piece but I found it interesting: Why It’s So Hard for Democrats to Pick Off Trump Supporters
            https://www.nationaljournal.com/s/649405?unlock=XDZICLLE1MJSYLP3

            No one ex­pressed much re­ceptiv­ity to sup­port­ing Demo­crats. The fo­cus group was com­mis­sioned by the Roosevelt In­sti­tute, a pro­gress­ive think tank, so it’s not sur­pris­ing that Green­berg’s pre­scrip­tion jibed with their policy pref­er­ences. But what was sur­pris­ing was how little any­one men­tioned sup­port for spe­cif­ic Demo­crats even though their pre­ferred eco­nom­ic policies aren’t all that dif­fer­ent from what lib­er­als gen­er­ally ad­voc­ate.

            It may just come down to some combination of an implosion of the Republican party (over any number of issues) and a waning of all of this insane progressive innervation. But, yeah, without progressive identity/grievance politics what do the dems have? If concern for the little man is no longer believable, then all you got is green relijun…

          • D4x

            TY, yes, been an interesting reading day. This insight by Kraushaar struck me as key “…Yes, Demo­crats could win a small slice of Trump voters by ad­opt­ing a more eco­nom­ic­ally pop­u­list mes­sage geared to­wards the Mid­west­ern states. But the cul­tur­al dis­con­nect between Trump’s voters and the op­pos­i­tion is so wide that it’s hard to see Demo­crats mak­ing com­prom­ises with this siz­able, dis­af­fected con­stitu­ency. …”

            Then I read this, mostly about Europe: “What If the ‘Populist Wave’ Is Just Political Fragmentation?
            An alternative theory of what’s shaping Western democracies”

            Uri Friedman | Mar 17, 2017
            https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2017/03/dutch-election-wilders-populism/519813/

            “…As Mark Leonard, the director of the European Council on Foreign Relations, has explained, “Parties of the left, which used to be anchored in the working class, in the trade union movement and factories, are now increasingly dominated by public-sector employees and creative industries like the media. Parties of the right, which used to stand for the aspirational classes, are now more elitist and metrosexual. The countryside is disgusted by the metrosexual cosmopolitanism of the conservatives, and the workers are disgusted by the new left.” …”

            It is more difficult for our duopoly to fragment and regroup, but they do, over time. 2016 is historic in that both are doing so during and after a presidential election. So 19th century! As for green relijun? It is an economic platform. Puzzling ‘they’ can not comprehend how unappealing it is.

            MY reading diverted to this, about the US and Russia, which, being from Canada, is refreshing in reporting what the Russohysteria conspiracy can not bear to acknowledge.

            “…The meetings demonstrated the Trump administration’s competence, and its predecessor’s incompetence. In October, during the Aleppo crisis in Syria, the U.S. and Russia had their first serious face-off since the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis, when Russia countered Obama’s decision to attack the Syrian army, saying it would shoot down any U.S. aircraft that threatened Russian personnel in Syria. Obama humiliatingly backed down then — he had failed to lay the groundwork for Russia-U.S. military co-operation to avoid accidental deaths, despite numerous pleas from an alarmed Dunford, who had sought permission to meet with the Russians to avoid high-stakes confrontations should the two countries find themselves functioning in the same war arena.

            Obama never did give that permission but the Trump administration swiftly did, leading to the co-operation that now exists between the two forces on the ground in Syria.

            The second military meeting, called to discuss how operations would unfold in Syria, was even more consequential, but this time because of who was and who wasn’t invited. The top brass from Turkey, a regional power, was present, as was the top military brass from the U.S. and Russia, the two global superpowers. Iran, an ally of Syria and, it thought, an ally of Russia’s, was not invited. The Trump administration in a matter of weeks had sidelined Iran, weakening, if not altogether breaking, the Russian-Iranian alliance.
            …”

            http://news.nationalpost.com/full-comment/lawrence-solomon-you-probably-didnt-notice-but-trump-and-putin-are-rebuilding-a-mighty-military-alliance

            At which point, I caught up on the Hezbollah-Iran-Syria-Golan-Lebanon imbroglio.
            It is Monday. good night!

      • Gary Hemminger

        In the old days folks like Brazile would be ousted from any decent organization. In todays world they are celebrated and given key posts in their respected political organizations. Anyone that doesn’t see Brazile as evil is really messed up. And that goes for all the Republicans that are messed up too. I can think of that idiot Cruz. How anyone could have voted for that guys is beyond me. As much as I hate Trunp, he is better than Cruz. That guys is evil.

    • Observe&Report

      Glenn Greenwald has been denouncing conspiracy theorising about Trump and Putin for a while now.

      • leoj

        Greenwald seems to be fairly sympathetic to Russia, and he never went along with all the crazy conspiracy-mongering. It’s the reporting about the ‘key democratic officials’ that’s new.

  • Unelected Leader

    It is certainly not a conspiracy that the NYT endorsed Clinton and is therefore a partisan political actor for the DNC.
    It is also not a conspiracy that Carlos Slim, the Mexican billionaire, is the single largest investor in the NYT.

  • Proverbs1618

    See, there is a problem of definitions here. I may say an obvious truth like “Media has an overwhelming leftwing bias” and be labeled as somebody who believes in conspiracy theories. Who gets to define what is truth and what isn’t?
    Honestly asking. I don’t know the answer. Wait…. I DO know the answer. The answer is to raise taxes above confiscatory levels above a certain random number determined by Comrade FriendlyGoat. That will define truth like a mother%@$%@.

  • Gary Hemminger

    Like our computers, we have become binary. There is no gray anymore. The other side is evil and must be stopped, regardless of the method to achieve it. Laws are only good if they apply to the other guys. Laws that you don’t like don’t have to be changed, they are simply ignored if you don’t like them. Think sanctuary cities for instance. I don’t much like Trumpism, but the law is the law. If you don’t like them, change them. Can you imagine if some Republican led cities or states become sanctuaries from environmental laws? Laws are not about meaningful rules, they are about how you stick it to the other guys.

    Now if you don’t have facts to smear the other guy, then you just create a conspiracy theory to show how they are evil. As mentioned in this article, this isn’t just a US phenomena, it is the whole western world embracing this hateful ideology. The progressive elite and the far right wacko conservatives are crazy. The folks with a little reason left better start marginalizing them both or we are in some deep trouble.

    • Eurydice

      What’s amusing to me is that conspiracy theories suppose a level of competence and secrecy which just isn’t possible when it comes to large groups of humans.

      • Angel Martin

        Especially government !

  • Joey Junger

    I don’t think there’s any kind of Jewish conspiracy afoot. A conspiracy is something that is done clandestinely. Jewish hubris has been so out of control for so long in the Occident that Jews don’t even bother to hide their inordinate influence; they brag about it (see, for instance, Joel Stein’s “How Jewish is Hollywood.”) Also, I don’t think arriving at such conclusions is the result of intellectual laziness. It’s the result of rigorous intellectual inquiry. Some of the most learned men (actually most of them) were antisemitic. Antisemitism is too persistent a historical phenomenon for it to be caused by anything besides the antagonistic behavior of Jews.

    On to the more general point of the article, the problem with accusing anyone (say Trump) of paranoia at this point is that the behavior of the deep state is so extreme (as revealed in the Vault 7 leaks) that reality outstrips even the wildest fantasies. We were in a post-truth, Orwellian nightmare well before the Golden Golem (as I think James Howard Kunstler calls Trump) stepped on the scene. Look at Obama, for God’s sake, a Nobel-peace prize laureate who bombed another Nobel-peace prize laureate (Doctors without Borders).

    • Jon Robbins

      Oh, is that what Kunstler calls Trump? Interesting.

    • Tom

      “Antisemitism is too persistent a historical phenomenon for it to be caused by anything besides the antagonistic behavior of Jews.”

      Hey, you know who else people constantly go after? Albinos. Man, those albinos–so antagonistic and obnoxious. With their creepy pale skin and all. And they won’t sit still and let us take their stuff.

      • Joey Junger

        Okay, I’ll name some of the malefactors in our catastrophic overseas wars brought to us by a coterie of Jewish neocons (from Feith to Kristol, to Boot, to Podhoretz, to Abrams) and then you can tell me some of the albinos involved. After that, I’ll mention some of the Jewish malefactors involved in some of the biggest financial crises in history (like Blankfein, Madoff, et. al), and you can name me some of the albinos involved.

        You ready to play?

        • leoj

          Right, those awful Joos: Bush, Cheney, and Rumsfeld… always warmongering.

          Besides, everyone knows that there is a whole book of the Talmud devoted to fighting really dumb overseas wars, and don’t even get me started on the infamous Rabbi Ponzi. I got all of this stuff not from the Joowish writers you mention (J. Stein and Kunstler–what kind of respectable antisemite only cites Joowish sources?!?!) but those really learned men like Hitler and Elijah Muhammad.

          • Joey Junger

            Do you really think this misspelling “Joos” is going to distract me from the fact than your analogy with albinos is ridiculous? It worked so well with Donald Drumpf, didn’t it? Tell me, have you read the “Culture of Critique” books?

          • Spencer

            Obviously he’s distracted you enough to cause you to mistake who made the analogy (Tom, not leoj). Apparently you’re easily distracted.

          • Tom

            He’s an anti-Semite. What did you expect?

          • Joey Junger

            You’re right. It is a pile-on of something like ten-to-one. Oy, vey it’s a disqus pogram! What a shoah!

          • leoj

            I double-checked. I spelled ‘Joos’ just like you did, so cut the pedantic nonsense. Let’s get to the important topics like Joowish albinos. If you thought Joos with melanin were bad, you should get to know some without.

          • Joey Junger

            I didn’t mean to offend, and I think it’s important that we be sensitive to the neuroses of the persecuted Jews, thirty billion of whom were exterminated in Hitler’s soap-making/lampshade factories (I think Elie Weisel may have been killed six or seven times).

          • leoj

            You couldn’t possibly offend me Joey. I pity you, in fact, since the Jews (not the fake Joos of your imagination) will only continue to increase and grow, beloved by all–even your seed, if you’ve managed to force yourself on some sorry creature during her rut. You lost and your best days are behind you. Peace, may you remain forsaken, forgotten, unloved.

          • Joey Junger

            The number of Jews has been rapidly dwindling for a long time now. Also, due to rabid ethnocentrism and a superiority complex (how arrogant can you be to call yourself “God’s Chosen People”) if my seed were to mate with a Jew, the offspring would cease to be Jewish (thereby annihilating another Jew; Israel even pays for ads to run in diaspora publications to ensure Jews don’t breed with non-Jews; that would be considered a eugenic supremacist move if anyone but Jews did it). Also, the number of Muslims worldwide is dwindling, and because Jews are delusional over the Ellis Island/Nation of Immigrants schmaltz, they’re working hard to bring more and more antisemitic Muslims into the West (sealing their fate). They were nearly annihilated by their enemies in the 20th century. It looks like they’ll have committed suicide through a mixture of folly and hubris by the end of the 21st century.

        • Tom

          Oh, that’s the game you want to play, then?
          Would now be a bad time to point out all the WASPS involved in setting up those events, like Cheney, Bush, Tenet, and Lobby in the case of Iraq, and Clinton, Dodd, Bush, and Gingrich in the case of the latter?
          Would now also be a bad time to inquire how an ordinary schmuck has anything to do with someone like Madoff or Dodd?

          • Joey Junger

            The problem with your counter-argument is that the Jewish intellectual who founded the movement of neoconservatism, Irving Kristol, is pretty honest about the roots and antecedents of neoconservatism. It may have non-Jewish adherents, but the only point the “Marx of the antisemites” (Kevin MacDonald) makes about Jews is that they are over-represented/ an essential component in these hostile intellectual movements. I can prove Jews are over-represented relative to their numbers of the population in this movement, and that they were the main intellectual impetus (see for instance Jacob Heilbrunn’s “They Knew they were right: the Rise of the Neocons”). Your job is much harder, and it looks like you’ve abdicated from it and settled for slinging a bit of mud and distractions. It’s too late, my friend. I’m sorry. The goyim know.

          • Tom

            As I am one of the goyim, you’re clueless. Also, Jews are over-represented in intellectual movements in general, so your point is moot.
            Get over yourself.

          • Joey Junger

            No, they’re not over-represented in every intellectual movement. They’re over-represented in left-wing political movements (see “Why are Jews Liberal” by Norman Podhoretz). Get over yourself.

          • Tom

            Your reading comprehension is poor. Also, I don’t classify your kind of thinking as an intellectual movement.
            It’s more of a gastronomic sort of thing.

          • Joey Junger

            No, considering I’ve at least cited books I’ve read, I’d say I’m the only one of us who’s demonstrated the ability to read something longer than a Disqus comment or an article.

          • Tom

            Nice try, but reality check, the books were lousy.

          • Joey Junger

            I assume you read them? Just kidding, I know you didn’t.

          • D4x

            Did you mean Scooter Libby, VP Cheney’s CoS when you wrote ‘Lobby’? If so, move Libby into the Jew column.

    • Proverbs1618

      Anti-Semitism AND rabid TDS together in one. I’M LISTENING!!! I sense the beginning of something that could be special. Have I found my Roger Waters to your David Gilmour?

      • Joey Junger

        Again, this technique of mockery to obfuscate has stopped working. It should have been obvious after Trump became president. Colbert’s efforts were for naught (as are yours).

        • Proverbs1618

          I’m not mocking you. I want to offer you a position of my pet anti-Semite. It has been vacant since my last pet anti-Semite went into hiding. But you seem to have a lot of what I’m looking for. That deadly serious thing you got going…. priceless!!!

          • Joey Junger

            Well, you’re free to call me whatever you want (anti-semite, racist, etc.). If I feel a need/void for you, I’m happy to be of service. I check Meade’s site about once a week, so hopefully I can continue to give your life meaning.

          • Proverbs1618

            Well, you have to work on your spelling first. If I “fill” not “feel”. My other pet anti-Semite also had problem with correct English grammar. Must be a trait or something.
            So what you got for me? A Khazar conspiracy? Jewish Lobby conspiracy? And did you notice the fact that Jews are running the Federal Reserve? Greenspan, Bernanke, Yellen. All Jews. I’m not saying we should be gassing anyone, I’m just asking the questions.
            Anyway, tell me what you got. But do be a dear and write in grammatically correct sentences. I know it’s hard but make an effort

  • FluffyFooFoo

    Many academics buttress these conspiracies. Shameful!

  • D4x

    If TAI is tracking anti-Semitism, you need to know the source, and pay attention to the recent revival editions of Henry Ford, Sr.’s, proven in several courts to be LIBEL (starting in the USA in 1927): 1920-1922 “The International Jew”. The boost ten years ago was from Ron Paul’s obsession with the Federal Reserve Bank. During the 2008 and 2012 primaries, Paul supporters were easily recognized when they said ‘the Federal Reserve is owned by foreign bankers’.

    My paper for a 2005 graduate course on “The History of Anti-Semitism” was on the precursor, the infamous 1903 Russian forgery:
    “The Protocols …”, which turned into a paper on Ford, Sr.’s far more ‘realistic’ version.

    In 2005, NO edition of Ford, Sr.’s book version was available for sale.

    “The Protocols…” WAS available in 2005 in a few English language editions, all with cautionary introductions that it was forgery based on a mid-19th century French satire, although other language editions were widely available, even in Japanese.

    To this day, I know someone is a former RonPaul supporter when they focus on the Fed.

    The far Left focus is on foreign policy, grounded in the 2007 Walt-Mearsheimer “Israel Lobby…”, and Carter’s 2006 “…Apartheid”

    Both extremes believe in the media control myth, because they usually believe Rupert Murdoch is a Jew.

    Whoever spun the tale in January, 2017 that had Trump lawyer Michael Cohen ‘meeting Kremlin officials in Prague’ was taking a page out of “The Protocols…”, where it was the Elders ‘secret meeting in a Prague cemetery’…

    Having read a few of the glowing comments on this ‘important historical, truthful work’ by Ford, Sr. at amazon.com.,
    now need to find my usual antidote: someone in Indonesia railing about the ethnic Chinese controlling everything.

    Not really sure about posting this comment, but taking comfort from knowing that every Pentium chip on earth was made in Israel.

    • Jon Robbins

      When did Ron Paul ever say that the Federal Reserve was owned by foreign bankers? Please provide the quotation–any quotation. LIbeling Ron Paul is not the right way to make whatever point it is you are trying to make.

      >”Whoever spun the tale in January, 2017 that had Trump lawyer Michael Cohen ‘meeting Kremlin officials in Prague’ was taking a page out of “The Protocols…”, where it was the Elders ‘secret meeting in a Prague cemetery’…”

      Try to get the paranoia under control. The assertion that Cohen had been in Prague, which Cohen convincingly denied, saying that he had never been in the city, was an attack on Trump and his alleged connections to the Russian government. It had nothing to do with Cohen per se. The claim that Cohen had been there to meet with Russian officials on behalf of Trump.

      Pull yourself together and stop thinking that an attack on Trump is somehow something out of the Protocols of Zion. You were right to wonder about posting your comment. Most of it is irrelevant to the subject, and some of it suggests a psychiatric issue on your part.

      • Tom

        “When did Ron Paul ever say that the Federal Reserve was owned by foreign bankers? Please provide the quotation–any quotation. Libeling Ron Paul is not the right way to make whatever point it is you are trying to make.”

        When did D4X ever say that Ron Paul said that the Fed was owned by foreign bankers? Please provide the quotation–any quotation.

        • Jon Robbins

          Yeah, I’m aware, he said “Ron Paul supporters.” Those were just weasel words to make an indirect attack on Ron Paul, one of the few honest men in this corrupt state. Interesting how threatened he is by Ron Paul’s demand for a Fed audit.

          But then, we can expect that sort of thing from someone who thinks that the attack on Trump via the claim that Michael Cohen was representing him in Prague has something to to do the the Protocols of Zion. Nutty!

          • Tom

            And I have no idea where you got the last sentence of your first paragraph.
            If you hear the dog whistle, you might want to think that it was meant for you.

          • Jon Robbins

            Not sure why you are so mystified. When Dx4 attacks “Ron Paul’s obsession with the Federal Reserve Bank,” what do you imagine he is referring to?

            Auditing the Fed was the centerpiece of RP’s monetary platform during his runs for president.

          • Tom

            Probably Paul’s view that the Fed is the architect of all our ills.

          • Jon Robbins

            You know that’s not true so why are you saying it? RP did NOT think the Fed was the source of all our ills. He had strong views on fiscal policy, foreign and defense policy as well. He wanted to minimize the reach of government–agree with that or not. His views on the Fed were a big part of his policy but hardly the only part.

            Interesting that you are so fixated on supporting D4X’s mindless attack on RP, while offering no opinion on his nutty and paranoid views about Michael Cohen and the “Prague Cemetery.” Should I take that as tacit support for his bizarre notion of the linkage between the Cohen-in-Prague episode and the Protocols?

    • Jon Robbins

      >”every Pentium chip on earth was made in Israel.”

      Where do you get that factoid?

      • D4x

        Sergey Mikhaylovich Brin

        • Jon Robbins

          Let’s see the quote.

  • Mark Hamilton

    “It was only a matter of time before the rise of anti-Semitism (on Left and Right, in Europe and the United States)”

    I don’t see much anti-Semitism on the American Right. Seems to me people are greatly exaggerating the numbers and influence of the “alt-Right” types. Where does one find actual Jew hatred in the GOP? The best most people can do is paint old paleo-cons like Pat Buchanan as anti-semites or slime Trump or Bannon or whoever despite all evidence to the contrary.

    Seems to me despite the fact that Jews continue to vote overwhelmingly for the Democrats, it’s on the Left that anti-semitism and certainly anti-Israeli sentiment has been growing in recent years, at least here in America.

    • Albert8184

      I see lots of anti-antisemitism on the Left. Unless I’m mistaken in linking anti-Zionism to antisemitism. But… I count Jews by their religious behavior… not by their parentage.

      • D4x

        AntiZionism IS the Left’s formal antiSemitism. It is how they justify BDS, and why they cling to the 2-state solution, while somehow denying they are anti-Semites.

        • Albert8184

          Indeed.

          • D4x

            Single best description I have read: “American liberal Jewish leaders fuel anti-Semitism” By Isi Liebler, March
            16, 2017 “We try to rationalize that the anti-Zionist behavior of individual Jews does not justify anti-Semitic bigotry.

            However, the crass political exploitation of their Jewish identity by American leaders of purportedly “nonpartisan” mainstream Jewish organizations is unprecedented. Today, in what must be described as
            self-destruction, a substantial number of irresponsible leaders of the most successful and powerful Jewish diaspora community seem to have gone berserk and are fueling anti-Semitism.

            Nobody suggests that Jews should not be entitled, like all American citizens, to engage in political activity of their choice. As individuals, they may support or bitterly criticize their newly elected president, but as leaders of mainstream religious and communal organizations, they are obliged, as in the past, to assiduously avoid being perceived as promoting partisan political positions.

            What has taken place in leading mainstream American Jewish organizations during and since the elections can only be described as a self-induced collective breakdown. What might have been regarded as a temporary
            aberration has in fact intensified in recent weeks. …”

            http://www.jpost.com/Opinion/Candidly-Speaking-American-liberal-Jewish-leaders-fuel-antisemitism-484291

        • Jon Robbins

          What does the two-state solution have to do with it?

  • Albert8184

    Conspiracy theories propagate when people attempt to explain things in the absence of real information or honest information. People try to create their own light to counter the darkness obscuring their world. It is quite natural to expect conspiracy theories to abound, for instance, when bewildered Westerners consider the suicidal policies of their leaders on “open borders” and unchecked immigration – and why they are called “fascists” and “haters” when they oppose what appears to be harmful.

    • Jon Robbins

      “Conspiracy theories propagate when people attempt to explain things in the absence of real information or honest information.”

      Well, ALL theories, whether they posit conspiracies or not, are simply proffered explanations for various phenomena, formulated in the absence of conclusive evidence, aren’t they?

      • Albert8184

        That’s right. So… this is no surprise.

  • ——————————

    Thinking that a group of people control large portions (especially relative to the size of their population in the world), of the media, Hollywood, finance, etc., does not make those thinkers conspiracy theorists, nor does it make them anti-Semites….

  • Jon Robbins

    Krastev’s argument makes no sense. If conspiracy theories really are growing in prevalence, than there must be some underlying social psychological cause or causes. Conspiracy theories themselves would be an effect of that cause, not the cause itself. Krastev is so obsessed with “conspiracy theories” that he can’t even understand the real cause-effect dynamic going on.

    In the NYT piece, he asserts,

    “Russian hacking of the servers of the Democratic National Committee was not a conspiracy theory but a fact.”
    How is that a “fact?” It has been plausible all along, but what concrete evidence do we have of that? None that I know of. There was a vague Intelligence Community report that provided no real evidence. The only hacking “fact” is that Guccifer hacked HRC’s “private” Secretary of State email server. We know that is a fact because he was tried and convicted and is now in a federal prison. We still lack any conclusive evidence of Russian hacking. And with the revelation in the Vault 7 leak that the CIA has technologies that can give a hack the appearance of being committed by a third party, it’s hard to know what is true and what is not.

    Krastev insists that we accept a conspiracy theory unsupported by conclusive evidence even as he complains about conspiracy theories in general.

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