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Brazil In Trouble
No Happy Ending for Brazil
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  • Andrew Allison

    Why should the world care about what happens in the most deeply corrupt country in Latin America? This post, incidentally, omits reference to what appears to be the real reason for the impeachment of Dilma, namely to protect an utterly corrupt legislature from prosecution (https://theintercept.com/2016/11/25/in-brazil-major-new-corruption-scandals-engulf-the-faction-that-impeached-dilma/)

    • Fat_Man

      “Why should the world care about what happens in the most deeply corrupt country in Latin America?”

      Geography. Brazil is not that far away, and it is the most important country in South America. If we want a peaceful, stable, prosperous Latin American that does not dump a tide of refugees and migrants on the US, we want a peaceful, stable, prosperous Brazil.

      Argentina is off in left field and should be left to its own devices, But Brazil is strategic and we should recognize it as such.

      • Andrew Allison

        Not going to happen. Brazil is a long, looong way away from the USA, not just because of the distance (which makes boats infeasible) but also because of language (which makes the land route infeasible).

        • Fat_Man

          I have known a number of emigrants from Brazil. Further, and more importantly there is such a thing as knock on effects. Venezuela is lapsing into chaos. If Brazil goes, it could destabilize other countries around it. It is not a good scenario for the US.

          • Andrew Allison

            You appear to be suffering from FG syndrome (when an argument is demolished, change the subject). There are “a number of” immigrants from just about any country under the sun. What’s not going to happen, for the reasons I stated, is a flood of them from Brazil. Furthermore, what happens in Brazil will have absolutely no effect on Venezuela’s downward trajectory. The other surrounding countries are relatively stable.

          • Fat_Man

            I did not say that there would be immigrants from Brazil. I said that there is a flood of refugees and and migrants from Latin America.

          • Andrew Allison

            You’ve got it bad [grin] There are, excluding Cuba, rather few refugees from Latin America, and equally few migrants from south of Mexico. What happens in Brazil will have little, if any, impact. Please tell me what, other than an imaginary flood of refugees and immigrants, why the world should care about what happens in the most deeply corrupt country in Latin America?

          • Fat_Man

            There are a great many migrants from Central America. Google MS13. What we need is peace, prosperity, and stability in the entire ring of countries around the Caribbean/Gulf of Mexico Basin.

          • Andrew Allison

            Wishful thinking (and WTF do economic migrants from Central America have to do with Brazil?).

    • Kev

      You can study Brazil to see what America will look like in a couple of generations.

      • CapitalHawk

        But, diversity is our strength!

      • JR

        I’ve thought if Hillary won, Brazil norte was our future.

        • Kev

          Nah, this election won’t make a difference in the bigger picture. Whites are already a minority among those aged 0-5.

  • Javyer Mendes

    Michel Fora Temer*

  • Pait

    The #fact is that Temer could still run a moderately successful administration. He’s been too willing to pick corrupt cronies of the old boy network for political positions, but his economic appointments have been quite good. There is a reasonable chance that Brazil will recover.

    Americans might want to pay attention to Brazil’s impeachment procedures of 2016 and 1992. The campaigns, promises, methods, and policies of both right wing and left wing impeached presidents have some uncomfortable similarities with those of you-know-who. So does the quality of the debate by their supporters. Wait and see.

  • Curious Mayhem

    “Better educated and more highly skilled than their parents and grandparents, [the young] today are unwilling to put up with the corrupt political structures inherited from the past.”

    Sounds like us.

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