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21st C Indenturement
Workers Laid Off By H-1B Immigrants Speak Out
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  • Jim__L

    What do you want to bet that Marco Peña is going to be a Trump voter?

    The idea that somehow selling out American workers — like the Establishment has been doing for a long, long time — appeals to people who’ve been here a while (even with names like Peña) would go a long way to explaining a Trump victory in the fall.

    • Angel Martin

      If he wasn’t before, he is now.

  • Ofer Imanuel

    As an H1B graduate (US citizen now), surrounded by a lot of H1B employees (tech, finance and pharmaceutical industries), and a hiring manager, I did not see this sort of behavior. So I think this is an abuse.
    A correction to the accuracy here:
    H1B visa is transferrable, and a transfer is much easier than initially getting them. I had a transfer (2001). 3 of the employees in my current team had a transfer – this year.
    If H1Bs (and the related, but different E1 and L1) are blocked, companies will outsource more.

    • Mark

      Well if H-1B’s are truly more qualified, then I have no problem with them being hired. The big “elephant in the room” at this point is that US citizens aren’t even being *considered* for the roles. Their applications are being thrown in the garbage (or the electronic equivalent) because firms are hooked on hiring H-1Bs instead of US citizens. As long as 2/3rds of our STEM workforce is unemployed, there is no justification whatsoever for H-1B. The O-1 visa can be used, in unlimited numbers, for those instances where truly top talent is needed, but unavailable in the domestic marketplace. Countries to which the USA has relatively balanced bilateral trade and economic relations, such as Canada, should receive employment preference in the United States if all US citizens are employed.
      Constraining the market for labour will improve productivity by forcing firms to use innovation, not brute force, to resolve their labour shortages. This should result in additional saleable/exportable technology.

  • Angel Martin

    I wish some H1B replacements would happen to our precious elite media and university professors.

    Suddenly it would become America’s existential crisis !

    • Jim__L

      Have you taken a significant number of University-level math courses in the last 20 years? You’ll see professors from all over the world there.

      Good luck understanding the lectures. =(

      • Angel Martin

        The tenured profs are all still there. They just don’t have to do lectures any more as they have these sessionals instead.

      • f1b0nacc1

        More like the last 35 years, but still, your point stands (grin)…

  • Matt B

    I have not been displaced by anyone on an H1B visa but I have witnessed rampant abuse of the system, including staffing entire teams under terms that are expressly forbidden under H1B. No attempt is made to hire citizens into these positions.

    A lot would change if there were just some enforcement of the existing law.

    • Matt B

      Correction, the case I referred to involved B-1 visas, which are supposed to be for short-term business visits, but were instead used for workers. These visas have something like a 6 month limit, but by rotating people regularly you can staff a team indefinitely. The B1 visas authorize meetings, product demonstrations and consulting, but forbid work that an employee would do.

      This company used that trick when they couldn’t get any more H1B’s.

      • Ofer Imanuel

        Strange. They would not need to, assuming they are a foreign company (or have a foreign subsidiary). They can get E1 or L1.

  • FriendlyGoat

    One more in a very long line of corporate-drafted junk pieces shoved across desks for individuals to sign. A non-disparagement clause of any kind in the employment setting should be patently unenforceable as a matter of public policy. But, alas, individuals do not know how to keep the incorporated-entity beasts THEY created by charter in appropriate confinement pens.

  • f1b0nacc1

    What is so amusing is to watch the various tech titans tell us how they want to support the American worker, then import boatloads of H-1Bs. Almost a perfect example of the limousine liberal…

  • Donald Campbell

    Don’t expect the chamberpot of commerce Republicans to do anything about this. Just banning the non-disparagement clauses would be a start. I believe it used to be called hush money.

  • Mark

    The H-1B is abused to such an extent, along with the OPT visa, that top US citizen grads from many of the nations finest schools can no longer obtain job interviews when they graduate with some of the latest/greatest skillsets in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Yes that’s right, US citizen engineers are “not wanted” by tech firms who are hooked on using H-1B labour. Since the 2000-2002 meltdown of the US tech sector and the firing of hundreds of thousands of US citizen workers, there has been very little hiring of US citizens. The H-1B statistics tell us that over 100% of the job growth in the sector since the meltdown went to foreign nationals on guest worker visas. This needs to stop. The O-1 visa is available to corporations to import truly top “best and brightest” talent (one of the qualifying conditions is a very high salary). The H-1B and OPT visas can be safely cancelled to give US citizens (and heaven forbid, Canadians, Western Europeans, and Japanese) preference over nationals of low-wage countries for employment in the United States.

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