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Why We Can't Have Nice Things
Why Are America’s Urban Mass Transit Systems in Crisis?
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  • Frank Natoli

    Blaming unions, however, isn’t a particularly productive strategy. For the most part, they’re advocating for their members’ interests like they’re supposed to be doing.
    Ah, so the criteria for union good or union bad is solely union doing good for union members?
    Anybody here remember the old IND and BMT trains, where the conductor had to stand between the two cars, hanging out beyond the cars, over the tracks, to open and close the doors?
    My father told me that there used to be a conductor between each and every car. Then they went on strike. They got their wage increases. And the owners [IRT and BMT were privately owned] had the trains rewired to need only one conductor per train.
    The City can’t do that today, because the City will not entertain the possibility of hiring replacement workers in the inevitable event of a strike.
    As long as the City operates as if organized labor has the final say, nothing will improve.

    • Andrew Allison

      You overlooked “Blaming unions, however, isn’t a particularly productive strategy. For the most part, they’re advocating for their members’ interests like they’re supposed to be doing. The problem is that there’s no pushback against them from politicians—or from the editorial pages of the New York Times.” It’s clear where the responsibility for the destructive overcompensation of public employees lies: with the voters who keep electing and reelecting the politicians who sell them down the river.

      • Frank Natoli

        Agreed. Just don’t like the suggestion that anybody doing “like they’re supposed to be doing” are blameless when what they’re doing is damaging to almost everyone in the City.

  • Josephbleau

    “I’ll worry about the kids when the kids join the union”, teachers union attorney.

  • FriendlyGoat

    Tax cuts have consequences. The AP reported today that the average price of an apartment in Manhattan is $2,000,000, that one in particular will soon be offered at $250,000,000——-AND—-alas, no one knows how to maintain the subway.

    • seattleoutcast

      Again, you miss the point and shove your own agenda into the comments.

      • FriendlyGoat

        Well, perhaps you have some explanation why extreme wealth is sloshing all over Manhattan in New York City—–as evidenced by the prices being paid to live there——and the subway is headed into disrepair.

        • phwest

          Because the wealthy don’t ride the subway?

          • FriendlyGoat

            Yes. Very astute. It’s my understanding that some of them, perhaps even one of our presidential candidates, prefer helicopters off the tops of buildings.

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