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Reformer vs. Religious Authoritarian
For Modi, a Return to the Bad Old Days?
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  • George Von Herman

    I don’t feel bad for NGO’s – they act many times as 5th columns – but let’s say they are angels – why did the charities not say where they got their funding? This was a prior law that they didn’t keep, so Modi is illiberal for keeping his countries laws?

  • Andrew Allison

    Let me see if I’ve got this right: Modi’s two major policy thrusts have the approval of a majority of Indians, but they’re bad, bad, bad? Haven’t the past couple of decades demonstrated rather conclusively that telling other nations what’s good for them does more harm than good?

    • Tom

      You don’t quite have it. Modi’s economic reforms are good, while his emphasis on nationalism is bad. This is fairly consistent with VM’s general bent.

      • Andrew Allison

        My point was that, in the absence of a direct threat to US national interests, it’s up to the Indians to decide whether Modi’s nationalism is good or bad. The US conceit that we know what’s good for other countries has got us into a whole lot of trouble.

        • Tom

          Fair enough. However, I’d contend that it does bear watching, not so?

          • Andrew Allison

            Agreed, but watching for a threat to US interests rather than to those of Indians (or Afghans, or Iraqis., etc.). Even if it were proper for the US to impose its view of “democracy” on the rest of the world, we lack the means to do so, or even to clean up the messes we create by trying.

          • JR

            Not to mention, that the very idea of Barack Obama telling somebody that they shouldn’t play the race card is laughable at best.

          • Andrew Allison

            Well yes, Obama and Holder have set back race relations in this country by a generation or more. Would anybody seriously suggest that they are they are not worse today than they’ve been since the 70s? History will not be kind to the Great Divider.

  • Kevin

    NGOs insisting they be allowed to give money to promote opposition to various regimes is a tough pill to swallow. The U.S. has vaguely similar laws prohibiting foreign funding of political campaigns. Any political system is going to find foreign funding of opposition difficult to allow. NGOs are in a tough spot because many of them are trying to subvert the local government.

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