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The Boston Manhunt and the MSM’s Gun Control Blind Spot


We wrote about the MSM’s inability to grasp the politics that caused the gun control bill to fail in the Senate this week. The aftermath of the Boston Marathon bombing illustrates the divide.

Millions of Americans listening to the bulletins on the developing manhunt were either glad they had guns in their homes or thought seriously about getting them. Yet for many professional journalists, and maybe especially those in the Acela corridor in the Northeast, this reaction is incomprehensible.

Put simply, millions of Americans don’t want to depend only on the police for protection. They think about the inevitable interval between calling 911 and the arrival of the cops, and they don’t want to wait helplessly for the good guys to arrive. Events like this one reinforce deeply held public beliefs about the dangerous world we live in and the limits of the state’s ability to protect the people from the bad guys.

This may not strike enlightened and well credentialed Acela liberals as sensible or rational, but that’s not the point. Without understanding the visceral belief that many Americans have, that their “right to bear arms” is about self defense and the right to take care of your own when the State fails you, it’s impossible to understand the politics of gun control in the United States.

The chances of getting 60 votes in the Senate for serious gun control remain slim to none.

[Gun image courtesy of HelgaLin /]

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  • cubanbob

    The chances of the House passing it are none at all. This bill was a stunt, a campaign prop for the 2014 congressional elections. The show bombed ( pardon the pun) and now the democrats are acting like whinny little children. The immigration bill will also get nowhere in the house and may not even get passed in the senate.

  • Andrew Allison

    The chances of getting 50 votes in the Senate for serious gun control remain slim to none!

  • Lorenz Gude

    What is obvious to me about 9/11 and the Boston Marathon bombings is that the Militia played an important role in both. Todd ‘let’s roll’ Beamer and the passengers of flight 93 were the militia on 9/11. And yesterday it was the militia that found the second bomber in their back yard. All the Kings horses and all the King’s armored vehicles couldn’t find Humpty, but soon after the Militia were told they could go outside, an ordinary citizen found the fugitive. A broader word for militia is ‘social capital’ and we routinely undervalue it. All the ordinary citizens who took pictures proved to be an entirely new digital form of the Militia too. And, to be fair, surveillance cameras – government owned and private have been shown to be useful too. I think it was also the Militia that pushed the investigation forward with their unauthorized online search for the culprits and that may have forced the pace of the investigation.

    • Tom22ndState

      Grand Slam, outta the park.

  • Stephen

    “Events like this one reinforce deeply held public beliefs about the dangerous world we live in and the limits of the state’s ability to protect the people from the bad guys.”

    There is much to be chewed over in this statement alone. It is a point easily dismissed or overlooked by those in society who live their lives apart from the greater mass of the public. It has long been so along the eastern corridor now aptly referenced by the Acela line. People can live among great masses and not be part of that mass.

    It is cliche to make note of the violent nature of American society relative to European counterparts, though this is less in evidence now than some would assert. If there is any surprise to be had in this, it is that it is not more violent.

    For the better part of its history, the US has been a very open society, priding itself on being a nation of immigrants, and so it should. However, by being this open a price is to be paid by accepting a perpetual underclass that is an ever-changing mix of the world’s cultures and societies…and their pathologies. There is no avoiding it, and it’s to the nation’s credit that it has generally accepted the challenge this poses. Those who live within the stew have a visceral understanding of this not shared by those who can and choose to live their lives sheltered from it. The wariness noted in the sentence quoted above goes deeper than any single incident, and should be no surprise to anyone who considers the arc of the nation’s history.

  • Larry Sprague

    I think that the broader issue is that most Americans believe not only
    do they have a right to self defense, but also a duty to provide self
    defense. I analogize it to the right to vote. One has a right to vote;
    one has a duty to vote; but one does not have to vote.

  • foobarista

    Contrary to TV portrayals, the police aren’t an on-call personal security force, but actual “law enforcement”. In other words, in the vast majority of cases, they catch lawbreakers after the fact. While the lawbreaking is in progress, your only reliable defense is what you happen to have around you when the bad guy is about. In this situation, a big dog and a gun are far more valuable than a cop who may be many miles away.

    The irony is not only does the top levels of the media and political class have their own personal security details so they don’t have to wait for the police to deal with any bad guys.

  • golfhacker

    Sales of guns in Boston should be booming the next few months. Cowering in fear, hoping the government will be there to protect you is no way to live your life. When seconds count, the police are minutes away. It took the police over 20 minutes to get to the Newtown shooting. How did that turn out???

    The cops fired hundreds of bullets at the Boston bombers. They killed one, but the other guy got away. It just goes to show you that citizens really
    need guns with high capacity ammo clips to protect themselves when the SHTF.

    Gun control is all about controlling the people.

  • Michael Kelley

    The residents of Boston seemed kind of helpless in all this, hiding in their homes and waiting for the cops to shoot these two whiners. I guess that’s what you get when you disarm the public.

  • Southwestern SongDog

    Gun ownership = self-reliance= not a good communitarian citizen.

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