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EU on Hezbollah: What, Me Worry?

AFP reports that the European Union declines to consider Hezbollah as a terrorist organization:

The European Union turned down a request on Tuesday by Israeli Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman to blacklist Hezbollah as a terror group after last week’s deadly bombing in Bulgaria.

“There is no consensus for putting Hezbollah on the list of terrorist organisations,” said Cypriot Foreign Minister Erato Kozakou-Marcoullis, whose country currently holds the rotating EU presidency.

[ . . . ] Kozakou-Marcoullis said Hezbollah was an organisation comprising a party as well as an armed wing and was “active in Lebanese politics”.

The rationale is elaborated upon by Kozakou-Marcoullis in the Jerusalem Post:

“The Lebanese Hezbollah is an organization that comprises a political party, social services network as well as an armed wing,” she said. “Hezbollah is active in Lebanese politics, including the parliament and the government, and plays a specific role with regard to the status quo in Lebanon.”

Thankfully, she left the door open for a change in policy if anybody could find some “tangible evidence” that this well-meaning group of social workers had actually done anything wrong.

Apparently word has not reached the European Union about some of Hezbollah’s past activities. Perhaps officials might like to look into some of the following:

Before making a final determination, the terrorism sleuths at the EU might want check and see if any friendly intelligence organizations have files on Hezbollah that could help. The United States, United Kingdom and Canada have all listed Hezbollah as a terrorist group. Perhaps there are reasons. Worth following up with a phone call, anyway.

But the EU has at least provided a new answer to an old question.

Q: What do you call something if it looks like a duck, walks like a duck and quacks like a duck?

A: A political wing.

Reports suggest that France, with its historically close ties to Lebanon, where Hezbollah is a member of the ruling coalition and has good relations with pro-French Christian groups (this week, anyway), is the country preventing the EU from placing the organization on the terror list. Whatever the reason, the EU should fix this and fast; it is follies like this that discredit international institutions and make it look as though crude politics trumps common moral sense within them.

And we all know that’s just not true.

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  • Corlyss

    “it is follies like this that discredit international institutions and make it look as though crude politics trumps common moral sense within them.”

    Um . . . I don’t know how to break this to you, Prof. . . .

  • Jacksonian Libertarian

    Why is it always the stinking French? It’s like the French are the enemies of civilization, they certainly always seem to be working against the western culture’s best interests. The French are like the people that try to advance themselves by tearing other people down, instead of through good works and achievements, they are justifiably despised as those “Cheese eating surrender monkeys”.

  • http://Thepencilofnature.net Lorenz Gude

    But a duck has two wings?! I’m going crazy here!

  • Kris

    “The Lebanese Hezbollah is an organization that comprises a political party, social services network as well as an armed wing”

    See that website? I built that website by myself, manually coding the HTML, filling it with original material, and updating it daily, but do they call me Kris the content provider? Nooo! …

  • http://facingzionwards.blogspot.com/ Luke Lea

    Isn’t this an argument for scrapping the UN?

    If it doesn’t stand for anything, what does it stand for? I’d rather see a league of liberal democracies.

  • http://facingzionwards.blogspot.com/ Luke Lea

    Sorry, got the EU mixed up with the UN. What’s wrong with the EU?

  • http://facingzionwards.blogspot.com/ Luke Lea

    Oh, wait, I know what’s wrong with the EU. They refuse to accept responsibility for starting the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

  • Kris

    Luke@5, I assume you read the post too rapidly; this was an EU decision. While I don’t disagree with your proposal, this is actually a good example of why I don’t think such a league would be particularly effective.

  • Kris

    Luke@7: Nice save. :-)

  • Snorri Godhi

    OK, Jacksonian puts it too strongly (and conveniently forgets the contributions of long-dead Frenchmen such as Pasteur, Pascal, Laplace, Montesquieu, Tocqueville, Bastiat, etc) but I do think that most if not all of the EU’s problems would be solved by expelling France. Once that is done, I don’t even think there would be any more need to get Greece out of the eurozone.

  • http://ziontruth.blogspot.com Eliyahu

    Walter, it may be ironic that on the same day in 1983 that the Hizb [then usually called the Party of God in the press] bombed the US Marine barracks in Beirut, they also bombed the French troop barracks there, killing about 60 French troops. So why don’t the wise Europeans, who can’t solve their own economic crisis, understand that the Hizb is a threat to them too?

  • http://web-logos.blogspot.com/?m=1 JCP Brown

    Given that there’s a war going on Syria, and that France often advances its foreign policy under the radar, so to speak (ie, intelligence, special ops, counter-intel, etc…), I wouldn’t be surprized if this was on purpose. Give it time, and don’t be too beholden to the the first pangs of moral indignation that might blind one from the elements of a longer game being put into place.

  • Corlyss

    @Eliyahu

    “So why don’t the wise Europeans, who can’t solve their own economic crisis, understand that the Hizb is a threat to them too?”

    You don’t understand, Eliyahu. Hizb is a threat to America because America is mean, loud, rude, overbearing, bossy, and culturally [loose].

    Hizb is not a threat to the French because they are wise, measured, polite, elegant, refined, superior in every way, friend of the down-trodden (esp. America’s enemies), and Leaders of the Free World because their laungage, literature, wines, pastries, and haute couturie eclipse all others. Hizb will eventually recognize their natural affinity for the French, their true allies. It’s just a matter of time.

  • Corlyss

    @ Luke
    “I’d rather see a league of liberal democracies.”

    France thinks its the natural born leader of everything it belongs to. They would have to be included in such an organization, and I just don’t see that as solving the French problem.

    Earlier in the 21st Century, esp. around the time de Villepin suckered Colin Powell into taking Iraq to the UN Security Council where the latter was quite rightly completely embarrassed and discredited (by which I mean only a fool would have taken Iraq to that body for a favorable decision), it was common to hear foreign policy gurus with real heft lament the waywardness of European defense policy once Germany decided to partner with France and let them lead a more or less common foreign policy for the EU. France likes to think of itself as a counterweight to US influence. They believe they are the natural leaders of the multipolar post Cold War world. Whatever we’re for, they’re agin reflexively. De Gaule wasn’t just De Gaule; he was an expression of deeply held self-aggrandizing national delusions about France’s role in the world.

  • Kris

    JCP@12: Could be, but the issue isn’t so much that the EU is not currently designating Hezbollah a terrorist organization but rather that it has never done so.

  • steve mann

    There are now so many Islamic organisations within the E.U.
    The politicians are now Excrement scared of proscribing any of them-
    Even Hizb u-Tariah is still operating in UK universities.

    http://www.cbn.com/media/player/index.aspx?s=/mp4/DHU227v2_WS

    Thats just in Belgium- There are these groups all over Europe-

  • Empress Trudy

    It’s not that the EU doesn’t think Hezbollah isn’t a terrorist organization, it’s that they think terrorism itself is entirely noble, legitimate and just, as long as Jews die.

  • swer

    Ask Bank of Beirut

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