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'Weirdo' Wu Goes as Wayward Woo Woes Grow

Another one bites the dust.  Sexual missteps and worse are among Washington’s most common career killers; the elite educational system in this country has essentially abandoned the task of providing moral and religious guidance to help bright, ambitious young people steer clear of these traps.

Sad — from every point of view.

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  • Kenny

    I’d be remiss if we did not examine this Sanders fellow, too, John F. Kerry’s voice.

  • DANEgerus

    I just saw Wu a couple of weeks ago in Sherwood’s parade, walking just behind the Jr. High’s dance team. Just behind.

  • Mrs. Davis

    Great header. Post is looking for a replacement

  • Charles R. Williams

    There are now and have always been a small but significant percentage of men who are unable or are unwilling to conform to the requirements of sexual morality. For some men this is a temporary issue and for others this is a lifelong issue. What is new is the magnitude of the scandal that now results when these guys are caught. When you list the scandals, you have a long list but actually the percentage of men in high places involved is very small. I would love to blame this on the failure of educators but it’s hard to make the charge stick.

  • Tavener

    Perhaps it’s not the percentage of men in high places involved in this kind of misconduct that’s small, but rather the percentage who get caught. It could be that “our” elite educational system is as good at tutoring its students in duplicity as it is bad at tutoring them in morality.

  • oliver

    Perhaps what congress needs is a Jesuit education.

  • CatoRenasci

    But this is what the institutions and the children wanted.

    The elite universities spent 100 years from the 1870s to the 1970s transforming themselves from (often religiously-oriented) colleges into German-style research universities.

    And, the children have been trying to slough off the administration’s regulation of their behavior in loco parentis at least since the 1920s, but truly in earnest since the 1960s, when the sophisticated administrations gave up on it.

    Any sort of moral guidance or instruction, or restrictions on the kiddies behavior (other than the increasing enforcement of political correctness) was given up by the early 1970s – Brown’s clothing optional dorm, with men and women sharing bathrooms and often rooms being only the most obvious reductio ad absurdum of administration underwriting of student license.

    Morality divorced from religion may not be impossible, as some believe, but it’s certainly far, far more intellecually and emotionally demanding, and requires a much more firmly developed character, with deeply felt senses of humility, duty, and (dare I say it) honor.

    Nietzsche recognized the fact that being able to act morally and avoid nihilism in the absence of religion was perhaps the most difficult of things, in his writings on the death of god.

    Of course, our modern elite universities and colleges don’t much read Nietzsche deeply, and seem to have given up on their core commitment to the values of the West.

    As much as I value the time I spent 40 years ago in a great research university, I value far more my undergraduate education at the unabashedly unfashionably character-building Virgina Military Institute.

  • ChurchSox

    “…the requirements of sexual morality.”

    Are there any requirements of sexual morality anymore?

  • dennymack

    I think the most illuminating statement on this situation comes from Rep. Mitch Greenlick, D Portland:
    “I guess it was inevitable. He was really thrown to the wolves by the Democratic caucus.” (Oregonian, 7/27)
    Wu is obviously cratering, with allegations of serious sexual misconduct stacked on top of behavior that would get most of us fired, and what is his colleague’s criticism? They did not protect him from the consequences of his actions thoroughly enough.
    I guess we should be grateful that the man in the tiger suit is staying long enough to vote on how we will borrow and spend my great grand children’s trillion dollars.

    I wonder if there will be any consequence for those who hid what they knew about his implosion long enough to get through the 2010 election? I suspect that the “consequence” for them is that they will be considered admirably discrete staffers, and will be much sought after.

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